Results for 'Emily Sadecki'

991 found
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  1.  15
    US adults’ preferences for race-based and place-based prioritisation for COVID-19 vaccines.Harald Schmidt, Sonia Jawaid Shaikh, Emily Sadecki & Sarah Gollust - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (7):497-500.
    Implementing equity principles in resource allocation is challenging. In one approach, some US states implemented race-based prioritisation of COVID-19 vaccines in response to vast racial inequities in COVID-19 outcomes, while others used place-based allocation. In a nationally representative survey of n=2067 US residents, fielded in mid-April 2021, we explored the public acceptability of race-based prioritisation compared with place-based prioritisation, by offering vaccines to harder hit zip codes before residents of other zip codes. We found that in general, a majority of (...)
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  2.  12
    Public attitudes about equitable COVID-19 vaccine allocation: a randomised experiment of race-based versus novel place-based frames.Harald Schmidt, Sonia Jawaid Shaikh, Emily Sadecki, Alison Buttenheim & Sarah Gollust - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (12):993-999.
    Equity was—and is—central in the US policy response to COVID-19, given its disproportionate impact on disadvantaged communities of colour. In an unprecedented turn, the majority of US states used place-based disadvantage indices to promote equity in vaccine allocation (eg, through larger vaccine shares for more disadvantaged areas and people of colour).We conducted a nationally representative survey experiment (n=2003) in April 2021 (before all US residents had become vaccine eligible), that examined respondents’ perceptions of the acceptability of disadvantage indices relative to (...)
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  3.  48
    Representation and productive ambiguity in mathematics and the sciences.Emily Grosholz - 2007 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Viewed this way, the texts yield striking examples of language and notation that are irreducibly ambiguous and productive because they are ambiguous.
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  4.  87
    The inegalitarian ethos: Incentives, respect, and self-respect.Emily McTernan - 2013 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 12 (1):93-111.
    In Cohen’s vision of the just society, there would be no need for unequalizing incentives so as to benefit the least well-off; instead, people would be motivated by an egalitarian ethos to work hard and in the most socially productive jobs. As such, Cohen appears to offer a way to mitigate the trade-off of equality for efficiency that often characterizes theorizing about distributive justice. This article presents an egalitarian challenge to Cohen’s vision of the just society. I argue that a (...)
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  5.  51
    Anne Conway as a Priority Monist: A Reply to Gordon-Roth.Emily Thomas - 2020 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 6 (3):275-284.
    For early modern metaphysician Anne Conway, the world comprises creatures. In some sense, Conway is a monist about creatures: all creatures are one. Yet, as Jessica Gordon-Roth has astutely pointed out, that monism can be understood in very different ways. One might read Conway as an ‘existence pluralist’: creatures are all composed of the same type of substance, but many substances exist. Alternatively, one might read Conway as an ‘existence monist’: there is only one created substance. Gordon-Roth has done the (...)
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  6. Can Epistemic Virtues Help Combat Epistemologies of Ignorance?Emily McWilliams - 2019 - In Stacey Goguen & Benjamin Sherman (eds.), Overcoming Epistemic Injustice: Social and Psychological Perspectives. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Empirical psychology documents widespread evidence of bias in the ways that people select, interpret, and selectively interpret evidence in forming and revising their beliefs. These biases can function to create and perpetuate epistemologies of ignorance. I argue that virtue epistemology can help us explain what goes epistemically wrong in these cases, and can offer positive advice, orienting us toward ways to right it. In particular, I defend the virtue approach from epistemic situationist worries about the empirical plausibility of individual agents' (...)
     
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  7. Renaissance Theories of Body, Soul, and Mind.Emily Michael - 2002 - In John P. Wright & Paul Potter (eds.), Psyche and Soma: Physicians and Metaphysicians on the Mind-Body Problem From Antiquity to Enlightenment. Clarendon Press.
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  8. Rape Myths, Catastrophe, and Credibility.Emily C. R. Tilton - 2022 - Episteme:1-17.
    There is an undeniable tendency to dismiss women’s sexual assault allegations out of hand. However, this tendency is not monolithic—allegations that black men have raped white women are often met with deadly seriousness. I argue that contemporary rape culture is characterized by the interplay between rape myths that minimize rape, and myths that catastrophize rape. Together, these two sets of rape myths distort the epistemic resources that people use when assessing rape allegations. These distortions result in the unjust exoneration of (...)
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  9. Evidentialism and belief polarization.Emily C. McWilliams - 2021 - Synthese 198 (8):7165-7196.
    Belief polarization occurs when subjects who disagree about some matter of fact are exposed to a mixed body of evidence that bears on that dispute. While we might expect mutual exposure to common evidence to mitigate disagreement, since the evidence available to subjects comes to consist increasingly of items they have in common, this is not what happens. The subjects’ initial disagreement becomes more pronounced because each person increases confidence in her antecedent belief. Kelly aims to identify the mechanisms that (...)
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  10. Not What I Agreed To: Content and Consent.Emily C. R. Tilton & Jonathan Ichikawa - 2021 - Ethics 132 (1):127–154.
    Deception sometimes results in nonconsensual sex. A recent body of literature diagnoses such violations as invalidating consent: the agreement is not morally transformative, which is why the sexual contact is a rights violation. We pursue a different explanation for the wrongs in question: there is valid consent, but it is not consent to the sex act that happened. Semantic conventions play a key role in distinguishing deceptions that result in nonconsensual sex (like stealth condom removal) from those that don’t (like (...)
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  11.  78
    The growth of mathematical knowledge.Emily Grosholz & Herbert Breger (eds.) - 2000 - Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    This book draws its inspiration from Hilbert, Wittgenstein, Cavaillès and Lakatos and is designed to reconfigure contemporary philosophy of mathematics by making the growth of knowledge rather than its foundations central to the study of mathematical rationality, and by analyzing the notion of growth in historical as well as logical terms. Not a mere compendium of opinions, it is organised in dialogical forms, with each philosophical thesis answered by one or more historical case studies designed to support, complicate or question (...)
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  12. Heidegger's Alternative History of Time.Emily Stendera Hughes & Marilyn Stendera - 2024 - New York: Routledge. Edited by Marilyn Stendera.
    This book reconstructs Heidegger’s philosophy of time by reading his work with and against a series of key interlocutors that he nominates as being central to his own critical history of time. In doing so, it explains what makes time of such significance for Heidegger and argues that Heidegger can contribute to contemporary debates in the philosophy of time. Time is a central concern for Heidegger, yet his thinking on the subject is fragmented, making it difficult to grasp its depth, (...)
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  13. Meaninglessness and monotony in pandemic boredom.Emily Hughes - 2023 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences (5):1105-1119.
    Boredom is an affective experience that can involve pervasive feelings of meaninglessness, emptiness, restlessness, frustration, weariness and indifference, as well as the slowing down of time. An increasing focus of research in many disciplines, interest in boredom has been intensified by the recent Covid-19 pandemic, where social distancing measures have induced both a widespread loss of meaning and a significant disturbance of temporal experience. This article explores the philosophical significance of this aversive experience of ‘pandemic boredom.’ Using Heidegger’s work as (...)
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  14.  5
    Turning: reflections on the experience of conversion.Emilie Griffin - 1980 - Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday.
  15.  99
    A new view of mathematical knowledge.Emily Grosholz - 1985 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 36 (1):71-78.
  16.  38
    The philosophy of play.Emily Ryall (ed.) - 2013 - Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.
    Play is a vital component of the social life and well-being of both children and adults. This book examines the concept of play and considers a variety of the related philosophical issues. It also includes meta-analyses from a range of philosophers and theorists, as well as an exploration of some key applied ethical considerations. The main objective of The Philosophy of Play is to provide a richer understanding of the concept and nature of play and its relation to human life (...)
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  17.  60
    How apes get into and out of joint actions.Emilie Genty, Raphaela Heesen, Jean-Pascal Guéry, Federico Rossano, Klaus Zuberbühler & Adrian Bangerter - 2020 - Interaction Studies 21 (3):353-386.
    Compared to other animals, humans appear to have a special motivation to share experiences and mental states with others (Clark, 2006; Grice, 1975), which enables them to enter a condition of ‘we’ or shared intentionality (Tomasello & Carpenter, 2005). Shared intentionality has been suggested to be an evolutionary response to unique problems faced in complex joint action coordination (Levinson, 2006; Tomasello, Carpenter, Call, Behne, & Moll, 2005) and to be unique to humans (Tomasello, 2014). The theoretical and empirical bases for (...)
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  18.  25
    How apes get into and out of joint actions : Shared intentionality as an interactional achievement.Emilie Genty, Raphaela Heesen, Jean-Pascal Guéry, Federico Rossano, Klaus Zuberbühler & Adrian Bangerter - 2020 - Interaction Studies 21 (3):353-386.
    Compared to other animals, humans appear to have a special motivation to share experiences and mental states with others (Clark, 2006; Grice, 1975), which enables them to enter a condition of ‘we’ or shared intentionality (Tomasello & Carpenter, 2005). Shared intentionality has been suggested to be an evolutionary response to unique problems faced in complex joint action coordination (Levinson, 2006; Tomasello, Carpenter, Call, Behne, & Moll, 2005) and to be unique to humans (Tomasello, 2014). The theoretical and empirical bases for (...)
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  19. Detachment in Buddhist Ethics: Apatheia, Ataraxia, and Equanimity.Emily McRae - 2018 - In Gordon F. Davis (ed.), Ethics Without Self, Dharma Without Atman: Western and Buddhist Philosophical Traditions in Dialogue. Cham: Springer Verlag.
    Both Stoic and Buddhist ethics are deeply concerned with the ethical dangers of attachments. Three dangers stand out: (1) the destructive consequences of overwhelming emotionality, brought on by attachment, both for oneself and others, (2) the dangers to one's agency posed by strongly held, but ultimately unstable, attachments, and (3) the threat to virtuous emotional engagement with others caused by one's own attachment to them. The first two kinds of moral dangers have informed Stoic models of detachment (see Wong (2006). (...)
     
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  20.  18
    Theorie.Emilie Gomart - 2005 - Krisis 6 (4):95-100.
  21. Laws of Nature as Constraints.Emily Adlam - 2022 - Foundations of Physics 52 (1):1-41.
    The laws of nature have come a long way since the time of Newton: quantum mechanics and relativity have given us good reasons to take seriously the possibility of laws which may be non-local, atemporal, ‘all-at-once,’ retrocausal, or in some other way not well-suited to the standard dynamical time evolution paradigm. Laws of this kind can be accommodated within a Humean approach to lawhood, but many extant non-Humean approaches face significant challenges when we try to apply them to laws outside (...)
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  22. "That's Above My Paygrade": Woke Excuses for Ignorance.Emily C. R. Tilton - forthcoming - Philosophers' Imprint.
    Standpoint theorists have long been clear that marginalization does not make better understanding a given. They have been less clear, though, that social dominance does not make ignorance a given. Indeed, many standpoint theorists have implicitly committed themselves to what I call the strong epistemic disadvantage thesis. According to this thesis, there are strong, substantive limits on what the socially dominant can know about oppression that they do not personally experience. I argue that this thesis is not just implausible but (...)
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  23.  23
    Information is Physical: Cross-Perspective Links in Relational Quantum Mechanics.Emily Adlam & Carlo Rovelli - 2023 - Philosophy of Physics 1 (1).
    Relational quantum mechanics (RQM) is an interpretation of quantum mechanics based on the idea that quantum states do not describe an absolute property of a system but rather a relationship between systems. There have recently been some criticisms of RQM pertaining to issues around intersubjectivity. In this article, we show how RQM can address these criticisms by adding a new postulate which requires that all of the information possessed by a certain observer is stored in physical variables of that observer (...)
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  24. Cognitive Transformation, Dementia, and the Moral Weight of Advance Directives.Emily Walsh - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (8):54-64.
    Dementia patients in the moderate-late stage of the disease can, and often do, express different preferences than they did at the onset of their condition. The received view in the philosophical literature argues that advance directives which prioritize the patient’s preferences at onset ought to be given decisive moral weight in medical decision-making. Clinical practice, on the other hand, favors giving moral weight to the preferences expressed by dementia patients after onset. The purpose of this article is to show that (...)
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  25.  18
    New but for whom? Discourses of innovation in precision agriculture.Emily Duncan, Alesandros Glaros, Dennis Z. Ross & Eric Nost - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (4):1181-1199.
    We describe how the set of tools, practices, and social relations known as “precision agriculture” is defined, promoted, and debated. To do so, we perform a critical discourse analysis of popular and trade press websites. Promoters of precision agriculture champion how big data analytics, automated equipment, and decision-support software will optimize yields in the face of narrow margins and public concern about farming’s environmental impacts. At its core, however, the idea of farmers leveraging digital infrastructure in their operations is not (...)
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  26.  2
    Stig S. Frøland, Duel without End: Mankind's Battle with Microbes(trans. John Irons) London: Reaktion Books, 2022. Pp. 632. ISBN: 978-1-78914-505-2. £30.00 GBP (paperback). [REVIEW]Emily Webster - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Science:1-2.
  27.  15
    Women and Childrearing in the Republic.Emily Fletcher - 2021 - In Isabelle Chouinard, Zoe McConaughey, Aline Medeiros Ramos & Roxane Noël (eds.), Women’s Perspectives on Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. pp. 91-99.
    Scholars have long puzzled about how to reconcile the proposal in Republic V that women should share the education and work of men, including ruling, with the deeply misogynistic comments found in the Republic and throughout Plato’s corpus. Even those who doubt that the proposal represents a sincere recognition of the women’s equality with men must provide a plausible explanation for this radical departure from the norms of Plato’s day. Taking inspiration from Annie Larivée’s application of Michèle Le Doeuff’s notion (...)
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  28.  44
    Objectivity in the Eye of the Beholder: Divergent Perceptions of Bias in Self Versus Others.Emily Pronin, Thomas Gilovich & Lee Ross - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (3):781-799.
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  29. Equanimity in Relationship: Responding to Moral Ugliness.Emily McRae - 2017 - In A Mirror is For Reflection: Contemporary Perspectives of Buddhist Ethics. New York, NY, USA:
    In the Buddhist ethical traditions, equanimity along with love, compassion, and sympathetic joy form what are called the four boundless qualities, which are affective states one cultivates for moral and spiritual development. But there is a sense in which equanimity seems very unlike the three others: love, compassion, and sympathetic joy all imply an emotional investment in others, whereas equanimity seems to imply an absence of such investment. This observation has provoked debate as to how to properly understand the relationship (...)
     
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  30. Descartes and Galileo : the quantificatin of time and force.Emily Grosholz - 1991 - In Jules Vuillemin & Rushdī Rāshid (eds.), Mathématiques et philosophie de l'antiquité à l'age classique: hommage à Jules Vuillemin. Paris: Diffusion, Presses du CNRS.
  31.  13
    Burning Incense, Pledging Sisterhood.Emily Honig - 1995 - In Penny A. Weiss & Marilyn Friedman (eds.), Feminism and community. Philadelphia: Temple University Press. pp. 59.
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  32.  8
    Dreamland of humanists: Warburg, Cassirer, Panofsky, and the Hamburg school.Emily J. Levine - 2013 - London: University of Chicago Press.
    Dreamland of humanists -- Culture, commerce, and the city -- Warburg's Renaissance and the things in between -- University as "gateway to the world" -- Warburg, Cassirer, and the conditions of reason -- Socrates in Hamburg? Panofsky and the economics of scholarship -- Iconology and the Hamburg school -- Private Jews, public Germans -- Cassirer's cosmopolitan nationalism -- The enlightened rector and the politics of enlightenment -- The Hamburg America line: exiles as exports -- Epilogue: Nachleben of an idea.
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  33.  10
    Reconceiving reason.Emily Robertson - 1995 - In Wendy Kohli (ed.), Critical conversations in philosophy of education. New York: Routledge. pp. 116--126.
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  34. Standpoint Epistemology and the Epistemology of Deference (3rd edition).Emily Tilton & Briana Toole - forthcoming - In Kurt Sylvan, Sosa Ernest, Dancy Jonathan & Steup Matthias (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Epistemology. Wiley Blackwell.
    Standpoint epistemology has been linked with increasing calls for deference to the socially marginalized. As we understand it, deference involves recognizing someone else as better positioned than we are, either to investigate or to answer some question, and then accepting their judgment as our own. We connect contemporary calls for deference to old objections that standpoint epistemology wrongly reifies differences between groups. We also argue that while deferential epistemic norms present themselves as a solution to longstanding injustices, habitual deference prevents (...)
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  35.  37
    The causal situationist account of constitutive relevance.Emily Prychitko - 2019 - Synthese 198 (2):1829-1843.
    An epistemic account of constitutive relevance lists the criteria by which scientists can identify the components of mechanisms in empirical practice. Three prominent claims from Craver form a promising basis for an account. First, constitutive relevance is established by means of interlevel experiments. Second, interlevel experiments are executions of interventions. Third, there is no interlevel causation between a mechanism and its components. Currently, no account on offer respects all three claims. I offer my causal situationist account of constitutive relevance that (...)
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  36.  32
    Does science need intersubjectivity? The problem of confirmation in orthodox interpretations of quantum mechanics.Emily Adlam - 2022 - Synthese 200 (6):1–39.
    Any successful interpretation of quantum mechanics must explain how our empirical evidence allows us to come to know about quantum mechanics. In this article, we argue that this vital criterion is not met by the class of ‘orthodox interpretations,’ which includes QBism, neo-Copenhagen interpretations, and some versions of relational quantum mechanics. We demonstrate that intersubjectivity fails in radical ways in these approaches, and we explain why intersubjectivity matters for empirical confirmation. We take a detailed look at the way in which (...)
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  37.  55
    Determinism beyond time evolution.Emily Adlam - 2022 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 12 (4):1-36.
    Physicists are increasingly beginning to take seriously the possibility of laws outside the traditional time-evolution paradigm; yet many popular definitions of determinism are still predicated on a time-evolution picture, making them manifestly unsuited to the diverse range of research programmes in modern physics. In this article, we use a constraint-based framework to set out a generalization of determinism which does not presuppose temporal evolution, distinguishing between strong, weak and delocalised holistic determinism. We discuss some interesting consequences of these generalized notions (...)
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  38.  34
    Science demands explanation, religion tolerates mystery.Emily G. Liquin, S. Emlen Metz & Tania Lombrozo - 2020 - Cognition 204 (C):104398.
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  39.  19
    What Does ‘(Non)-absoluteness of Observed Events’ Mean?Emily Adlam - 2024 - Foundations of Physics 54 (1):1-43.
    Recently there have emerged an assortment of theorems relating to the ‘absoluteness of emerged events,’ and these results have sometimes been used to argue that quantum mechanics may involve some kind of metaphysically radical non-absoluteness, such as relationalism or perspectivalism. However, in our view a close examination of these theorems fails to convincingly support such possibilities. In this paper we argue that the Wigner’s friend paradox, the theorem of Bong et al and the theorem of Lawrence et al are all (...)
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  40.  51
    Foundations of Quantum Mechanics.Emily Adlam - 2021 - Cambridge University Press.
    Quantum mechanics is an extraordinarily successful scientific theory. But more than 100 years after it was first introduced, the interpretation of the theory remains controversial. This Element introduces some of the most puzzling questions at the foundations of quantum mechanics and provides an up-to-date and forward-looking survey of the most prominent ways in which physicists and philosophers of physics have attempted to resolve them. Topics covered include nonlocality, contextuality, the reality of the wavefunction and the measurement problem. The discussion is (...)
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  41.  81
    From Technological Autonomy to Technological Bluff: Jacques Ellul and Our Technological Condition.J. Craig Hanks & Emily Kay Hanks - 2015 - Human Affairs 25 (4):460-470.
    The work of Jacques Ellul is useful in understanding and evaluating the implications of rapidly changing technologies for human values and democracy. Ellul developed three powerful theses about technology: technological autonomy, technological determinism, and technological bluff. In this essay, the authors explicate these views of technology, and place the work of Ellul in dialogue with the ides of other important theorists of technology. Ellul’s too-often overlooked theses about technology are relevant to our present technological society.
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  42. Experiments, Simulations, and Epistemic Privilege.Emily C. Parke - 2014 - Philosophy of Science 81 (4):516-536.
    Experiments are commonly thought to have epistemic privilege over simulations. Two ideas underpin this belief: first, experiments generate greater inferential power than simulations, and second, simulations cannot surprise us the way experiments can. In this article I argue that neither of these claims is true of experiments versus simulations in general. We should give up the common practice of resting in-principle judgments about the epistemic value of cases of scientific inquiry on whether we classify those cases as experiments or simulations, (...)
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  43. Two roads to retrocausality.Emily Adlam - 2022 - Synthese 200 (5):1-36.
    In recent years the quantum foundations community has seen increasing interest in the possibility of using retrocausality as a route to rejecting the conclusions of Bell’s theorem and restoring locality to quantum physics. On the other hand, it has also been argued that accepting nonlocality leads to a form of retrocausality. In this article we seek to elucidate the relationship between retrocausality and locality. We begin by providing a brief schema of the various ways in which violations of Bell’s inequalities (...)
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  44.  42
    Is there causation in fundamental physics? New insights from process matrices and quantum causal modelling.Emily Adlam - 2023 - Synthese 201 (5):1-40.
    In this article we set out to understand the significance of the process matrix formalism and the quantum causal modelling programme for ongoing disputes about the role of causation in fundamental physics. We argue that the process matrix programme has correctly identified a notion of ‘causal order’ which plays an important role in fundamental physics, but this notion is weaker than the common-sense conception of causation because it does not involve asymmetry. We argue that causal order plays an important role (...)
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  45.  35
    Thematic relations in adults' concepts.Emilie L. Lin & Gregory L. Murphy - 2001 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (1):3.
  46. The problem of confirmation in the Everett interpretation.Emily Adlam - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 47:21-32.
    I argue that the Oxford school Everett interpretation is internally incoherent, because we cannot claim that in an Everettian universe the kinds of reasoning we have used to arrive at our beliefs about quantum mechanics would lead us to form true beliefs. I show that in an Everettian context, the experimental evidence that we have available could not provide empirical confirmation for quantum mechanics, and moreover that we would not even be able to establish reference to the theoretical entities of (...)
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  47. Rene Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy (1641).Emily R. Grosholz - 2003 - In Jorge J. E. Gracia, Gregory M. Reichberg & Bernard N. Schumacher (eds.), The Classics of Western Philosophy: A Reader's Guide. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 217.
     
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  48. Alternative ways of implementing the curriculum.Emily Ndlovu Mangwaya & Simon Bheki Khoza - 2021 - In Kehdinga George Fomunyam & Simon Bheki Khoza (eds.), Curriculum Theory, Curriculum Theorising, and the Theoriser: The African Theorising Perspective. Boston: Brill | Sense.
     
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  49.  19
    John Wyclif's atomism.Emily Michael - 2009 - In Christophe Grellard & Aurélien Robert (eds.), Atomism in late medieval philosophy and theology. Boston: Brill. pp. 9--183.
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  50.  47
    Operational theories as structural realism.Emily Adlam - 2022 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 94 (C):99-111.
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