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Elizabeth Belfiore [30]Elizabeth S. Belfiore [4]
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Elizabeth Belfiore
University of Minnesota
  1.  78
    Socrates' Daimonic Art: Love for Wisdom in Four Platonic Dialogues.Elizabeth S. Belfiore - 2012 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Despite increasing interest in the figure of Socrates and in love in ancient Greece, no recent monograph studies these topics in all four of Plato's dialogues on love and friendship. This book provides important new insights into these subjects by examining Plato's characterization of Socrates in Symposium, Phaedrus, Lysis and the often neglected Alcibiades I. It focuses on the specific ways in which the philosopher searches for wisdom together with his young interlocutors, using an art that is 'erotic', not in (...)
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  2.  13
    Tragic Pleasures: Aristotle on Plot and Emotion.Elizabeth S. Belfiore - 1992
    Of other ancient writers, call into question the traditional view that katharsis in the Poetics is a homeopathic process - one in which pity and fear affect emotions like themselves. She maintains, instead, that Aristotle considered katharsis to be an allopathic process in which pity and fear purge the soul of shameless, antisocial, and aggressive emotions. While exploring katharsis, Tragic Pleasures analyzes the closely related question of how the Poetics treats the.
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  3.  68
    Plato's Greatest Accusation against Poetry.Elizabeth Belfiore - 1983 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 13 (sup1):39-62.
  4. A theory of imitation in Plato's `Republic'.Elizabeth Belfiore - 2006 - In Andrew Laird (ed.), Ancient Literary Criticism. Oxford University Press.
  5.  85
    Wine and Catharsis_ of the Emotions in Plato's _Laws.Elizabeth Belfiore - 1986 - Classical Quarterly 36 (02):421-.
    Plato's views on tragedy depend in large part on his views about the ethical consequences of emotional arousal. In the Republic, Plato treats the desires we feel in everyday life to weep and feel pity as appetites exactly like those for food or sex, whose satisfactions are ‘replenishments’. Physical desire is not reprehensible in itself, but is simply non-rational, not identical with reason but capable of being brought into agreement with it. Some desires, like that for simple and wholesome food, (...)
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  6.  70
    Pleasure, Tragedy and Aristotelian Psychology.Elizabeth Belfiore - 1985 - Classical Quarterly 35 (02):349-.
    Aristotle's Rhetoric defines fear as a kind of pain or disturbance and pity as a kind of pain . In his Poetics, however, pity and fear are associated with pleasure: ‘ The poet must provide the pleasure that comes from pity and fear by means of imitation’ . The question of the relationship between pleasure and pain in Aristotle's aesthetics has been studied primarily in connection with catharsis. Catharsis, however, raises more problems than it solves. Aristotle says nothing at all (...)
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  7. Family Friendship in Aristotle’s Ethics.Elizabeth Belfiore - 2001 - Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):113-132.
  8. Plato's Greatest Accusation against Poetry.Elizabeth Belfiore - 1983 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 9:39.
     
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  9.  29
    Wine and Catharsis_ of the Emotions in Plato's _Laws.Elizabeth Belfiore - 1986 - Classical Quarterly 36 (2):421-437.
    Plato's views on tragedy depend in large part on his views about the ethical consequences of emotional arousal. In theRepublic, Plato treats the desires we feel in everyday life to weep and feel pity as appetites exactly like those for food or sex, whose satisfactions are ‘replenishments’. Physical desire is not reprehensible in itself, but is simplynon-rational, not identical with reason but capable of being brought into agreement with it. Some desires, like that for simple and wholesome food, are in (...)
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  10.  65
    Dancing with the Gods: The Myth of the Chariot in Plato's Phaedrus.Elizabeth S. Belfiore - 2006 - American Journal of Philology 127 (2):185-217.
  11.  34
    Pleasure, Tragedy and Aristotelian Psychology.Elizabeth Belfiore - 1985 - Classical Quarterly 35 (2):349-361.
    Aristotle'sRhetoricdefines fear as a kind of pain (lypē) or disturbance (tarachē) and pity as a kind of pain (2.5.1382 a 21 and 2.8.1385 b 13). In hisPoetics, however, pity and fear are associated with pleasure: ‘ The poet must provide the pleasure that comes from pity and fear by means of imitation’ (τ⋯ν ⋯π⋯ ⋯λέου κα⋯ ɸόβου δι⋯ μιμήσεως δεῖ ⋯δον⋯ν παρασκευάζειν14.1453 b 12–13). The question of the relationship between pleasure and pain in Aristotle's aesthetics has been studied primarily in (...)
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  12.  27
    Tragédie, thumos, et plaisir esthétique.Elizabeth Belfiore - 2003 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 67 (4):451.
    Résumé — Dans cet article, je montre que l’une des fonctions de la tragédie est de procurer un entraînement au thumos , en l’habituant à devenir amical plutôt qu’agressif envers les philoi . Je donne d’abord un bref aperçu des thèses sur le thumos exposées dans les œuvres éthiques et politiques d’Aristote. Ensuite, j’étudie la relation entre le thumos et les actes de violence entre proches, qui constituent le sujet de la tragédie, en montrant comment la pitié et la crainte (...)
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  13. Aristotle: survey of thought.Elizabeth Belfiore - 1998 - In Michael Kelly (ed.), Encyclopedia of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press. pp. 1--95.
     
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  14.  52
    C. Gill(trans): Plato, The Symposium. Pp. xlvi + 90. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1999. Paper, £5099. ISBN: 0-14-044616-8.Elizabeth Belfiore - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (2):583-583.
  15.  45
    Plato on Poetry: Ion. P Murray.Elizabeth Belfiore - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (1):20-21.
  16.  26
    The Art of Plato - R. B. Rutherford: The Art of Plato: Ten Essays in Platonic Interpretation. Pp. xv + 335. London: Duckworth, 1995. Cased, £40. ISBN: 0-7156-2641-8.Elizabeth Belfiore - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (1):33-34.
  17.  2
    The Elements of Tragedy.Elizabeth Belfiore - 2009 - In Georgios Anagnostopoulos (ed.), A Companion to Aristotle. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 628–642.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction The Elements of Tragedy and Its Definition Plot and Character Simple and Complex Plots Good and Bad Tragic Plots Conclusion Notes Bibliography.
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  18.  22
    The Emotions of the Ancient Greeks: Studies in Aristotle and Classical Literature (review).Elizabeth S. Belfiore - 2007 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 101 (1):106-107.
  19. Plato and Aristotle on Poetry. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 1990 - Ancient Philosophy 10 (1):138-140.
  20.  56
    Plato on Poetry - P. Murray : Plato on Poetry: Ion; Republic 376e–398b9; Republic 595–608b10 . Pp. x + 250. Cambridge, New York, and Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1996. £37.50/$59.95 . ISBN: 0-521-34182-5. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (1):20-21.
  21.  28
    Aristotle on Comedy. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 1987 - Ancient Philosophy 7:236-239.
  22.  61
    Aristotle on Comedy. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 1987 - Ancient Philosophy 7:236-239.
  23.  7
    Aristotle on Comedy. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 1987 - Ancient Philosophy 7:236-239.
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  24.  91
    Aristotle’s Poetics. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):268-272.
  25.  11
    Aristotle’s Poetics. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):268-272.
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  26.  60
    Plato: Early Socratic Dialogues. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 1990 - Ancient Philosophy 10 (2):280-282.
  27.  51
    Plato on Music, Soul and Body. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):194-198.
  28.  16
    Plato on Poetry. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (1):20-21.
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  29.  7
    Plato, The Symposium. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (2):583-583.
  30.  36
    The Art of Plato. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (1):33-34.
  31.  13
    The Aesthetics of Mimesis. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 2003 - Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):235-239.
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  32.  75
    The Aesthetics of Mimesis. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 2003 - Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):235-239.
  33.  15
    The Symposium[REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (1):20-22.
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  34.  50
    The symposium L. Brisson (trans.): Platon : Le banquet. Pp. 261. PAris: G. F. flammarion, 1998. Paper, frs. 21. isbn: 2-08070987-9. C. J. Rowe: Il symposio di Platone. Cinque lezioni sul dialogo con un ulteriore contributo sul fedone E Una breve discussione con Maurizio Migliori E Arianna fermani. A cura di Maurizio Migliori . Pp. 115. Sankt Augustin: Academia verlag, 1998. Cased. Isbn: 3-89665-091-2. C. J. Rowe: Plato: Symposium (classical texts). Pp. VIII + 231. Warminster: Aris & Phillips, 1998. Paper, £16.50. Isbn: 0-85668-615-. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (01):20-.