Results for 'Emily R. Fyfe'

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  1.  33
    Feedback influences children's reasoning about math equivalence: A meta-analytic review.Emily R. Fyfe & Sarah A. Brown - 2018 - Thinking and Reasoning 24 (2):157-178.
    Decades of research have focused on children's reasoning about math equivalence problems for both practical and theoretical insights. Not only are math equivalence problems foundational in arithmetic and algebra, they also represent a class of problems on which children's thinking is resistant to change. Feedback is one instructional tool that can serve as a key trigger of cognitive change. In this paper, we review all experimental studies on the effects of feedback on children's understanding of math equivalence. Meta-analytic results indicate (...)
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  2.  8
    Generalizability, transferability, and the practice-to-practice gap.Joshua R. de Leeuw, Benjamin A. Motz, Emily R. Fyfe, Paulo F. Carvalho & Robert L. Goldstone - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45.
    Emphasizing the predictive success and practical utility of psychological science is an admirable goal but it will require a substantive shift in how we design research. Applied research often assumes that findings are transferable to all practices, insensitive to variation between implementations. We describe efforts to quantify and close this practice-to-practice gap in education research.
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  3.  1
    “The eyes are the window to the representation”: Linking gaze to memory precision and decision weights in object discrimination tasks.Emily R. Weichart, Layla Unger, Nicole King, Vladimir M. Sloutsky & Brandon M. Turner - forthcoming - Psychological Review.
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  4. Representation and Productive Ambiguity in Mathematics and the Sciences.Emily R. Grosholz - 2006 - Studia Leibnitiana 38 (2):244-246.
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  5.  12
    As within, so without, as above, so below: Common mechanisms can support between- and within-trial category learning dynamics.Emily R. Weichart, Matthew Galdo, Vladimir M. Sloutsky & Brandon M. Turner - 2022 - Psychological Review 129 (5):1104-1143.
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  6.  21
    The partial unification of domains, hybrids, and the growth of mathematical knowledge.Emily R. Grosholz - 2000 - In Emily Grosholz & Herbert Breger (eds.), The growth of mathematical knowledge. Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 81--91.
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  7. The death of Socrates.Emily R. Wilson - 2007 - Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
    Introduction: The man who drank the hemlock -- Socrates' philosophy -- Politics and society -- Plato and others : who created the death of Socrates? -- 'A Greek chatterbox' : the death of Socrates in the Roman Empire -- Pain and revelation : the death of Socrates and the death of Jesus -- The apotheosis of philosophy : from enlightenment to revolution -- Talk, truth, totalitarianism : the problem of Socrates in modern times.
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  8. Cartesian method and the problem of reduction.Emily R. Grosholz - 1994 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 184 (1):119-121.
     
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  9.  19
    Individualism, diversity and unity: Goals in tension in public education.Emily R. Gill - 2005 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (3):549–558.
    This review essay examines three recent books addressing recurring or current controversies in public education. One is historically based, a second focuses on a range of questions, and the third concentrates on the single issue of school choice. All of them, however, may be read against a backdrop of tension among three enduring liberal democratic values: individualism, diversity and unity. Public education is surely aimed at individual success and at preparing future adults to make choices, ideally among a range of (...)
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  10.  15
    Individualism, Diversity and Unity: Goals in Tension in Public Education.Emily R. Gill - 2005 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (3):549-558.
    This review essay examines three recent books addressing recurring or current controversies in public education. One is historically based, a second focuses on a range of questions, and the third concentrates on the single issue of school choice. All of them, however, may be read against a backdrop of tension among three enduring liberal democratic values: individualism, diversity and unity. Public education is surely aimed at individual success and at preparing future adults to make choices, ideally among a range of (...)
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  11.  12
    Individualism, Diversity and Unity: Goals in Tension in Public Education.Emily R. Gill - 2005 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (3):549-558.
    This review essay examines three recent books addressing recurring or current controversies in public education. One is historically based, a second focuses on a range of questions, and the third concentrates on the single issue of school choice. All of them, however, may be read against a backdrop of tension among three enduring liberal democratic values: individualism, diversity and unity. Public education is surely aimed at individual success and at preparing future adults to make choices, ideally among a range of (...)
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  12.  77
    Critical studies/book reviews.Emily R. Grosholz - 2001 - Philosophia Mathematica 9 (2):79-80.
  13.  18
    Investigating the shape bias in typically developing children and children with autism spectrum disorders.Emily R. Potrzeba, Deborah Fein & Letitia Naigles - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  14. Alan S. Rosenbaum, ed., Constitutionalism: The Philosophical Dimension Reviewed by.Emily R. Gill - 1989 - Philosophy in Review 9 (5):194-196.
  15. Michael P. Zuckert, Natural Rights and the New Republicanism Reviewed by.Emily R. Gill - 1995 - Philosophy in Review 15 (2):148-150.
     
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  16. Nancy L. Rosenblum, ed., Liberalism and the Moral Life Reviewed by.Emily R. Gill - 1990 - Philosophy in Review 10 (10):433-435.
  17. Responsibility and Choice in Robert Nozick: Sins of Commission and of Omission.Emily R. Gill - 1978 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 59 (4):344.
     
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  18.  16
    Religion, civic values, and equal citizenship in the liberal democratic polity.Emily R. Gill - 2013 - The Politics and Religion Journal 7 (2):235-260.
    Whether religious and other voluntary associations should reflect public values is a subject of controversy. Corey Brettschneider argues that the state should assert its own values of free and equal citizenship, deliberately attempting to transform the beliefs of illiberal groups through court decisions and through selective withdrawal of tax exemptions. I argue, however, that as long as individuals and groups comply with the law, it is not the business of the state to change their beliefs. Moreover, public authority itself does (...)
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  19. Wendy Donner, The Liberal Self: John Stuart Mill's Moral and Political Philosophy Reviewed by.Emily R. Gill - 1992 - Philosophy in Review 12 (4):239-241.
     
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  20.  10
    Mirrors of the divine: late ancient Christianity and the vision of God.Emily R. Cain - 2023 - New York, NY, United States of America: Oxford University Press.
    There has long been a curious fascination with eyes and mirrors as evident throughout art, film, and literature. From fantastical characters who shoot lasers from their eyes to those whose memories are altered visually, the way in which a story portrays the function of the eyes demonstrates the way the storyteller imagines the character's relationship to the world. Is the character powerful or powerless? Does she impact her world or is she impacted by that world? The storyteller's portrayal of vision (...)
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  21.  10
    A model of dynamic, within-trial conflict resolution for decision making.Emily R. Weichart, Brandon M. Turner & Per B. Sederberg - 2020 - Psychological Review 127 (5):749-777.
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  22.  21
    Updating perceptual expectations as certainty diminishes.Emily R. Thomas, Kirsten Rittershofer & Clare Press - 2023 - Cognition 232 (C):105356.
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  23.  24
    A Diverse and Flexible Teaching Toolkit Facilitates the Human Capacity for Cumulative Culture.Emily R. R. Burdett, Lewis G. Dean & Samuel Ronfard - 2018 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 9 (4):807-818.
    Human culture is uniquely complex compared to other species. This complexity stems from the accumulation of culture over time through high- and low-fidelity transmission and innovation. One possible reason for why humans retain and create culture, is our ability to modulate teaching strategies in order to foster learning and innovation. We argue that teaching is more diverse, flexible, and complex in humans than in other species. This particular characteristic of human teaching rather than teaching itself is one of the reasons (...)
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  24. Descartes' unification of algebra and geometry.Emily R. Grosholz - 1980 - In Stephen Gaukroger (ed.), Descartes: Philosophy, Mathematics and Physics. Barnes & Noble. pp. 156--68.
  25.  18
    Narrative methods for assessing “quality of life” in hand transplantation: five case studies with bioethical commentary.Emily R. Herrington & Lisa S. Parker - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (3):407-425.
    Despite having paved the way for face, womb and penis transplants, hand transplantation today remains a small hybrid of reconstructive microsurgery and transplant immunology. An exceptionally limited patient population internationally complicates medical researchers’ efforts to parse outcomes “objectively.” Presumed functional and psychosocial benefits of gaining a transplant hand must be weighed in both patient decisions and bioethical discussions against the difficulty of adhering to post-transplant medications, the physical demands of hand transplant recovery on the patient, and the serious long-term health (...)
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  26.  12
    Two English Translations of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex.Emily R. Grosholz - 2017 - In Laura Hengehold & Nancy Bauer (eds.), A Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 59–70.
    This chapter treats the reception and assessment of the two English translations of Simone de Beauvoir's Le deuxième sexe, the first by Howard M. Parshley in 1953 and the second by Constance Borde and Sheila Malovany‐Chevallier in 2009. We examine both the criticisms and the appreciations, concluding that the second is superior in many ways to the first. On that basis, we propose a digital edition of the original book and its earlier drafts en face the 2009 English translation, which (...)
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  27. The Legacy of Simone de Beauvoir.Emily R. Grosholz - 2005 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 195 (3):384-386.
     
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  28.  13
    More on Social Darwinism.Emily R. Grace & M. F. Ashley Montagu - 1942 - Science and Society 6 (1):71 - 78.
  29.  27
    More on Social Darwinism.Emily R. Grace & Mf Ashley Montagu - forthcoming - Science and Society.
  30.  63
    A Case Study in the Application of Mathematics to Physics: Descartes' Principles of Philosophy, Part II.Emily R. Grosholz - 1986 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:116 - 124.
    The question of how and why mathematics can be applied to physical reality should be approached through the history of science, as a series of case studies which may reveal both generalizable patterns and salient differences in the grounds and nature of that application from era to era. The present examination of Descartes' Principles of Philosophy Part II, reveals a deep ambiguity in the relation of Euclidean geometry to res extensa, and a tension between geometrical form and 'common motion of (...)
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  31.  8
    A Case Study in the Applioation of Mathematics to Physics: Descartes’ Principles Of Philosophy, Part II.Emily R. Grosholz - 1986 - PSA Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986 (1):116-124.
    The question of how and why the application of mathematics to physical reality is possible has occupied philosophers for many centuries. In contemporary discussions, Philip Kitcher’s attack on a priorist approaches to the question is particularly interesting, for it suggests that there is no global answer (Kitcher 1983, Chapters 1-4). In this essay, I would like to develop his insight by arguing, first, that the problem of how mathematics relates to physical reality should be addressed by an appeal to the (...)
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  32.  23
    Berzelian formulas as generative paper tools.Emily R. Grosholz - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (2):411-417.
  33. G.W. Leibniz, Interrelations Between Mathematics and Philosophy.Emily R. Grosholz (ed.) - 2015 - Springer Verlag.
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  34.  44
    Geometry, Time and Force in the Diagrams of Descartes, Galileo, Torricelli and Newton.Emily R. Grosholz - 1988 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:237 - 248.
    Cartesian method both organizes and impoverishes the domains to which Descartes applies it. It adjusts geometry so that it can be better integrated with algebra, and yet deflects a full-scale investigation of curves. It provides a comprehensive conceptual framework for physics, and yet interferes with the exploitation of its dynamical and temporal aspects. Most significantly, it bars a fuller unification of mathematics and physics, despite Descartes' claims to quantify nature. The work of his contemporaries Galileo and Torricelli, and of his (...)
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  35. How symbolic and iconic languages bridge the two worlds of the chemist: a case study from contemporary bioorganic chemistry.Emily R. Grosholz & Roald Hoffmann - 2012 - In Roald Hoffmann (ed.), Roald Hoffmann on the philosophy, art, and science of chemistry. Oxford University Press.
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  36. Leibniz’s Mathematical and Philosophical Analysis of Time.Emily R. Grosholz - 2015 - In Norma B. Goethe, Philip Beeley & David Rabouin (eds.), G.W. Leibniz, Interrelations Between Mathematics and Philosophy. Springer Verlag.
  37.  21
    Problematic Objects between Mathematics and Mechanics.Emily R. Grosholz - 1990 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:385 - 395.
    The existence of mathematical objects may be explained in terms of their occurrence in problems. Especially interesting problems arise at the overlap of domains, and the items that intervene in them are hybrids sharing the characteristics of both domains in an ambiguous way. Euclid's geometry, and Leibniz' work at the intersection of geometry, algebra and mechanics in the late seventeenth century, provide instructive examples of such problems and items. The complex and yet still formal unity of these items calls into (...)
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  38. Rene Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy (1641).Emily R. Grosholz - 2003 - In Jorge J. E. Gracia, Gregory M. Reichberg & Bernard N. Schumacher (eds.), The Classics of Western Philosophy: A Reader's Guide. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 217.
     
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  39.  13
    The Cambridge Companion to Descartes. John Cottingham.Emily R. Grosholz - 1994 - Isis 85 (1):151-152.
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  40.  24
    Theomorphic Expression in Leibniz's "Discourse on Metaphysics".Emily R. Grosholz - 2001 - Studia Leibnitiana 33 (1):4 - 18.
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  41. The House We Never Leave: Childhood, Shelter, and Freedom in the Writings of Beauvoir and Colette.Emily R. Grosholz - 2004 - In The Legacy of Simone de Beauvoir. Clarendon Press.
     
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  42.  83
    The Legacy of Simone de Beauvoir.Emily R. Grosholz (ed.) - 2006 - Clarendon Press.
    This collection of new essays treats the historical, philosophical, and literary dimensions of Simone de Beauvoir's thought, and celebrates the 50th anniversary of her most influential book, The Second Sex. A team of distinguished philosophers and literary critics locate her work in the intellectual and political upheavals that marked Paris in the 1930s and 1940s; analyse her philosophical links to 17th-century rationalism, and to Kant, Hegel, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Simone Weil, and Heidegger; and study the connections between her philosophical and literary (...)
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  43.  15
    Teaching the Complex Numbers: What History and Philosophy of Mathematics Suggest.Emily R. Grosholz - unknown
    The narrative about the nineteenth century favored by many philosophers of mathematics strongly influenced by either logic or algebra, is that geometric intuition led real and complex analysis astray until Cauchy and Kronecker in one sense and Dedekind in another guided mathematicians out of the labyrinth through the arithmetization of analysis. Yet the use of geometry in most cases in nineteenth century mathematics was not misleading and was often key to important developments. Thus the geometrization of complex numbers was essential (...)
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  44.  28
    Eat or Be Eaten: A Feminist Phenomenology of Women as Food.Emily R. Douglas - 2013 - PhaenEx 8 (2):243.
    This paper focuses around women in the food chain, not in terms of agriculture and development, but as food ourselves. I start from the work of Eva-Maria Simms and Val Plumwood, who examine being eaten by non-human animals, and by human infants and fetuses. I use Simms’s and Plumwood’s examples to argue that in viewing our human selves as edible creatures, we not only distance ourselves from the role of "eater" in the masculinist domination framework but reject and break down (...)
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  45.  17
    Foucault, Laughter, and Gendered Normalizatoin.Emily R. Douglas - 2015 - Foucault Studies 20:142-154.
    Thus far, little attention has been paid by Foucauldian scholars to the role of laughter in our subjectivation and normalization, nor to the possible roles of laughter practices in political resistance. Yet, there is a body of references to laughter in both Foucault’s own work and that of his contemporary commentators, subtly indicating that it might be a tool for challenging normalization through transgression. I seek to negotiate the different functions that our laughter practices can have, proposing that laughter is (...)
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  46.  9
    Chemosensory signaling in C. elegans.Emily R. Troemel - 1999 - Bioessays 21 (12):1011-1020.
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  47.  8
    Books in Review.Emily R. Gill - 1986 - Political Theory 14 (1):137-140.
  48.  9
    On the plains and prairies of Minnesota: The role of mathematical statistics in biological explanation.Emily R. Grosholz - 2021 - Synthese 199 (1-2):5377-5393.
    In this essay, I consider the use of mathematical statistics in the study of biological systems in the field, using as case studies the work of Ruth Geyer Shaw and her colleagues at the University of Minnesota. To address practical issues, like how to enhance prairie restoration, and how to prepare for (and perhaps prevent) the effect of rapid climate change, she and her colleagues combine mathematical modeling and intensive data collection in the field. Using ANOVA and the more versatile (...)
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  49.  7
    Problematic Objects between Mathematics and Mechanics.Emily R. Grosholz - 1990 - PSA Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990 (2):385-395.
    The relationship between the objects of mathematics and physics has been a recurrent source of philosophical debate. Rationalist philosophers can minimize the distance between mathematical and physical domains by appealing to transcendental categories, but then are left with the problem of where to locate those categories ontologically. Empiricists can locate their objects in the material realm, but then have difficulty explaining certain peculiar “transcendental” features of mathematics like the timelessness of its objects and the unfalsifiability of (at least some of) (...)
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  50.  9
    If I were in a book.Emily R. Brower - 2017 - Renascence 69 (4):240-253.
    In The Heart of the Matter, Graham Greene’s metafictional commentary (indicated by the relentless presence of language and literature in the content of the novel) runs parallel to his commentary on the Catholic sacrament of the Eucharist. Strikingly, written language, due to its own physical reality and the way in which it is treated in the novel, takes on sacramental characteristics. Both written language and the Eucharist are physical, and both make truth present. Through his use of physical texts to (...)
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