8 found
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  1.  17
    Wench Tactics? Openings in Conditions of Closure.Ruth Fletcher, Diamond Ashiagbor, Nicola Barker, Katie Cruz, Nadine El-Enany, Nikki Godden-Rasul, Emily Grabham, Sarah Keenan, Ambreena Manji, Julie McCandless, Sheelagh McGuinness, Sara Ramshaw, Yvette Russell, Harriet Samuels, Ann Stewart & Dania Thomas - 2017 - Feminist Legal Studies 25 (1):1-23.
    Picking up the question of what FLaK might be, this editorial considers the relationship between openness and closure in feminist legal studies. How do we draw on feminist struggles for openness in common resources, from security to knowledge, as we inhabit a compromised space in commercial publishing? We think about this first in relation to the content of this issue: on image-based abuse continuums, asylum struggles, trials of protestors, customary justice, and not-so-timely reparations. Our thoughts take us through the different (...)
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  2. Bodily Integrity and the Surgical Management of Intersex.Emily Grabham - 2012 - Body and Society 18 (2):1-26.
    Surgeries inevitably raise questions of bodily integrity: how the post-surgical body reframes its experiences of functionality to incorporate new features. Nevertheless, when we try to define or delimit the concept of bodily integrity, it becomes increasingly important to think about how the physical and social unease caused by some forms of surgeries sits alongside the more transformative potential of surgical bodily modification. This article focuses on aesthetic genital surgeries on infants with disorders of sex development. Using the work of Pierre (...)
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  3.  10
    `Flagging' the Skin: Corporeal Nationalism and the Properties of Belonging.Emily Grabham - 2009 - Body and Society 15 (1):63-82.
    Just as the nation is imagined and produced through everyday rhetoric and maps and flags, it is also constructed on the skin, and through bodies, by different types of corporeal `flagging'. In this article, I use two examples of contemporary surgical procedures to explore these dynamics. Aesthetic surgeries on `white' subjects are not often interrogated for their racializing effects, but I use the concept of `flagging' to explore how these surgeries work in the UK to align `white' bodies with a (...)
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  4.  20
    Special Issue – Encountering Human Rights: Gender/Sexuality, Activism and the Promise of Law. [REVIEW]Emily Grabham & Rosemary Hunter - 2008 - Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):1-7.
  5.  26
    “It’s Another Way Of Making A Really Big Fuss” Human Rights And Women’s Activism In The United Kingdom: An Interview With Tania Pouwhare. [REVIEW]Tania Pouwhare & Emily Grabham - 2008 - Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):97-112.
    Following the “Encountering Human Rights” conference in January 2007, Emily Grabham interviewed Tania Pouwhare, a women’s rights activist working at the Women’s Resource Centre in London. Their discussion engaged with the professionalisation of activism, funding constraints and New Labour policies and their impact on immigrant women. Against a background of financial insecurity and huge demand for their services, many women’s organisations in the United Kingdom struggle to use human rights law to advance women’s rights. Nevertheless, the rhetoric of human rights (...)
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  6.  12
    Wendy Brown, Regulating Aversion: Tolerance in the Age of Identity and Empire: Princeton University Press, Princeton, 2008, 288 Pp, Price £13.95 , ISBN: 978-1-4008-2747-3. [REVIEW]Emily Grabham - 2009 - Feminist Legal Studies 17 (1):101-103.
  7.  3
    On Moving the Table: Reflections on an Author-Meets-Reader Session.Emily Grabham - 2018 - Feminist Legal Studies 26 (3):381-384.
    Through a commentary on the enriching experience of receiving feedback through the Brewing Legal Times author-meets-reader session in February 2018, this piece reflects on the intellectual generosity and scholarly labour that makes such sessions an important form of academic social reproduction.
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  8.  5
    Law V Canada: New Directions for Equality Under the Canadian Charter?Emily Grabham - 2002 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 22 (4):641-661.
    The equality provision in section 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms 1982 was drafted with a vision of promoting substantive equality. Following challenges to this vision during the 1990s by a group of conservative Supreme Court judges, the recent judgment of Iacobucci J in Law v Canada (1999) has been welcomed for reasserting section 15's substantive ideal. But despite the effective manner in which the provision was drafted, and despite the recent guidelines set out in Law, interpretations (...)
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