7 found
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  1.  89
    Statistical learning of tone sequences by human infants and adults.Jenny R. Saffran, Elizabeth K. Johnson, Richard N. Aslin & Elissa L. Newport - 1999 - Cognition 70 (1):27-52.
  2.  22
    Toddlers’ comprehension of adult and child talkers: Adult targets versus vocal tract similarity.Angela Cooper, Natalie Fecher & Elizabeth K. Johnson - 2018 - Cognition 173 (C):16-20.
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  3.  32
    Abstraction and the Language Familiarity Effect.Elizabeth K. Johnson, Laurence Bruggeman & Anne Cutler - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (2):633-645.
    Talkers are recognized more accurately if they are speaking the listeners’ native language rather than an unfamiliar language. This “language familiarity effect” has been shown not to depend upon comprehension and must instead involve language sound patterns. We further examine the level of sound-pattern processing involved, by comparing talker recognition in foreign languages versus two varieties of English, by English speakers of one variety, English speakers of the other variety, and non-native listeners. All listener groups performed better with native than (...)
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  4.  3
    The Icing on the Cake. Or Is it Frosting? The Influence of Group Membership on Children's Lexical Choices.Thomas St Pierre, Jida Jaffan, Craig G. Chambers & Elizabeth K. Johnson - 2024 - Cognitive Science 48 (2):e13410.
    Adults are skilled at using language to construct/negotiate identity and to signal affiliation with others, but little is known about how these abilities develop in children. Clearly, children mirror statistical patterns in their local environment (e.g., Canadian children using zed instead of zee), but do they flexibly adapt their linguistic choices on the fly in response to the choices of different peers? To address this question, we examined the effect of group membership on 7‐ to 9‐year‐olds' labeling of objects in (...)
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  5.  20
    The Other Accent Effect in Talker Recognition: Now You See It, Now You Don't.Madeleine E. Yu, Jessamyn Schertz & Elizabeth K. Johnson - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (6):e12986.
    The existence of the Language Familiarity Effect (LFE), where talkers of a familiar language are easier to identify than talkers of an unfamiliar language, is well‐documented and uncontroversial. However, a closely related phenomenon known as the Other Accent Effect (OAE), where accented talkers are more difficult to recognize, is less well understood. There are several possible explanations for why the OAE exists, but to date, little data exist to adjudicate differences between them. Here, we begin to address this issue by (...)
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  6.  28
    Some implications from language development for merge.Peter W. Jusczyk & Elizabeth K. Johnson - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):334-335.
    Recent investigations indicate that, around 7-months-of-age, infants begin to show some ability to recognize words in fluent speech. In segmenting and recognizing words, infants rely on information available in the speech signal. We consider what implications these findings have for adult word recognition models in general, and for Merge, in particular.
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  7.  17
    Looking for Wugs in all the Right Places: Children's Use of Prepositions in Word Learning.Thomas St Pierre & Elizabeth K. Johnson - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (8):e13028.
    To help infer the meanings of novel words, children frequently capitalize on their current linguistic knowledge to constrain the hypothesis space. Children's syntactic knowledge of function words has been shown to be especially useful in helping to infer the meanings of novel words, with most previous research focusing on how children use preceding determiners and pronouns/auxiliary to infer whether a novel word refers to an entity or an action, respectively. In the current visual world experiment, we examined whether 28‐ to (...)
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