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  1.  10
    Health Reform and Theories of Cost Control.Erin C. Fuse Brown - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (4):846-856.
    Health care costs and affordability are critical issues to consumers. Just as we assess the coverage impacts of a health reform proposal, we should be able to evaluate how the plan will constrain health care costs: its theory of cost control. This essay provides a framework to assess health reform plans on their theories of cost control, identifying the key policy tools to constrain health care costs organized in a two-by-two matrix across the following dimensions: price vs. utilization and public (...)
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  2.  18
    Congress, Courts, and Commerce: Upholding the Individual Mandate to Protect the Public's Health.James G. Hodge, Erin C. Fuse Brown, Daniel G. Orenstein & Sarah O'Keefe - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (3):394-400.
    Despite historic efforts to enact the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in 2010, national health reform is threatened by multiple legal challenges grounded in constitutional law. Premier among these claims is the premise that PPACA’s “individual mandate” is constitutionally infirm. Attorneys General in Virginia and Florida allege that Congress’ interstate commerce powers do not authorize federal imposition of the individual mandate because Congress lacks the power to regulate commercial “inactivity.” Stated simply, Congress cannot regulate individuals who choose not to (...)
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    Congress, Courts, and Commerce: Upholding the Individual Mandate to Protect the Public's Health.James G. Hodge, Erin C. Fuse Brown, Daniel G. Orenstein & Sarah O'Keefe - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (3):394-400.
    Among multiple legal challenges to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is the premise that PPACA's “individual mandate” (requiring all individuals to obtain health insurance by 2014 or face civil penalties) is inviolate of Congress' interstate commerce powers because Congress lacks the power to regulate commercial “inactivity.” Several courts initially considering this argument have rejected it, but federal district courts in Virginia and Florida have concurred, leading to numerous appeals and prospective review of the United States Supreme Court. (...)
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