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  1.  17
    Predicting Risk Sensitivity in Humans and Lower Animals: Risk as Variance or Coefficient of Variation.Elke U. Weber, Sharoni Shafir & Ann-Renée Blais - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (2):430-445.
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  2.  27
    All Hearts and Minds on Deck: Hope Motivates Climate Action by Linking the Present and the Future.Elke U. Weber & Sara M. Constantino - 2023 - Emotion Review 15 (4):293-297.
    Emotions shape judgments and decisions, including actions in response to climate change. Despite growing interest in the cognitive, social, and political determinants of climate (in)action, the role of emotions has received limited attention. This review discusses the role of hope in climate action. While many emotional states are oriented to the past or present, hope offers a positive vision of the future. In exploratory analyses of a nationally representative survey of US residents, we identify the most important predictors of hope, (...)
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  3.  16
    How we decide shapes what we choose: decision modes track consumer decisions that help decarbonize electricity generation.Crystal Reeck, Karoline Gamma & Elke U. Weber - 2022 - Theory and Decision 92 (3):731-758.
    With concerns regarding climate change rising, companies and policy makers seek to understand the precursors to environmentally-friendly consumer choice. Decision modes are the qualitatively different psychological processes employed to arrive at decisions. Across six studies, the present project establishes (a) which decision modes are employed by consumers to decide between electricity plans that differ in environmental impact, and (b) how employed decision modes affect those choices. We demonstrate that consumers are most likely to use Calculation Modes when facing such choices. (...)
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  4.  46
    Query theory: Knowing what we want by arguing with ourselves.Elke U. Weber & Eric J. Johnson - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (2):91-92.
  5.  9
    Community-engaged research is best positioned to catalyze systemic change.Holly Caggiano, Sara M. Constantino, Jeffrey Lees, Rohini Majumdar & Elke U. Weber - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e152.
    Addressing many social challenges requires both structural and behavioral change. The binary of an i- and s-frame obscures how behavioral science can help foster bottom-up collective action. Adopting a community-frame perspective moves toward a more integrative view of how social change emerges, and how it might be promoted by policymakers and publics in service of addressing challenges like climate change.
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  6.  30
    Cognitive science of political thought: Some final reflections.Elke U. Weber - 2019 - Cognition 188:140.
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  7. Decision and choice: Risk, empirical studies.Elke U. Weber - 2001 - In N. J. Smelser & B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. pp. 13347--13351.
     
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  8.  23
    Meta-theory rather than method fascism.Elke U. Weber - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):430-431.
    Three comments take issue with specifics of the target article. First, I argue for the development of meta-theory to deal with inconsistencies in experimental results. Second, I advocate the use of the compatibility between experiment and application to decide on the optimal design and procedure of experimental studies. Last, I support the explicit incorporation of motivation into models of decision making.
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  9. Personality and risk taking.Elke U. Weber - 2001 - In N. J. Smelser & B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. pp. 11274.
     
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  10.  38
    Towards a taxonomy of modes of moral decision-making.Elke U. Weber & Jessica S. Ancker - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):563-564.
    Sunstein advocates a more systematic approach to the study of moral decision-making, namely the heuristics-and-biases paradigm. We offer two concerns and suggest that a focus on decision processes can add value. Recent research on decision modes suggest that it is useful to distinguish between the qualitative differences in the ways in which moral decisions can be made when they are not made by reflective, consequentialist reasoning.
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