18 found
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  1.  58
    Remembering the Details: Effects of Emotion.Elizabeth A. Kensinger - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (2):99-113.
    Though emotion conveys memory benefits, it does not enhance memory equally for all aspects of an experience, nor for all types of emotional events. In this review, I outline the behavioral evidence for arousal's focal enhancements of memory and describe the neural processes that may support those focal enhancements. I also present behavioral evidence to suggest that these focal enhancements occur more often for negative experiences than for positive ones. This result appears to arise because of valence-dependent effects on the (...)
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  2. Consciousness as a Memory System.Andrew E. Budson, Kenneth A. Richman & Elizabeth A. Kensinger - forthcoming - Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology.
    We suggest that there is confusion between why consciousness developed and what additional functions, through continued evolution, it has co-opted. Consider episodic memory. If we believe that episodic memory evolved solely to accurately represent past events, it seems like a terrible system—prone to forgetting and false memories. However, if we believe that episodic memory developed to flexibly and creatively combine and rearrange memories of prior events in order to plan for the future, then it is quite a good system. We (...)
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  3.  23
    Emotion's influence on memory for spatial and temporal context.Katherine Schmidt, Pooja Patnaik & Elizabeth A. Kensinger - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (2):229-243.
  4.  19
    Impact of individual differences upon emotion-induced memory trade-offs.Jill D. Waring, Jessica D. Payne, Daniel L. Schacter & Elizabeth A. Kensinger - 2010 - Cognition and Emotion 24 (1):150-167.
  5.  11
    Reward motivation influences response bias on a recognition memory task.Holly J. Bowen, Michelle L. Marchesi & Elizabeth A. Kensinger - 2020 - Cognition 203:104337.
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  6.  25
    What Factors Need to be Considered to Understand Emotional Memories?Elizabeth A. Kensinger - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (2):120-121.
    In my original review (Kensinger, 2009), I proposed that to understand the effects of emotion on memory accuracy, we must look beyond effects of arousal and consider the contribution of valence. In discussing this proposal, the commentators raise a number of excellent points that hone in on the question of when valence does (and does not) account for emotion's effects on memory accuracy. Though future research will be required to resolve this issue more fully, in this brief response, I address (...)
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  7.  22
    The effect of divided attention on emotion-induced memory narrowing.Katherine R. Mickley Steinmetz, Jill D. Waring & Elizabeth A. Kensinger - 2014 - Cognition and Emotion 28 (5):881-892.
    Individuals are more likely to remember emotional than neutral information, but this benefit does not always extend to the surrounding background information. This memory narrowing is theorised to be linked to the availability of attentional resources at encoding. In contrast to the predictions of this theoretical account, altering participants' attentional resources at encoding by dividing attention did not affect emotion-induced memory narrowing. Attention was divided using three separate manipulations: a digit ordering task (Experiment 1), an arithmetic task (Experiment 2) and (...)
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  8.  15
    Affect enhances object-background associations: evidence from behaviour and mathematical modelling.Christopher R. Madan, Aubrey G. Knight, Elizabeth A. Kensinger & Katherine R. Mickley Steinmetz - 2020 - Cognition and Emotion 34 (5):960-969.
    In recognition memory paradigms, emotional details are often recognised better than neutral ones, but at the cost of memory for peripheral details. We previously provided evidence that, when periph...
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  9.  24
    Neutral details associated with emotional events are encoded: evidence from a cued recall paradigm.Katherine R. Mickley Steinmetz, Aubrey G. Knight & Elizabeth A. Kensinger - 2016 - Cognition and Emotion 30 (7).
  10.  15
    The effect of cognitive reappraisal on the emotional memory trade-off.Allie Steinberger, Jessica D. Payne & Elizabeth A. Kensinger - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (7):1237-1245.
  11.  14
    The effects of cognitive reappraisal and sleep on emotional memory formation.Brandy S. Martinez, Dan Denis, Sara Y. Kim, Carissa H. DiPietro, Christopher Stare, Elizabeth A. Kensinger & Jessica D. Payne - 2023 - Cognition and Emotion 37 (5):942-958.
    Emotion regulation (i.e. either up- or down-regulating affective responses to emotional stimuli) has been shown to modulate long-term emotional memory formation. Further, research has demonstrated that the emotional aspects of scenes are preferentially remembered relative to neutral aspects (known as the emotional memory trade-off effect). This trade-off is often enhanced when sleep follows learning, compared to an equivalent period of time spent awake. However, the interactive effects of sleep and emotion regulation on emotional memory are poorly understood. We presented 87 (...)
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  12.  12
    Memory for the 2008 presidential election in healthy ageing and mild cognitive impairment.Jill D. Waring, Ashley N. Seiger, Paul R. Solomon, Andrew E. Budson & Elizabeth A. Kensinger - 2014 - Cognition and Emotion 28 (8):1407-1421.
  13.  4
    Moral decision-making during the COVID-19 pandemic: Associations with age, negative affect, and negative memory.Ryan T. Daley & Elizabeth A. Kensinger - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    The COVID-19 pandemic provided the opportunity to determine whether age-related differences in utilitarian moral decision-making during sacrificial moral dilemmas extend to non-sacrificial dilemmas in real-world settings. As affect and emotional memory are associated with moral and prosocial behaviors, we also sought to understand how these were associated with moral behaviors during the 2020 spring phase of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. Older age, higher negative affect, and greater reports of reflecting on negative aspects of the pandemic were associated (...)
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  14.  15
    Finding the good in the bad: age and event experience relate to the focus on positive aspects of a negative event.Jaclyn H. Ford, Haley D. DiBiase & Elizabeth A. Kensinger - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (2):414-421.
    All lives contain negative events, but how we think about these events differs across individuals; negative events often include positive details that can be remembered alongside the negative, and the ability to maintain both representations may be beneficial. In a survey examining emotional responses to the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, the current study investigated how this ability shifts as a function of age and individual differences in initial experience of the event. Specifically, this study examined how emotional importance, involvement, and (...)
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  15.  21
    The relation between structural and functional connectivity depends on age and on task goals.Jaclyn H. Ford & Elizabeth A. Kensinger - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  16.  2
    How list composition affects the emotional enhancement of memory in younger and older adults.Sandry M. Garcia, Maureen Ritchey & Elizabeth A. Kensinger - forthcoming - Cognition and Emotion.
    The emotional enhancement of memory (EEM) describes the tendency for emotional information to be remembered better than non-emotional information (Barnacle et al., 2016; Kensinger & Corkin, 2004; T...
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  17. Alzheimer disease.Elizabeth A. Kensinger & Suzanne Corkin - 2002 - In Lynn Nadel (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan.
     
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  18.  27
    Specificity of memory: Implications for individual and collective remembering.Daniel L. Schacter, Angela H. Gutchess & Elizabeth A. Kensinger - 2009 - In Pascal Boyer & James Wertsch (eds.), Memory in Mind and Culture. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 83--111.
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