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  1.  29
    Indigenous Knowledge in a Postgenomic Landscape: The Politics of Epigenetic Hope and Reparation in Australia.Maurizio Meloni, Emma Kowal & Megan Warin - 2020 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 45 (1):87-111.
    A history of colonization inflicts psychological, physical, and structural disadvantages that endure across generations. For an increasing number of Indigenous Australians, environmental epigenetics offers an important explanatory framework that links the social past with the biological present, providing a culturally relevant way of understanding the various intergenerational effects of historical trauma. In this paper, we critically examine the strategic uptake of environmental epigenetics by Indigenous researchers and policy advocates. We focus on the relationship between epigenetic processes and Indigenous views of (...)
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  2.  18
    Circuits of Time: Enacting Postgenomics in Indigenous Australia.Henrietta Byrne, Emma Kowal, Jaya Keaney & Megan Warin - 2023 - Body and Society 29 (2):20-48.
    Some Indigenous Australians have embraced developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) and epigenetic discourses to highlight the legacies of slow violence in a settler colonial context. Despite important differences between Indigenous and scientific knowledges, some Indigenous scholars are positioning DOHaD and epigenetics as a resource to benefit their communities. This article argues that time plays a crucial role of brokering disparate knowledge spaces in Indigenous discourses of postgenomics, with both Indigenous cosmological frames and DOHaD/epigenetics centring a circular temporal model. (...)
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  3.  24
    Genetic Research and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.Emma Kowal, Glenn Pearson, Chris S. Peacock, Sarra E. Jamieson & Jenefer M. Blackwell - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (4):419-432.
    While human genetic research promises to deliver a range of health benefits to the population, genetic research that takes place in Indigenous communities has proven controversial. Indigenous peoples have raised concerns, including a lack of benefit to their communities, a diversion of attention and resources from non-genetic causes of health disparities and racism in health care, a reinforcement of “victim-blaming” approaches to health inequalities, and possible misuse of blood and tissue samples. Drawing on the international literature, this article reviews the (...)
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  4.  53
    Refusing epigenetics: indigeneity and the colonial politics of trauma.Emma Kowal, Megan Warin, Henrietta Byrne & Jaya Keaney - 2023 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 46 (1):1-23.
    Environmental epigenetics is increasingly employed to understand the health outcomes of communities who have experienced historical trauma and structural violence. Epigenetics provides a way to think about traumatic events and sustained deprivation as biological “exposures” that contribute to ill-health across generations. In Australia, some Indigenous researchers and clinicians are embracing epigenetic science as a framework for theorising the slow violence of colonialism as it plays out in intergenerational legacies of trauma and illness. However, there is dispute, contention, and caution as (...)
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  5.  16
    Erratum to: Genetic Research and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.Emma Kowal, Glenn Pearson, Lobna Rouhani, Chris S. Peacock, Sarra E. Jamieson & Jenefer M. Blackwell - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):403-403.
    Erratum to: Bioethical InquiryDOI 10.1007/s11673-012-9391-xLobna Rouhani, University of Melbourne, is a co-author of the article “Genetic Research and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians” (2012, 419–432) that was published in the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry’s 9(4) symposium “Cases and Culture.” Her name was omitted from the publication and she should be credited as the third author of this article.
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