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  1.  25
    Look at all those big knobs! Online audio technology discourse and sexy gear fetishes.Eliot Bates & Samantha Bennett - 2022 - Convergence 5 (28):1241–1259.
    Despite a predominantly digital, 21st century music production landscape, analogue hardware professional audio technologies persist. In the discoursal throes of the leading online audio technology message forum Gearslutz, such technologies are routinely objectified, sexualized, fetishized and socialized into gear. Situated in a contemporary critical, interdisciplinary framework of fetish, masculinity and sexuality studies, this research interrogates how audio technologies manufactured and intended for music production contexts become sexy. Applying a mixed-mode methodology, including an intensive discourse, image and material-semiotic analysis of an (...)
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  2. Popular Music Studies and the Problems of Sound, Society and Method.Eliot Bates - 2013 - IASPM@Journal 3 (2):15-32.
    Building on Philip Tagg’s timely intervention (2011), I investigate four things in relation to three dominant Anglophone popular music studies journals (Popular Music and Society, Popular Music, and the Journal of Popular Music Studies): 1) what interdisciplinarity or multidisciplinarity means within popular music studies, with a particular focus on the sites of research and the place of ethnographic and/or anthropological approaches; 2) the extent to which popular music studies has developed canonic scholarship, and the citation tendencies present within scholarship on (...)
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  3. What Studios Do.Eliot Bates - 2012 - Journal on the Art of Record Production 7 (1).
    Studios resist reductive analyses. Although isolated, they have their own frontstages and backstages, and like the laboratories studied by Knorr-Cetina, function as more than simply “internal environments.” The placeness of studios leaves both audible traces (the early reflections of sounds) and visible ones, if we think of those studios that become shrines or pilgrimage sites, or photo or video documentation of studios that provide the outside world a brief glimpse into the interior isolation of recording studio life. It would seem (...)
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  4. Ron’s Right Arm: Tactility, Visualization, And The Synesthesia Of Audio Engineering.Eliot Bates - 2009 - Journal on the Art of Record Production 4 (1).
  5.  19
    Vinyl as Event: Record Store Day and the Value-Vibrant Matter Nexus.Eliot Bates - 2020 - Journal of Cultural Economy 6 (13):690–708.
    Why would anyone purchase expensive, natural resource-intensive, and seemingly obsolete material carriers of music when streaming providers provide unlimited access to over 40 million songs for a small monthly fee? As I will show, we can no longer assume that contemporary interest is driven solely by a collector’s market or because of the audible qualities of the vinyl listening experience, and must attend to the many ways people engage with record objects today – and by extension, the vinyl record as (...)
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  6.  29
    Glitches, bugs, and hisses : The degeneration of musical recordings and the contemporary musical work.Eliot Bates - 2004 - In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad music: the music we love to hate. New York: Routledge. pp. 212-225.
    Glitch composition is a meta-discursive practice: rather than writing new music inspired by older recordings, it constructs new music inspired by the technological conditions and limitations in which those recordings emerged. For those listeners who aren’t particularly interested in technology theories, such music is particularly alienating—an in-joke that one doesn’t get. When glitch becomes pop, it loses its theoretical savvy, replacing the “synth pad” in a contemporary pop song. Glitch’s subversion of the bad value judgment placed on damaged media is (...)
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  7.  17
    Resource Ecologies, Political Economies, and the Ethics of Audio Technologies in the Anthropocene.Eliot Bates - 2020 - Popular Music 39 (1):66-87.
    Understanding how recorded and amplified stage musics contribute towards producing the Anthropocene necessitates attending to complex transnational flows of material, capital and labor, and how they coalesce into technological objects. This is complicated by the wide array of sites, practices and knowledges involved during various stages of the production process, from initial resource extraction, to smelting, component manufacturing, technology assembly, and distribution. To develop a suitable technological ethics, and to understand what happens to environments and to human, animal and plant (...)
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  8.  8
    Critical Approaches to the Production of Music and Sound.Eliot Bates & Samantha Bennett - 2018 - New York, NY, USA: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Who produces sound and music? And in what spaces, localities and contexts? As the production of sound and music in the 21st Century converges with multimedia, these questions are critically addressed in this new edited collection by Samantha Bennett and Eliot Bates. Critical Approaches to the Production of Music and Sound features 16 brand new articles by leading thinkers from the fields of music, audio engineering, anthropology and media. Innovative and timely, this collection represents scholars from around the world, revisiting (...)
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  9.  14
    Digital Tradition: Arrangement and Labor in IstanbuL’s Recording Studio Culture.Eliot Bates - 2016 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.
    Istanbul is home to a multimillion dollar transnational music industry, which every year produces thousands of digital music recordings, including widely distributed film and television show soundtracks. Today, this centralized industry is responding to a growing global demand for Turkish, Kurdish, and other Anatolian ethnic language productions, and every year, many of its top-selling records incorporate elaborately orchestrated arrangements of rural folksongs. What accounts for the continuing demand for traditional music in local and diasporic markets? How is tradition produced in (...)
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  10. I na local music store, I recently picked up a copy of In Memoriam.Eliot Bates - 2004 - In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad music: the music we love to hate. New York: Routledge. pp. 275.
     
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  11.  21
    Mixing for Parlak and Bowing for a Büyük Ses: The Aesthetics of Arranged Traditional Music in Turkey.Eliot Bates - 2010 - Ethnomusicology 54 (1):81-105.
    In this paper I explore the production aesthetics that define the sound of most arranged traditional music albums produced in the early 2000s in Istanbul,Turkey. I will focus on two primary aesthetic characteristics, the achievement of which consume much of the labor put into tracking and mix- ing: parlak (“shine”) and büyük ses (“big sound”). Parlak, at its most basic, consists of a pronounced high frequency boost and a pattern of harmonic distortion characteristics,and is often described by studio musicians and (...)
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  12.  19
    The Social Life of Musical Instruments.Eliot Bates - 2012 - Ethnomusicology 56 (3):363-395.
    While ethnomusicologists often write about musical instruments and engage with social theories, these two predilections are typically distinct, and rarely are instruments theorized let alone considered in social terms. Drawing on recent work in Science and Technology Studies, I argue for a study of the social where musical objects (including instruments) and people are actors within patterned heterogeneous networks. I begin with literary examples of instruments framed as having agency, then move to the treatment of instrument-agency within organology. As an (...)
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