4 found
Order:
  1.  54
    Existential Loneliness and End-of-Life Care: A Systematic Review.Eric J. Ettema, Louise D. Derksen & Evert van Leeuwen - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (2):141-169.
    Patients with a life-threatening illness can be confronted with various types of loneliness, one of which is existential loneliness (EL). Since the experience of EL is extremely disruptive, the issue of EL is relevant for the practice of end-of-life care. Still, the literature on EL has generated little discussion and empirical substantiation and has never been systematically reviewed. In order to systematically review the literature, we (1) identified the existential loneliness literature; (2) established an organising framework for the review; (3) (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2.  32
    Death: 'Nothing' Gives Insight.Eric J. Ettema - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):575-585.
    According to a widely accepted belief, we cannot know our own death—death means ‘nothing’ to us. At first sight, the meaning of ‘nothing’ just implies the negation or absence of ‘something’. Death then simply refers to the negation or absence of life. As a consequence, however, death has no meaning of itself. This leads to an ontological paradox in which death is both acknowledged and denied: death is … nothing. In this article, I investigate whether insight into the ontological paradox (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  19
    Advancing the Debate About Heidegger’s Phenomenology of Death as a Possibility.Eric J. Ettema, Louise D. Derksen & Evert van Leeuwen - 2015 - Open Journal of Philosophy 5 (7):445-458.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  71
    Existential Loneliness and End-of-Life Care: A Systematic Review.Eric J. Ettema, Louise D. Derksen & Evert Leeuwen - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (2):141-169.
    Patients with a life-threatening illness can be confronted with various types of loneliness, one of which is existential loneliness (EL). Since the experience of EL is extremely disruptive, the issue of EL is relevant for the practice of end-of-life care. Still, the literature on EL has generated little discussion and empirical substantiation and has never been systematically reviewed. In order to systematically review the literature, we (1) identified the existential loneliness literature; (2) established an organising framework for the review; (3) (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations