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Eric W. Hagedorn
St. Norbert College
  1. Heavenly "Freedom" in Fourteenth-Century Voluntarism.Eric W. Hagedorn - 2024 - In Sonja Schierbaum & Jörn Müller (eds.), Varieties of Voluntarism in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 199-216.
    According to standard late medieval Christian thought, humans in heaven are unable to sin, having been “confirmed” in their goodness; and, nevertheless, are more free than humans are in the present life. The rise of voluntarist conceptions of the will in the late thirteenth century made it increasingly difficult to hold onto both claims. Peter Olivi suggested that the impeccability of the blessed was dependent upon a special activity of God upon their wills and argued that this external constraint upon (...)
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  2. Ockham's Scientia Argument for Mental Language.Eric W. Hagedorn - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 3:145-168.
    William Ockham held that, in addition to written and spoken language, there exists a mental language, a structured representational system common to all thinking beings. Here I present and evaluate an argument found in several places across Ockham's corpus, wherein he argues that positing a mental language is necessary for the nominalist to meet certain ontological constraints imposed by Aristotle’s account of scientific demonstration.
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  3. On Loving God Contrary to a Divine Command: Demystifying Ockham’s Quodlibet III.14.Eric W. Hagedorn - 2021 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 9:221-244.
    Among the most widely discussed of William of Ockham’s texts on ethics is his Quodlibet III, q. 14. But despite a large literature on this question, there is no consensus on what Ockham’s answer is to the central question raised in it, specifically, what obligations one would have if one were to receive a divine command to not love God. (Surprisingly, there is also little explicit recognition in the literature of this lack of consensus.) Via a close reading of the (...)
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  4. From Thomas Aquinas to the 1350s.Eric W. Hagedorn - 2018 - In Thomas Williams (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Ethics. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 55-76.
    An overview of debates in ethical theory within Christian Scholasticism in the decades after Thomas Aquinas.
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  5. Is Anyone Else Thinking My Thoughts? Aquinas’s Response to the Too-Many-Thinkers Problem.Eric W. Hagedorn - 2010 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:275-286.
    It has been recently argued by a number of metaphysicians—Trenton Merricks and Eric Olson among them—that any variety of dualism that claims that human persons have souls as proper parts (rather than simply being identical to souls) will face a too-many-thinker problem. In this paper, I examine whether this objection applies to the views of Aquinas, who famously claims that human persons are soul-body composites. I go on to argue that a straightforward readingof Aquinas’s texts might lead us to believe (...)
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  6.  36
    The Changing Role of Theological Authority in Ockham's Razor.Eric W. Hagedorn - 2022 - Res Philosophica 99 (2):97-120.
    Ockham’s own formulations of his Razor state that one should only include a given entity in one’s ontology when one has either sensory evidence, demonstrative argument, or theological authority in favor of it. But how does Ockham decide which theological claims to treat as data for theory construction? Here I show how over time (perhaps in no small part due to pressure and attention from ecclesiastical censors) Ockham refined and changed the way he formulated his Razor, particularly the “authority clause” (...)
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  7.  27
    William of Ockham: Questions on Goodness, Virtue, and the Will.Eric W. Hagedorn (ed.) - 2021 - Cambridge University Press.
    In the twenty-seven questions translated in this volume, most never before published in English, William of Ockham considers a host of theological and philosophical issues, including the nature of virtue and vice, the relationship between the intellect and the will, the scope of human freedom, the possibility of God's creating a better world, the role of love and hatred in practical reasoning, whether God could command someone to do wrong, and more.
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  8. Review of The Science of the Soul. The Commentary Tradition on Aristotle’s De anima, c. 1260–c. 1360 by Sander W. de Boer. [REVIEW]Eric W. Hagedorn - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (1):168-169.
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    John Duns Scotus: On being and cognition: Ordinatio 1.3, Edited and Translated by John van den Bercken: Fordham University Press, New York, NY, 2016, ix and 298 pp, $65.00. [REVIEW]Eric Hagedorn & Eric W. Hagedorn - 2019 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 85 (2):255-258.
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  10.  41
    Review of Claude Panaccio, Mental Language: From Plato to William of Ockham. [REVIEW]Eric W. Hagedorn - 2017 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2017.
  11.  29
    Review of Jari Kaukua and Tomas Ekenberg (eds.), Subjectivity and Selfhood in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. [REVIEW]Eric W. Hagedorn - 2016 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2016.