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  1.  62
    Aristotle's Rhetoric: An Art of Character.Eugene Garver - 1994 - University of Chicago Press.
    In this major contribution to philosophy and rhetoric, Eugene Garver shows how Aristotle integrates logic and virtue in his great treatise, the _Rhetoric._ He raises and answers a central question: can there be a civic art of rhetoric, an art that forms the character of citizens? By demonstrating the importance of the _Rhetoric_ for understanding current philosophical problems of practical reason, virtue, and character, Garver has written the first work to treat the _Rhetoric_ as philosophy and to connect its themes (...)
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  2. Aristotle's Rhetoric: an Art of Character.Eugene Garver - 1997 - Philosophical Quarterly 47 (189):540-542.
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  3. Aristotle's "Rhetoric": An Art of Character.Eugene Garver - 1996 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 29 (4):436-440.
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  4.  23
    The Politics of Nonviolent Action.Eugene Garver - 1974 - Political Theory 2 (4):465-467.
  5.  23
    For the Sake of Argument: Practical Reasoning, Character, and the Ethics of Belief.Eugene Garver - 2004 - University of Chicago Press.
    What role should it play? And are claims to rationality liberating or oppressive? For the Sake of Argument addresses questions such as these to consider the relationship between thought and character.
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  6.  85
    Confronting Aristotle's Ethics: ancient and modern morality.Eugene Garver - 2006 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    What is the good life? Posing this question today would likely elicit very different answers. Some might say that the good life means doing good—improving one’s community and the lives of others. Others might respond that it means doing well—cultivating one’s own abilities in a meaningful way. But for Aristotle these two distinct ideas—doing good and doing well—were one and the same and could be realized in a single life. In Confronting Aristotle’s Ethics, Eugene Garver examines how we can draw (...)
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  7.  38
    Aristotle's Politics: Living Well and Living Together.Eugene Garver - 2011 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    “Man is a political animal,” Aristotle asserts near the beginning of the _Politics_. In this novel reading of one of the foundational texts of political philosophy, Eugene Garver traces the surprising implications of Aristotle’s claim and explores the treatise’s relevance to ongoing political concerns. Often dismissed as overly grounded in Aristotle’s specific moment in time, in fact the _Politics_ challenges contemporary understandings of human action and allows us to better see ourselves today. Close examination of Aristotle’s treatise, Garver finds, reveals (...)
  8.  9
    Machiavelli and the history of prudence.Eugene Garver - 1987 - Madison, Wis.: University of Wisconsin Press.
  9.  45
    Comments on `Rhetorical Analysis Within a Pragma-Dialectical Framework.Eugene Garver - 2000 - Argumentation 14 (3):307-314.
  10. Machiavelli and the History of Prudence.Eugene Garver - 1991 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 24 (1):73-76.
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  11.  13
    Plato’s Crito On the Nature of Persuasion and Obedience.Eugene Garver - 2012 - Polis 29 (1):1-20.
    The Crito dramatizes the impossibility, and the indispensability, of persuasion sby locating it between two extremes, Socrates and the Laws, the truths of philosophy and the force of politics. The question is whether those two limits are themselves inside or outside rhetoric. Can philosophy persuade, ormust it always be an alternative sto persuasion? Socrates insists on ignoring the opinion, and the power, of the many, and so the Laws have to show themselves as different from the opinion of the many (...)
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  12.  18
    Plato’s Crito On the Nature of Persuasion and Obedience.Eugene Garver - 2012 - Polis 29 (1):1-20.
    The Crito dramatizes the impossibility, and the indispensability, of persuasion sby locating it between two extremes, Socrates and the Laws, the truths of philosophy and the force of politics. The question is whether those two limits are themselves inside or outside rhetoric. Can philosophy persuade, ormust it always be an alternative sto persuasion? Socrates insists on ignoring the opinion, and the power, of the many, and so the Laws have to show themselves as different from the opinion of the many (...)
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  13.  29
    Deliberative Rhetoric and Ethical Deliberation.Eugene Garver - 2013 - Polis 30 (2):189-209.
    Central to Aristotle’s Ethics is the virtue of phronēsis, a good condition of the rational part of the soul that determines the means to ends set by the ethical virtues. Central to the Rhetoric is the art of presenting persuasive deliberative arguments about how to secure the ends set by the audience and its constitution. What is the relation between the art and the virtue of deliberation? Rhetorical facility can be a deceptive facsimile of virtuous reasoning, but there can be (...)
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  14.  46
    Aristotle's Natural Slaves: Incomplete Praxeis and Incomplete Human Beings.Eugene Garver - 1994 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (2):173-195.
  15. From Puzzles to Principles?: Essays on Aristotle's Dialectic.Allan Bäck, Robert Bolton, J. D. G. Evans, Michael Ferejohn, Eugene Garver, Lenn E. Goodman, Edward Halper, Martha Husain, Gareth Matthews & Robin Smith - 1999 - Lexington Books.
    Scholars of classical philosophy have long disputed whether Aristotle was a dialectical thinker. Most agree that Aristotle contrasts dialectical reasoning with demonstrative reasoning, where the former reasons from generally accepted opinions and the latter reasons from the true and primary. Starting with a grasp on truth, demonstration never relinquishes it. Starting with opinion, how could dialectical reasoning ever reach truth, much less the truth about first principles? Is dialectic then an exercise that reiterates the prejudices of one's times and at (...)
     
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  16.  37
    Aristotle's natural slaves: Incomplete.Eugene Garver - 1994 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (2):173-195.
  17.  63
    Why Can’t We All Just Get Along: The Reasonable vs. the Rational According to Spinoza.Eugene Garver - 2010 - Political Theory 38 (6):838-858.
    Spinoza presents a picture of the good human life in which being rational and being reasonable or sociable are mutually supporting: the philosopher makes the best citizen, and citizenship is the best route to philosophy and adequate ideas. Crucial to this mutual implication are the roles of religion and politics in promoting obedience. It is through obedience that people can become "of one mind and one body" in the absence of adequate ideas, through the presence of shared empowering imaginations and (...)
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  18.  7
    Factions and the Paradox of Aristotelian Practical Science.Eugene Garver - 2005 - Polis 22 (2):181-205.
    Politics V presents preserving and destroying the constitution as exhaustive alternatives, leaving no apparent room for improving the constitution. Aristotle claims that 'if we know the causes by which constitutions are destroyed we also know the causes by which they are preserved; for opposites create opposites, and destruction is the opposite of security' . The first seven chapters present the causes by which constitutions are destroyed, and then chapters 8 and 9 show the causes by which they are preserved. Yet (...)
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  19.  51
    Aristotle's metaphysics of morals.Eugene Garver - 1989 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (1):7-28.
    The distinction from the "metaphysics" between rational and irrational potencies is inadequate to explicate the idea of moral virtue as a "hexis prohairetike", A habit concerned with choice. Aristotle's definition of virtue articulates a connection between potency and act more complex than either possible or necessary in the theoretical sciences. In ethics, The actuality to be explained is not this good action but this action "qua" the action of a good man. Analysis of that relation allows us to see more (...)
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  20. After Virtu: rhetoric, prudence and moral pluralism in Machiavelli.Eugene Garver - 1996 - History of Political Thought 17 (2):195-223.
  21.  41
    Can virtue be bought?Eugene Garver - 2004 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 37 (4):353-382.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Can Virtue Be Bought?Eugene Garver1. The problem: Epistemic elitism or cognitive dominanceDemocracy and rationality can be enemies. Superior intelligence and information can silence people, and the voices of reason can be drowned out by anti-intellectual populism. Given the dearth of both democracy and rationality in contemporary American politics, I hope that each can be fortified by association with the other, but I don't think that mutual reinforcement is easy. (...)
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  22.  60
    Essentially Contested Concepts: The Ethics and Tactics of Argument.Eugene Garver - 1990 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 23 (4):251 - 270.
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  23.  21
    Euthyphro Prosecutes a Human Rights Violation.Eugene Garver - 2014 - Philosophy and Literature 38 (2):510-527.
    Socrates encounters Euthyphro as both are on their way to court, Socrates as a defendant against charges of blasphemy and Euthyphro as a prosecutor of his father for negligently causing the death of a slave—a human rights violation. While I argue that piety and pollution supply a productive way of thinking about human rights crime and punishment, Euthyphro is a very troubling model for the human rights prosecutor, since he is an almost paradigmatically unattractive character. Reading the Euthyphro leads to (...)
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  24.  37
    Prolegomenon to a history of prudence: A critical synthesis.Eugene Garver - 1987 - Social Epistemology 1 (1):61 – 82.
  25.  10
    The Ethical Criticism of Reasoning.Eugene Garver - 1998 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 31 (2):107 - 130.
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  26.  3
    Truth in Politics- Ethical Argument, Ethical Knowledge, and Ethical Truth.Eugene Garver - 2002 - Quest - and African Journal of Philosophy 16 (1-2):220-237.
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  27.  10
    Point of view, bias, and insight.Eugene Garver - 1993 - Metaphilosophy 24 (1-2):47-60.
  28.  37
    Aristotle and the Will to Power.Eugene Garver - 2006 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (2):74-83.
    Once we get past moral outrage, Aristotle’s notorious discussion of slavery has several ever more disquieting challenges to modern thinking. Not only are slaves in a certain sense “natural,” but so is the master/slave relationship and so is mastery. While he thinks that living the right kind of state and having the right kind of character is a permanent solution to problems of slavishness, problems of mastery, of the despotic cast of mind, are permanent political problems, since the desire to (...)
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  29.  58
    Aristotle's "De Interpretatione": Contradiction and Dialectic (review).Eugene Garver - 1998 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (3):459-460.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Aristotle’s “De Interpretatione”: Contradiction and Dialectic by C. W. A. WhitakerEugene GarverC. W. A. Whitaker, Aristotle’s “De Interpretatione”: Contradiction and Dialectic. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996. Pp. x + 235. Cloth, $60.00.Traditionally, the De Interpretatione is placed in the Organon between the Categories and the Prior Analytics. Where the Categories is about single terms and the Analytics about inferences, the De Interpretatione is about propositions. That traditional view is (...)
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  30.  50
    Aristotle's genealogy of morals.Eugene Garver - 1984 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 44 (4):471-492.
  31.  38
    Aristotle's "Rhetoric" as a Work of Philosophy.Eugene Garver - 1986 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 19 (1):1 - 22.
  32.  31
    Book ReviewsAlice Crary,. Beyond Moral Judgment.Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2007. Pp. 256. $39.95.Eugene Garver - 2008 - Ethics 118 (2):338-340.
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  33.  9
    Colloquium 3.Eugene Garver - 1989 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 5 (1):73-96.
  34.  9
    Colloquium 5.Eugene Garver - 1994 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 10 (1):171-200.
  35.  17
    Charmides and the Virtue of Opacity: An Early Chapter in the Hitory of the Individual.Eugene Garver - 2017 - Review of Metaphysics 71 (3).
    The Charmides, searching for a definition of temperance, constantly confronts problems of reflexivity, transparency and opacity. Transparency and opacity structures the Charmides, from the dramatic beginning of Socrates peeking inside Charmides’ cloak, to Charmides’ initial depiction of sôphrosynê as concealing what one can do. The final two proposed definitions of temperance in the Charmides, self-knowledge and the knowledge of knowledge, are explicitly reflexive. That reflexivity is best understood by juxtaposing it to transparency and opacity, in the issue of whether someone (...)
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  36.  16
    Colloquium 2: Living Well and Living Together: Politics VII 1-3 and the Discovery of the Common Life.Eugene Garver - 2010 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 25 (1):43-67.
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  37.  49
    Democracy and Disobedience. Peter Singer.Eugene Garver - 1976 - Ethics 86 (2):175-179.
  38.  24
    Gaskins`sBurdens of Proof in Modern Discourse.Eugene Garver - 1994 - Informal Logic 16 (3).
  39.  51
    How to Develop Ideas.Eugene Garver - 1983 - Teaching Philosophy 6 (2):97-102.
  40.  13
    How to Develop Ideas.Eugene Garver - 1983 - Teaching Philosophy 6 (2):97-102.
  41.  2
    Introduction.Eugene Garver - 2013 - Polis 30 (2):185-188.
  42. LE Goodman, The God of Abraham and the God of the Philosophers Reviewed by.Eugene Garver - 1997 - Philosophy in Review 17 (6):411-413.
     
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  43.  11
    20 Love Is All You Need: Freedom of Thought versus Freedom of Action.Eugene Garver - 2009 - In Francis J. Mootz (ed.), On Philosophy in American Law. Cambridge University Press. pp. 167.
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  44. Machiavelli and the Politics of Rhetorical Invention.Eugene Garver - 1985 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 14 (2).
     
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  45. Making discourse ethical: The lessons of Aristotle's Rhetoric'.Eugene Garver - 1989 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 5:73-96.
     
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  46.  29
    Machiavelli's "The Prince": A Neglected Rhetorical Classic.Eugene Garver - 1980 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 13 (2):99 - 120.
  47.  13
    Narratice, Rhetorical Argument, and Ethical Authority.Eugene Garver - 1999 - Law and Critique 10 (2):117-146.
    The great challenge of rhetorical argument is to make discourse ethical without making it less logical. This challenge is of central importance throughout the full range of practical argument, and understanding the relation of the ethical to the logical is one of the principal contributions the humanities, in this case the study of rhetoric, can make to legal scholarship. Aristotle’s Rhetoric shows how arguments can be ethical and can create ethical relations between speaker and hearer. I intend to apply Aristotle’s (...)
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  48.  18
    Paradigms and princes.Eugene Garver - 1987 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 17 (1):21-47.
  49.  10
    Pluralism in theory and practice: Richard McKeon and American philosophy.Eugene Garver & Richard Buchanan (eds.) - 2000 - Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press.
    Pluralism in Theory and Practice not only brings McKeon to the attention of contemporary philosophers and students; it also puts his theories into practice. Some of the essays explicate aspects of McKeon's thought or situate him in the context of American intellectual and practical engagement. Others take the concerns he raised as starting points for inquiries into urgent contemporary problems, or, in some cases, for reexamining McKeon's work as fertile ground for shaping the direction of new investigation.
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  50. Pluralism in Theory and Practice: Richard McKeon and American Philosophy.Eugene Garver & Richard Buchanan - 2001 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 37 (3):436-441.
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