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Elizabeth Cashdan [19]Elizabeth A. Cashdan [2]
  1. Pathogen Prevalence, Group Bias, and Collectivism in the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample.Elizabeth Cashdan & Matthew Steele - 2013 - Human Nature 24 (1):59-75.
    It has been argued that people in areas with high pathogen loads will be more likely to avoid outsiders, to be biased in favor of in-groups, and to hold collectivist and conformist values. Cross-national studies have supported these predictions. In this paper we provide new pathogen codes for the 186 cultures of the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample and use them, together with existing pathogen and ethnographic data, to try to replicate these cross-national findings. In support of the theory, we found that (...)
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  2.  29
    Sex Differences in Mobility and Spatial Cognition.Layne Vashro, Lace Padilla & Elizabeth Cashdan - 2016 - Human Nature 27 (1):16-34.
  3.  9
    Sex Differences in Exploration Behavior and the Relationship to Harm Avoidance.Kyle T. Gagnon, Elizabeth A. Cashdan, Jeanine K. Stefanucci & Sarah H. Creem-Regehr - 2016 - Human Nature 27 (1):82-97.
  4.  5
    Cultural Change Reduces Gender Differences in Mobility and Spatial Ability among Seminomadic Pastoralist-Forager Children in Northern Namibia.Helen E. Davis, Jonathan Stack & Elizabeth Cashdan - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):178-206.
    A fundamental cognitive function found across a wide range of species and necessary for survival is the ability to navigate complex environments. It has been suggested that mobility may play an important role in the development of spatial skills. Despite evolutionary arguments offering logical explanations for why sex/gender differences in spatial abilities and mobility might exist, thus far there has been limited sampling from nonindustrialized and subsistence-based societies. This lack of sampling diversity has left many unanswered questions regarding the effects (...)
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  5.  24
    Mobility and Navigation Among the Yucatec Maya.Elizabeth Cashdan, Karen L. Kramer, Helen E. Davis, Lace Padilla & Russell D. Greaves - 2016 - Human Nature 27 (1):35-50.
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  6.  4
    Harm Avoidance and Mobility During Middle Childhood and Adolescence among Hadza Foragers.Alyssa N. Crittenden, Alan Farahani, Kristen N. Herlosky, Trevor R. Pollom, Ibrahim A. Mabulla, Ian T. Ruginski & Elizabeth Cashdan - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):150-176.
    Cross-cultural sex differences in mobility and harm avoidance have been widely reported, often emphasizing fitness benefits of long-distance travel for males and high costs for females. Data emerging from adults in small-scale societies, however, are challenging the assumption that female mobility is restricted during reproduction. Such findings warrant further exploration of the ontogeny of mobility. Here, using a combination of machine-learning, mixed-effects linear regression, and GIS mapping, we analyze range size, daily distance traveled, and harm avoidance among Hadza foragers during (...)
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  7.  18
    Why Go There? Evolution of Mobility and Spatial Cognition in Women and Men.Elizabeth Cashdan & Steven J. C. Gaulin - 2016 - Human Nature 27 (1):1-15.
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  8.  8
    Not All Those Who Wander Are Lost: Spatial Exploration Patterns and Their Relationship to Gender and Spatial Memory.Kyle T. Gagnon, Brandon J. Thomas, Ascher Munion, Sarah H. Creem-Regehr, Elizabeth A. Cashdan & Jeanine K. Stefanucci - 2018 - Cognition 180:108-117.
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  9.  23
    A Sensitive Period for Learning About Food.Elizabeth Cashdan - 1994 - Human Nature 5 (3):279-291.
    It is proposed here that there is a sensitive period in the first two to three years of life during which humans acquire a basic knowledge of what foods are safe to eat. In support of this, it is shown that willingness to eat a wide variety of foods is greatest between the ages of one and two years, and then declines to low levels by age four. These data also show that children who are introduced to solids unusually late (...)
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  10.  8
    Adaptiveness of Food Learning and Food Aversions in Children.Elizabeth Cashdan - 1998 - Social Science Information 37 (4):613-632.
    This paper uses an evolutionary perspective to explain features of food learning in human children. Data from Western parents indicate that children are least picky about foods when they are between one and two years of age, vegetables are frequently refused by children, and children have a tendency to eat foods one at a time rather than mixed together. Adaptive explanations for these patterns are suggested, together with supporting evidence from studies of the ontogeny of human and non-human primate diet (...)
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  11. Evolutionary Perspectives on Human Aggression.Elizabeth Cashdan & Stephen M. Downes - 2012 - Human Nature 23 (1):1-4.
    The papers in this volume present varying approaches to human aggression, each from an evolutionary perspective. The evolutionary studies of aggression collected here all pursue aspects of patterns of response to environmental circumstances and consider explicitly how those circumstances shape the costs and benefits of behaving aggressively. All the authors understand various aspects of aggression as evolved adaptations but none believe that this implies we are doomed to continued violence, but rather that variation in aggression has evolutionary roots. These papers (...)
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  12.  2
    Childhood Experience Reduces Gender Differences in Spatial Abilities: A Cross‐Cultural Study.Mariah G. Schug, Erica Barhorst-Cates, Jeanine Stefanucci, Sarah Creem-Regehr, Anna P. L. Olsen & Elizabeth Cashdan - 2022 - Cognitive Science 46 (2).
    Cognitive Science, Volume 46, Issue 2, February 2022.
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  13.  20
    In-Group Loyalty or Out-Group Avoidance? Isolating the Links Between Pathogens and in-Group Assortative Sociality.Elizabeth Cashdan - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):82-82.
    The target article gives two explanations for the correlation between pathogens, family ties, and religiosity: one highlights the benefits of xenophobic attitudes for reducing pathogen exposure, the other highlights the benefits of ethnic loyalty for mitigating the costs when a person falls ill. Preliminary data from traditional societies provide some support for the former explanation but not the latter.
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  14. Navigational Experience and the Preservation of Spatial Abilities Into Old Age Among a Tropical Forager‐Farmer Population.Helen E. Davis, Michael Gurven & Elizabeth Cashdan - forthcoming - Wiley: Topics in Cognitive Science.
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  15.  4
    Correction to: Cultural Change Reduces Gender Differences in Mobility and Spatial Ability among Seminomadic Pastoralist-Forager Children in Northern Namibia.Helen E. Davis, Jonathan Stack & Elizabeth Cashdan - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):207-207.
    A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12110-021-09400-0.
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  16.  1
    Navigational Experience and the Preservation of Spatial Abilities Into Old Age Among a Tropical Forager‐Farmer Population.Helen E. Davis, Michael Gurven & Elizabeth Cashdan - forthcoming - Topics in Cognitive Science.
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  17.  27
    Why is Testosterone Associated with Divorce in Men?Elizabeth Cashdan - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):366-366.
    There is evidence that in women high levels of testosterone are associated with more sexual partners and more permissive sexual attitudes. If a similar relationship holds true for men, the higher basal testosterone levels of divorced and unmarried men may be caused by this relationship rather than by testosterone's effect on dominance striving.
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  18.  14
    Sex Differences in Aggression: What Does Evolutionary Theory Predict?Elizabeth Cashdan - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):273-274.
    The target article claims that evolutionary theory predicts the emergence of sex differences in aggression in early childhood, and that there will be no sex difference in anger. It also finds an absence of sex differences in spousal abuse in Western societies. All three are puzzling from an evolutionary perspective and warrant further discussion.
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  19.  1
    Childhood Experience Reduces Gender Differences in Spatial Abilities: A Cross‐Cultural Study.Mariah G. Schug, Erica Barhorst-Cates, Jeanine Stefanucci, Sarah Creem-Regehr, Anna P. L. Olsen & Elizabeth Cashdan - 2022 - Cognitive Science 46 (2):e13096.
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  20.  3
    Correction to: Harm Avoidance and Mobility During Middle Childhood and Adolescence among Hadza Foragers.Alyssa N. Crittenden, Alan Farahani, Kristen N. Herlosky, Trevor R. Pollom, Ibrahim A. Mabulla, Ian T. Ruginski & Elizabeth Cashdan - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (1):177-177.
    A correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12110-021-09403-x.
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  21.  13
    How Women Compete.Elizabeth Cashdan - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):221-221.
    Men are more physically aggressive and more risk-prone than women, but are not necessarily more competitive. New data show the gender difference in competitiveness to be one of kind rather than degree, with women and men competing in different ways and, to some extent, over different objectives, but not differing in overall strength of competitive feeling.
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