Results for 'Elizabeth Clare Temple'

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  1.  44
    A comparison of internet-based participant recruitment methods: engaging the hidden population of cannabis users in research.Elizabeth Clare Temple & Rhonda Frances Brown - 2011 - Journal of Research Practice 7 (2):Article - D2.
    While a growing number of researchers are embracing Internet-based data collection methods, the adoption of Internet-based recruitment methods has been relatively slow. This may be because little is known regarding the relative strengths and weaknesses of different methods of Internet-based participant recruitment, nor how these different recruitment strategies impact on the data collected. These issues are addressed in this article with reference to a study comparing the effectiveness of three Internet-based strategies in recruiting cannabis users for an online study. Consideration (...)
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  2.  5
    The economic philosophy of Jesus Christ vs. the religious philosophy of Karl Marx.Elizabeth Clare Prophet - 2019 - Gardiner, Montana: Summit University Press.
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  3.  31
    Can safety assurance procedures in the food industry be used to evaluate a medical screening programme? The application of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point system to an antenatal serum screening programme for Down's syndrome. Stage 1: identifying significant hazards.M. Clare Derrington, Janet D. Glencross, Elizabeth S. Draper, Ronald T. Hsu & Jennifer J. Kurinczuk - 2003 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 9 (1):39-47.
  4.  73
    Does midwifery-led care demonstrate care ethics: A template analysis.Kate Buchanan, Elizabeth Newnham, Deborah Ireson, Clare Davison & Sara Bayes - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):245-257.
    Background: Ethical care in maternity is fundamental to providing care that both prevents harm and does good, and yet, there is growing acknowledgement that disrespect and abuse routinely occur in this context, which indicates that current ethical frameworks are not adequate. Care ethics offers an alternative to the traditional biomedical ethical principles. Research aim: The aim of the study was to determine whether a correlation exists between midwifery-led care and care ethics as an important first step in an action research (...)
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  5.  20
    Can safety assurance procedures in the food industry be used to evaluate a medical screening programme? The application of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point system to an antenatal serum screening programme for Down's syndrome. Stage 2: overcoming the hazards in programme delivery.M. Clare Derrington, Elizabeth S. Draper, Ronald T. Hsu & Jennifer J. Kurinczuk - 2003 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 9 (1):49-57.
  6.  30
    " Are there any right or wrong answers in teaching philosophy": ethics, epistemology, and philosophy in the classroom.Gordon Tait, Clare D. O'Farrell, Sarah Davey Chesters, Joanne M. Brownlee, Rebecca S. Spooner-Lane & Elizabeth M. Curtis - 2012 - Teaching Philosophy 35 (4).
  7.  17
    Are There Any Right or Wrong Answers in Teaching Philosophy?Gordon Tait, Clare O'Farrell, Sarah Davey Chesters, Joanne Brownlee, Rebecca Spooner-Lane & Elizabeth Curtis - 2012 - Teaching Philosophy 35 (4):367-381.
    This article assesses undergraduate teaching students’ assertion that there are no right and wrong answers in teaching philosophy. When asked questions about their experiences of philosophy in the classroom for primary children, their unanimous declaration that teaching philosophy has ‘no right and wrong answers’ is critically examined across the three sub-disciplinary areas to which they were generally referring, namely, pedagogy, ethics, and epistemology. From a pedagogical point of view, it is argued that some teach­ing approaches may indeed be more effective (...)
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  8.  70
    Are There Any Right or Wrong Answers in Teaching Philosophy?Gordon Tait, Clare O'Farrell, Sarah Davey Chesters, Joanne Brownlee, Rebecca Spooner-Lane & Elizabeth Curtis - 2012 - Teaching Philosophy 35 (4):367-381.
    This article assesses undergraduate teaching students’ assertion that there are no right and wrong answers in teaching philosophy. When asked questions about their experiences of philosophy in the classroom for primary children, their unanimous declaration that teaching philosophy has ‘no right and wrong answers’ is critically examined across the three sub-disciplinary areas to which they were generally referring, namely, pedagogy, ethics, and epistemology. From a pedagogical point of view, it is argued that some teach­ing approaches may indeed be more effective (...)
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  9. On an Alleged Case of Propaganda: Reply to McKinnon.Sophie R. Allen, Elizabeth Finneron-Burns, Mary Leng, Holly Lawford-Smith, Jane Clare Jones, Rebecca Reilly-Cooper & R. J. Simpson - manuscript
    In her recent paper ‘The Epistemology of Propaganda’ Rachel McKinnon discusses what she refers to as ‘TERF propaganda’. We take issue with three points in her paper. The first is her rejection of the claim that ‘TERF’ is a misogynistic slur. The second is the examples she presents as commitments of so-called ‘TERFs’, in order to establish that radical (and gender critical) feminists rely on a flawed ideology. The third is her claim that standpoint epistemology can be used to establish (...)
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  10.  30
    Care ethics framework for midwifery practice: A scoping review.Kate Buchanan, Elizabeth Newnham, Deborah Ireson, Clare Davison & Sadie Geraghty - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (5):1107-1133.
    Background: As a normative theory, care ethics has become widely theorized and accepted. However, there remains a lack of clarity in relation to its use in practice, and a care ethics framework for practice. Maternity care is fraught with ethical issues and care ethics may provide an avenue to enhance ethical sensitivity. Aim: The purpose of this scoping review is to determine how care ethics is used amongst health professions, and to collate the information in data charts to create a (...)
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  11.  8
    Positive Economic, Psychosocial, and Physiological Ecologies Predict Brain Structure and Cognitive Performance in 9–10-Year-Old Children. [REVIEW]Marybel Robledo Gonzalez, Clare E. Palmer, Kristina A. Uban, Terry L. Jernigan, Wesley K. Thompson & Elizabeth R. Sowell - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
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  12.  23
    Metaphysical Animals: How Four Women Brought Philosophy Back to Life.Clare Mac Cumhaill & Rachael Wiseman - 2022 - London, UK: Chatto and Windus.
    'Philosophy in a world of women. I reflected, talking with Mary, Pip and Elizabeth, how much I love them.' Two brilliant young scholars uncover the major philosophical contributions of four women whose ideas could have changed the course of twentieth-century thought. Written with energy, expertise and panache, The Quartet is a page-turning blend of research and recovery, storytelling, and a call to arms. Iris Murdoch, Philippa Foot, Mary Midgley and Elizabeth Anscombe were great friends and comrades in the (...)
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  13.  26
    Interrupting the conversation: Donald MacKinnon, wartime tutor of Anscombe, Midgley, Murdoch and Foot.Clare Mac Cumhaill & Rachael Wiseman - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 56 (6):838–850.
    Elizabeth Anscombe, Mary Midgley, Iris Murdoch and Philippa Foot all studied at Oxford University during the Second World War. One of their wartime tutors was Donald MacKinnon. This paper gives a broad overview of MacKinnon's philosophical outlook as it was developing at this time. Four talks from between 1938 and 1941—‘And the Son of Man That Thou Visiteth Him’ (1938), ‘What Is a Metaphysical Statement?’ (1940), ‘The Function of Philosophy in Education’ (1941) and ‘Revelation and Social Justice’ (1941)—give a (...)
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  14. The Importance of Murdoch's Early Encounters with Anscombe and Marcel.Clare Mac Cumhaill & Rachael Wiseman - 2022 - In Silvia Caprioglio Panizza & Mark Hopwood (eds.), Murdochian Mind. New York, NY: Routledge.
    In his reference letter for Murdoch’s 1947 fellowship application at Newnham College, Cambridge, her erstwhile Oxford undergraduate tutor, Donald MacKinnon, remarks that Murdoch is ‘on the threshold of creative work of a high order’. This chapter outlines the nature of that ‘creative work’ and its early development. We show how Murdoch’s close study of the Christian existentialist philosopher and playwright Gabriel Marcel (1883–1973) came to inflect both her early critique of Jean Paul Sartre’s existentialism and her first attempts to show (...)
     
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  15.  5
    Traces of feminist art: Temporal complexity in the work of Eleanor Antin, Vanessa Beecroft and Elizabeth Manchester.Clare Johnson - 2006 - Feminist Theory 7 (3):309-331.
    This article discusses the relationship between Eleanor Antin’s Carving: A Traditional Sculpture (1973) and Elizabeth Manchester’s All My Dresses With All My Shoes (2002) in terms of the differently structured temporalities of making and viewing through which the concept of femininity materializes in each work. Diachronic understandings of post-feminism, as a concept emptied of a former moment of political consciousness, are contested through my readings of artworks that call forth a complexity of tenses. The article argues that the connections (...)
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  16.  10
    Women Philosophers in Nineteenth-Century Britain, by Alison Stone.Clare Carlisle - forthcoming - Mind:fzad054.
    Elizabeth Anscombe, Iris Murdoch, Mary Midgley, Simone Weil, Hannah Arendt and Simone de Beauvoir have long been relied upon to bring some token of gender balan.
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  17.  8
    Metaphysical animals: how four women brought philosophy back to life.Clare Mac Cumhaill - 2022 - New York: Doubleday. Edited by Rachael Wiseman.
    A vibrant portrait of four college friends-Iris Murdoch, Philippa Foot, Elizabeth Anscombe, and Mary Midgley-who formed a new philosophical tradition while Oxford's men were away at war.
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  18.  3
    Cosmic cradle: spiritual dimensions of life before birth.Elizabeth Carman - 2013 - Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books. Edited by Neil J. Carman.
    Where was your soul before you were born? If your soul is immortal, did it have a "life" prior to birth? Did you choose your life and parents? Is reincarnation real? Elizabeth and Neil Carman, the authors of Cosmic Cradle, address these questions through interviews with adults and children who report pre-birth experiences (PBEs) not based on regression, hypnosis, or drugs. Instead, interviewees recall their pre-birth existence completely sober and awake. In contrast to near-death experiences (NDEs), which have been (...)
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  19.  40
    Clare and the Place of the Peasant Poet.Elizabeth Helsinger - 1987 - Critical Inquiry 13 (3):509-531.
    One might say that Clare is almost by virtue of that label alone a political poet. “Peasant poet” is a contradiction in terms from the perspective of English literary history, or of the longer history of the literary pastoral. The phrase must refer to two different social locations, and as such makes social place an explicit, problematic concern for the middle-class readers of that poet’s work. To Clare’s publisher and patrons in the 1820s, as to his editors in (...)
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  20.  5
    Temples et Sanctuaries.Elizabeth Stone & G. Roux - 1987 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 107 (2):338.
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  21. The Ruins of War.Elizabeth Scarbrough - 2019 - In Jeanette Bicknell, Carolyn Korsmeyer & Jennifer Judkins (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Ruins, Monuments, and Memorials. New York: Routledge. pp. 228-240.
    Ruins are evocative structures, and we value them in different ways for the various things they mean to us. Ruins can be aesthetically appreciated, but they are also valued for their historical importance, what they symbolize to different cultures and communities, and as lucrative objects, i.e., for tourism. However, today an increasing number of ancient ruins have been damaged or completely destroyed by acts of war. In 2001 the Taliban struck a major blow to cultural heritage by blasting the Bamiyan (...)
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  22. Answering Dreyfus's Challenge: Toward a Theory of Concepts without Intellectualism.Kevin Temple - 2017 - Dissertation, The New School
    John McDowell’s debates about concepts with Robert Brandom and Hubert Dreyfus over the past two decades reveal key commitments each philosopher makes. McDowell is committed to giving concepts a role in our embodied coping, extending rational form to human experience. Brandom is committed to defining concepts in a way that helps make rationality distinct. And Dreyfus is committed to explaining how rational understanding develops out of lesser abilities we share with human infants and other animals (I call this “Dreyfus’s challenge”). (...)
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  23.  66
    Against Marriage: An Egalitarian Defence of the Marriage-Free State, by Clare Chambers. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Brake - 2019 - Mind 128 (509):283-292.
    Against Marriage: An Egalitarian Defence of the Marriage-Free State, by ChambersClare. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. xi + 226.
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  24.  12
    The Buddha through Christian Eyes.Elizabeth J. Harris - 1999 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 19 (1):101-105.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Buddha through Christian EyesElizabeth J. HarrisIt was in Sri Lanka in 1984 that I had my first ‘encounter’ with the Buddha. When at the ancient city of Anuradhapura, I stole away from the group I was with to return for a few minutes to the shrine room adjacent to the sacred bo tree, the one believed to have grown from a cutting of the original tree under which (...)
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  25.  11
    What's divine about divine law?: early perspectives.Christine Elizabeth Hayes - 2015 - Princeton: Princeton University Press.
    Biblical discourses of divine law -- Greco-Roman discourses of law -- Bridging the gap: divine law in Hellenistic and Second temple Jewish sources -- Minding the gap: Paul -- The "truth" about Torah -- The (ir)rationality of Torah -- The flexibility of Torah -- Natural law in Rabbinic sources?
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  26.  8
    The Mortuary Temple of Ramses III. Part II.Bernard V. Bothmer, Uvo Hölscher, Elizabeth B. Hauser & Uvo Holscher - 1952 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 72 (4):179.
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  27. Appearance in this list does not preclude a future review of the book. Where they are known prices are either given in $ US or in£ UK. Adams, EA, Religion and Cultural Freedom, Philadelphia, USA, Temple University Press, 1993, pp. 193. Alcinous, The Handbook of Platonism, Dillon John (trans.), Oxford, UK, Oxford Univer. [REVIEW]Paul Anand, J. Bacon, K. Campbell, L. Reinhardt, Aaron Ben-Ze'ev, Alexander Broadie, Ruth Ellen Bulger, Elizabeth Heitman & Stanley Joel Reiser - 1994 - Mind 103.
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  28.  5
    Elizabeth de Burgh, Lady Clare : Household and Other Records.Colin Richmond - 2016 - Common Knowledge 22 (2):320-321.
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  29.  79
    Animal Ethics in Context.Clare Palmer - 2010 - Columbia University Press.
    It is widely agreed that because animals feel pain we should not make them suffer gratuitously. Some ethical theories go even further: because of the capacities that they possess, animals have the right not to be harmed or killed. These views concern what not to do to animals, but we also face questions about when we should, and should not, assist animals that are hungry or distressed. Should we feed a starving stray kitten? And if so, does this commit us, (...)
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  30. For their own good: captive cats and routine confinement.Clare Palmer & Peter Sandoe - 2014 - In Lori Gruen (ed.), Ethics of Captivity. Oxford University Press. pp. 135-155.
  31. The Minority Body: A Theory of Disability.Elizabeth Barnes - 2016 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    Disability is primarily a social phenomenon -- a way of being a minority, a way of facing social oppression, but not a way of being inherently or intrinsically worse off. This is how disability is understood in the Disability Rights and Disability Pride movements; but there is a massive disconnect with the way disability is typically viewed within analytic philosophy. The idea that disability is not inherently bad or sub-optimal is one that many philosophers treat with open skepticism, and sometimes (...)
  32. What’s That Smell?Clare Batty - 2009 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (4):321-348.
    In philosophical discussions of the secondary qualities, color has taken center stage. Smells, tastes, sounds, and feels have been treated, by and large, as mere accessories to colors. We are, as it is said, visual creatures. This, at least, has been the working assumption in the philosophy of perception and in those metaphysical discussions about the nature of the secondary qualities. The result has been a scarcity of work on the “other” secondary qualities. In this paper, I take smells and (...)
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  33.  37
    Chaos, Territory, Art: Deleuze and the Framing of the Earth.Elizabeth Grosz - 2008 - Columbia University Press.
    Instead of treating art as a unique creation that requires reason and refined taste to appreciate, Elizabeth Grosz argues that art-especially architecture, music, and painting-is born from the disruptive forces of sexual selection. She approaches art as a form of erotic expression connecting sensory richness with primal desire, and in doing so, finds that the meaning of art comes from the intensities and sensations it inspires, not just its intention and aesthetic. By regarding our most cultured human accomplishments as (...)
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  34. The Illusion Confusion.Clare Batty - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5:1-11.
    In "What the Nose Doesn't Know", I argue that there are no olfactory illusions. Central to the traditional notions of illusion and hallucination is a notion of object-failure—the failure of an experience to represent particular objects. Because there are no presented objects in the case of olfactory experience, I argue that the traditional ways of categorizing non-veridical experience do not apply to the olfactory case. In their place, I propose a novel notion of non-veridical experience for the olfactory case. In (...)
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  35.  7
    Teacher subject identity in professional practice: teaching with a professional compass.Clare Brooks - 2016 - New York, NY: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
    Teacher Subject Identity in Professional Practicefocuses on a key, but neglected, element of a teacher's identity: that of their subject expertise.Studies of teachers' professional practice have shown the importance of a teacher's identity and the extent to which it can affect their resilience, commitment and ultimately their effectiveness. Drawing upon narrative research undertaken with a range of teachers over a period of 14 years, the book explores how subject expertise can play a significant role in teacher identity, acting as a (...)
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  36. Equality and Autonomy for All? Liberalism, Feminism and Social Construction.Clare Chambers - 2003 - Dissertation, Oxford University
     
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  37. Who's Read “Macho Sluts?”'.Clare Whatling - 1999 - In Morag Shiach (ed.), Feminism and cultural studies. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 417--30.
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  38. Seneca on fortune and the kingdom of God.Elizabeth Asmis - 2009 - In Shadi Bartsch & David Wray (eds.), Seneca and the self. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  39. A representational account of olfactory experience.Clare Batty - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):511-538.
    Much of the philosophical work on perception has focused on vision, with very little discussion of the chemical senses—olfaction and gustation. In this paper, I consider the challenge that olfactory experience presents to upholding a representational view of the sense modalities. Given the phenomenology of olfactory experience, it is difficult to see what a representational view of it would be like. Olfaction, then, presents an important challenge for representational theories to overcome. In this paper, I take on this challenge and (...)
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  40. Smelling lessons.Clare Batty - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 153 (1):161-174.
    Much of the philosophical work on perception has focused on vision. Recently, however, philosophers have begun to correct this ‘tunnel vision’ by considering other modalities. Nevertheless, relatively little has been written about the chemical senses—olfaction and gustation. The focus of this paper is olfaction. In this paper, I consider the question: does human olfactory experience represents objects as thus and so? If we take visual experience as the paradigm of how experience can achieve object representation, we might think that the (...)
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  41. Realism and social structure.Elizabeth Barnes - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (10):2417-2433.
    Social constructionism is often considered a form of anti-realism. But in contemporary feminist philosophy, an increasing number of philosophers defend views that are well-described as both realist and social constructionist. In this paper, I use the work of Sally Haslanger as an example of realist social constructionism. I argue: that Haslanger is best interpreted as defending metaphysical realism about social structures; that this type of metaphysical realism about the social world presents challenges to some popular ways of understanding metaphysical realism.
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  42. On the Independence of Belief and Credence.Elizabeth Jackson - 2022 - Philosophical Issues 32 (1):9-31.
    Much of the literature on the relationship between belief and credence has focused on the reduction question: that is, whether either belief or credence reduces to the other. This debate, while important, only scratches the surface of the belief-credence connection. Even on the anti-reductive dualist view, belief and credence could still be very tightly connected. Here, I explore questions about the belief-credence connection that go beyond reduction. This paper is dedicated to what I call the independence question: just how independent (...)
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  43. Olfactory Experience II: Objects and Properties.Clare Batty - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (12):1147-1156.
    The philosophy of perception has been dominated by vision, with very little discussion of the chemical senses – olfaction and gustation. In this second entry of a pair on olfactory experience, I consider what olfaction has to tell us about two issues: the nature of perceptual objects and the nature of perceptual properties and, in particular, the secondary qualities. Given the scant work on olfaction in the philosophical literature, my discussion not only surveys what philosophers have said about olfaction so (...)
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  44.  53
    A Representational Account of Olfactory Experience.Clare Batty - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):511-538.
    Seattle rain smelled different from New Orleans rain…. New Orleans rain smelled of sulfur and hibiscus, trumpet metal, thunder, and sweat. Seattle rain, the widespread rain of the Great Northwest, smelled of green ice and sumi ink, of geology and silence and minnow breath.— Tom Robbins, Jitterbug PerfumeMuch of the philosophical literature on perception has focused on vision. This is not surprising, given that vision holds for us a certain prestige. Our visual experience is incredibly rich, offering up a mosaic (...)
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  45. A Theory of Metaphysical Indeterminacy.Elizabeth Barnes & J. Robert G. Williams - 2011 - In Karen Bennett & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics Volume 6. Oxford University Press UK. pp. 103-148.
    If the world itself is metaphysically indeterminate in a specified respect, what follows? In this paper, we develop a theory of metaphysical indeterminacy answering this question.
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  46. Olfactory Experience I: The Content of Olfactory Experience.Clare Batty - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (12):1137-1146.
    Much of the philosophical work on perception has focused on vision. Recently, however, philosophers have been turning their attention to the ‘other modalities’. In a pair of entries, I consider olfaction—a sense modality that, along with gustation, has been largely overlooked by philosophers. In this first entry, I consider the challenge that olfactory experience presents to upholding a representational view of the sense modalities. It is common for philosophers to think that visual experience is world‐directed and, in particular, that it (...)
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  47. Disability studies, conceptual engineering, and conceptual activism.Elizabeth Amber Cantalamessa - 2021 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 64 (1-2):46-75.
    In this project I am concerned with the extent to which conceptual engineering happens in domains outside of philosophy, and if so, what that might look like. Specifically, I’ll argue that...
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  48. Value in ethics and economics.Elizabeth Anderson - 1993 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
    Women as commercial baby factories, nature as an economic resource, life as one big shopping mall: This is what we get when we use the market as a common ...
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  49.  86
    Regularity in semantic change.Elizabeth Closs Traugott - 2002 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Richard B. Dasher.
    This new and important study of semantic change examines how new meanings arise through language use, especially the various ways in which speakers and writers experiment with uses of words and constructions in the flow of strategic interaction with addressees. In the last few decades there has been growing interest in exploring systemicities in semantic change from a number of perspectives including theories of metaphor, pragmatic inferencing, and grammaticalization. Like earlier studies, these have for the most part been based on (...)
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  50.  43
    How Prevalent is Contract Cheating and to What Extent are Students Repeat Offenders?Joseph Clare & Guy J. Curtis - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (2):115-124.
    Contract cheating, or plagiarism via paid ghostwriting, is a significant academic ethical issue, especially as reliable methods for its prevention and detection in students’ assignments remain elusive. Contract cheating in academic assessment has been the subject of much recent debate and concern. Although some scandals have attracted substantial media attention, little is known about the likely prevalence of contract cheating by students for their university assignments. Although rates of contract cheating tend to be low, criminological theories suggest that people who (...)
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