Results for 'Electrodynamics Philosophy'

987 found
Order:
  1.  66
    For electrodynamic consistency.Lena Zuchowski - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (2):135-142.
    I will present a refutation of 6 and 7 inconsistency claim. Using the proof by Kiessling, I will show that Classical Electrodynamics can be applied consistently and can preserve energy conservation to the problem of charged, accelerated particles. This refutes the core of Frisch's inconsistency claim. Additionally, I will argue that Frisch's proof and the resulting debate is based on a comparison of different, approximate, explicit solutions to the Maxwell–Lorentz equations. However, in order to be informative on the foundations (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  16
    Toward a philosophy of discovery: Friedrich Steinle’s exploratory experiments: Friedrich Steinle: exploratory experiments: Ampère, Faraday, and the origins of electrodynamics. Translated by Alex Levine. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2016, 494pp, $65.00 HB.Kevin Lambert - 2017 - Metascience 26 (2):297-302.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  66
    Inconsistency, asymmetry, and non-locality: a philosophical investigation of classical electrodynamics.Mathias Frisch - 2005 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Mathias Frisch provides the first sustained philosophical discussion of conceptual problems in classical particle-field theories. Part of the book focuses on the problem of a satisfactory equation of motion for charged particles interacting with electromagnetic fields. As Frisch shows, the standard equation of motion results in a mathematically inconsistent theory, yet there is no fully consistent and conceptually unproblematic alternative theory. Frisch describes in detail how the search for a fundamental equation of motion is partly driven by pragmatic considerations (like (...)
  4. Inconsistency in classical electrodynamics?F. A. Muller - 2007 - Philosophy of Science 74 (2):253-277.
    In a recent issue of this journal, M. Frisch claims to have proven that classical electrodynamics is an inconsistent physical theory. We argue that he has applied classical electrodynamics inconsistently. Frisch also claims that all other classical theories of electromagnetic phenomena, when consistent and in some sense an approximation of classical electrodynamics, are haunted by “serious conceptual problems” that defy resolution. We argue that this claim is based on a partisan if not misleading presentation of theoretical research (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  5. Is classical electrodynamics an inconsistent theory?Gordon Belot - 2007 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (2):263-282.
    Canadian Journal of Philosophy, 37: 263–282. [preprint] This paper is a critical discussion of Mathias Frisch’s book Inconsistency, Asymmetry, and Nonlocality.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  6.  63
    Reflections on Light and Time in the Philosophy of Franciscus Patricius and in the 1905 Paper of Albert Einstein “The Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies”.Eugene E. Ryan - 2006 - Synthesis Philosophica 21 (2):195-208.
    The philosopher Frane Petriċ , particularly in his major works, Discussiones peripateticae and Nova de universis philosophia, devoted a significant part of his studies in ontology and cosmology to a highly original study of light and of time, two of the same concepts that play such an important part in Einstein’s paper of 1905, “The electrodynamics of moving bodies”. By juxtaposing these concepts in the two thinkers, it becomes clear that there is an affinity between the concepts in each (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  68
    Conceptual problems in classical electrodynamics.Mathias Frisch - 2008 - Philosophy of Science 75 (1):93-105.
    In Frisch 2004 and 2005 I showed that the standard ways of modeling particle-field interactions in classical electrodynamics, which exclude the interactions of a particle with its own field, results in a formal inconsistency, and I argued that attempts to include the self-field lead to numerous conceptual problems. In this paper I respond to criticism of my account in Belot 2007 and Muller 2007. I concede that this inconsistency in itself is less telling than I suggested earlier but argue (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  8.  90
    Inconsistency in classical electrodynamics.Mathias Frisch - 2004 - Philosophy of Science 71 (4):525-549.
    I show that the standard approach to modeling phenomena involving microscopic classical electrodynamics is mathematically inconsistent. I argue that there is no conceptually unproblematic and consistent theory covering the same phenomena to which this inconsistent theory can be thought of as an approximation; and I propose a set of conditions for the acceptability of inconsistent theories.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  9. Does quantum electrodynamics have an arrow of time?☆.David Atkinson - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 37 (3):528-541.
    Quantum electrodynamics is a time-symmetric theory that is part of the electroweak interaction, which is invariant under a generalized form of this symmetry, the PCT transformation. The thesis is defended that the arrow of time in electrodynamics is a consequence of the assumption of an initial state of high order, together with the quantum version of the equiprobability postulate.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  10.  23
    Does quantum electrodynamics have an arrow of time?David Atkinson - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 37 (3):528-541.
    Quantum electrodynamics is a time-symmetric theory that is part of the electroweak interaction, which is invariant under a generalized form of this symmetry, the PCT transformation. The thesis is defended that the arrow of time in electrodynamics is a consequence of the assumption of an initial state of high order, together with the quantum version of the equiprobability postulate.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  11.  20
    Electrodynamics from Ampère to Einstein.P. M. Harman - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 33 (2):371-373.
  12.  17
    Does quantum electrodynamics have an arrow of time?David Atkinson - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 37 (3):528-541.
    Quantum electrodynamics is a time-symmetric theory that is part of the electroweak interaction, which is invariant under a generalized form of this symmetry, the PCT transformation. The thesis is defended that the arrow of time in electrodynamics is a consequence of the assumption of an initial state of high order, together with the quantum version of the equiprobability postulate.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  13.  63
    Relativistic mechanics and electrodynamics without one-way velocity assumptions.Carlo Giannoni - 1978 - Philosophy of Science 45 (1):17-46.
    The Conventionality of Simultaneity espoused by Reichenbach, Grunbaum, Edwards, and Winnie is herein extended to mechanics and electrodynamics. The extension is seen to be a special case of a generally covariant formulation of physics, and therefore consistent with Special Relativity as the geometry of flat space-time. Many of the quantities of classical physics, such as mass, charge density, and force, are found to be synchronization dependent in this formulation and, therefore, in Reichenbach's terminology, "metrogenic." The relationship of these quantities (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  14. Maxwell's Paradox: The Metaphysics of Classical Electrodynamics and its Time Reversal Invariance.Valia Allori - 2015 - Analytica: an electronic, open-access journal for philosophy of science 1:1-19.
    In this paper, I argue that the recent discussion on the time - reversal invariance of classical electrodynamics (see (Albert 2000: ch.1), (Arntzenius 2004), (Earman 2002), (Malament 2004),(Horwich 1987: ch.3)) can be best understood assuming that the disagreement among the various authors is actually a disagreement about the metaphysics of classical electrodynamics. If so, the controversy will not be resolved until we have established which alternative is the most natural. It turns out that we have a paradox, namely (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  15.  8
    Non‐Locality in Classical Electrodynamics.Mathias Frisch - 2002 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (1):1-19.
    Classical electrodynamics—if developed consistently, as in Dirac's classical theory of the electron—is causally non‐local. I distinguish two distinct causal locality principles and argue, using Dirac's theory as my main case study, that neither can be reduced to a non‐causal principle of local determinism.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  16. Electrodynamics from ampere to Einstein - Olivier Darrigol, oxford university press, oxford and new York, 2000, XIX+532 pp., UK £75, ISBN 0-19-850594-. [REVIEW]M. P. - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 33 (2):371-373.
  17.  39
    Conceptual problems in classical electrodynamics: No more toils and trouble?Mathias Frisch - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (4):527-531.
    In previous work I have argued that classical electrodynamics is beset by deep conceptual problems, which result from the problem of self-interactions. Symptomatic of these problems, I argued, is that the main approach to modeling the interactions between charges and fields is inconsistent with the principle of energy–momentum conservation. Zuchowski reports a formal result that shows that the so-called ‘Abraham model' of a charged particle satisfies energy–momentum conservation and argues that this result amounts to a refutation of my inconsistency (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  9
    On the symmetries of electrodynamic interactions.Hernán Gustavo Solari & Mario Alberto Natiello - 2022 - Science and Philosophy 10 (2):7-40.
    While mechanics was developed under the idea of reciprocal action (interactions), electromagnetism, as we know it today, takes a form more akin to unilateral action. Interactions call for spatial relations, unilateral action calls for space, just one reference centre. In contrast, interactions are matters of relations that require at least two centres. The development of the relational electromagnetism encouraged by Gauss appears to stop around 1870 for reasons that are not completely clear but are certainly not solely scientific. By the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  89
    Non‐Locality in Classical Electrodynamics.Mathias Frisch - 2002 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (1):1-19.
    in Dirac's classical theory of the electron—is causally non-local. I distinguish two distinct causal locality principles and argue, using Dirac's theory as my main case study, that neither can be reduced to a non-causal principle of local determinism.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  20. A Case for an Empirically Demonstrable Notion of the Vacuum in Quantum Electrodynamics Independent of Dynamical Fluctuations.Mario Bacelar Valente - 2011 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 42 (2):241-261.
    A re-evaluation of the notion of vacuum in quantum electrodynamics is presented, focusing on the vacuum of the quantized electromagnetic field. In contrast to the ‘nothingness’ associated to the idea of classical vacuum, subtle aspects are found in relation to the vacuum of the quantized electromagnetic field both at theoretical and experimental levels. These are not the usually called vacuum effects. The view defended here is that the so-called vacuum effects are not due to the ground state of the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  14
    The Disappearance and Reappearance of Potential Energy in Classical and Quantum Electrodynamics.Charles T. Sebens - 2022 - Foundations of Physics 52 (5):1-30.
    In electrostatics, we can use either potential energy or field energy to ensure conservation of energy. In electrodynamics, the former option is unavailable. To ensure conservation of energy, we must attribute energy to the electromagnetic field and, in particular, to electromagnetic radiation. If we adopt the standard energy density for the electromagnetic field, then potential energy seems to disappear. However, a closer look at electrodynamics shows that this conclusion actually depends on the kind of matter being considered. Although (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  22.  37
    Early quantum electrodynamics.Sam Schweber - 1995 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 26 (2):201-211.
  23.  14
    Early Quantum Electrodynamics.Sam Schweber - 1995 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 26 (2):201-211.
  24.  27
    Magnetrons and quantum electrodynamics: Engineering and physics in the case of tomonaga Sin-itiro.Kenji Ito - 2017 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 60:110-122.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  40
    Symmetry and asymmetry in electrodynamics from Rowland to Einstein.Giora Hon & Bernard R. Goldstein - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 37 (4):635-660.
  26. Frisch, Muller, and Belot on an inconsistency in classical electrodynamics.Peter Vickers - 2008 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (4):767-792.
    This paper follows up a debate as to whether classical electrodynamics is inconsistent. Mathias Frisch makes the claim in Inconsistency, Asymmetry and Non-Locality ([2005]), but this has been quickly countered by F. A. Muller ([2007]) and Gordon Belot ([2007]). Here I argue that both Muller and Belot fail to connect with the background assumptions that support Frisch's claim. Responding to Belot I explicate Frisch's position in more detail, before providing my own criticisms. Correcting Frisch's position, I find that I (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  27.  39
    On Einstein's 1905 electrodynamics paper.W. L. Kennedy - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 36 (1):61-65.
  28.  6
    On Einstein's 1905 electrodynamics paper.W. L. Kennedy - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 36 (1):61-65.
  29.  55
    Hidden Underdetermination: A Case Study in Classical Electrodynamics.Wolfgang Pietsch - 2012 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 26 (2):125-151.
    In this article, I present a case study of underdetermination in nineteenth-century electrodynamics between a pure field theory and a formulation in terms of action at a distance. A particular focus is on the question if and how this underdetermination is eventually resolved. It turns out that after a period of overt underdetermination, during which the approaches are developed separately, the two programmes are merged. On the basis of this development, I argue that the original underdetermination survives in hidden (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  30.  25
    Interpretive strategies for deductively insecure theories: The case of early quantum electrodynamics.Bihui Li - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (4):395-403.
    I describe some interpretive strategies used by physicists in the development of quantum electrodynamics in the 1930s and 1940s, using Wimsatt's account of how to reason with false models as a guide. I call these “interpretive” strategies because they were used not just to derive empirical predictions, but also to derive information about the world besides the aforementioned predictions. These strategies were regarded as mathematically unrigorous, yet they were crucial to the development of a better theory of quantum (...). I argue that these strategies are not easily assimilated into conventional axiomatic, deductivist views of what theories tell us about the world. Furthermore, it is unclear if these strategies are necessarily less reliable than strategies based solely on mathematically rigorous inferences. I suggest that these less than fully rigorous strategies are worth considering as general strategies for working with theories in physics. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31.  51
    Discussion note: Conceptual problems in classical electrodynamics.Mathias Frisch - 2008 - Philosophy of Science 75 (1):93-105.
    I have argued that the standard ways of modeling classical particle-field interactions rely on a set of inconsistent assumptions. This claim has been criticized in (Muller forthcoming). In this paper I respond to some of Muller's criticism.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  32. Is preacceleration of particles in dirac's electrodynamics a case of backward causation? The myth of retrocausation in classical electrodynamics.Adolf Grünbaum - 1976 - Philosophy of Science 43 (2):165-201.
    Is it a "conceptual truth" or only a logically contingent fact that, in any given kind of case, an event x which asymmetrically causes ("produces") an event y likewise temporally precedes y or at least does not temporally succeed y? A bona fide physical example in which the cause retroproduces the effect would show that backward causation is no less conceptually possible than forward causation. And it has been claimed ([9], p. 151; [4], p. 41) that in Dirac's classical (...) (relativistic and non-relativistic), the preacceleration of charged particles before any forces are applied to them furnishes a genuine case of retrocausation by later forces. An exposition of the pertinent physics furnishes the basis for arguing the following: Whereas the non-zero acceleration of a neutral NEWTONIAN mass particle is, of course, causally connected as such to the simultaneously applied non-zero force, the non-zero acceleration of a DIRACIAN charged particle is not causally connected at all as such to the applied forces. A fortiori, in Dirac's electrodynamics, the applied forces do not qualify asymmetrically as the causes of a non-zero acceleration as such; nor does a non-zero acceleration as such qualify as an effect produced by forces. This is shown by means of two considerations as follows: (1) In Dirac's theory, no functional dependence of the value of a non-zero acceleration on the weighted time-average of the forces is vouchsafed as a matter of physical LAW alone without any value of a constant of integration, just as no Newtonian law(s) alone can guarantee a functional dependence of the non-zero value of the velocity of a Newtonian mass particle on the applied forces. Instead, both functional dependencies alike are vouchsafed only with the crucial aid of some de facto boundary condition pertaining to either the past or to the furute, so that (2) Non-zero preaccelerations of Diracian charged particles can no more be causally attributed as such to the retrocausal action of later forces than non-zero "prevelocities" of Newtonian mass particles can be held to be caused as such by later applied forces. The retrocausal interpretation of Dirac's preaccelerations is just as invalid as the retrocausal interpretation of Newtonian prevelocities. (shrink)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  33.  37
    On Grunbaum and retrocausation in classical electrodynamics.Charles Nissim-Sabat - 1979 - Philosophy of Science 46 (1):118-135.
    A detailed analysis is made of Grunbaum's claim that the Abraham-Lorentz (AL) and Dirac-Lorentz (DL) equations have no bearing on causality. It is pointed out that (a) both equations are derived from F = ma, and thus should obey the same causality conditions as Newton's law, (b) independently of what boundary conditions are imposed, non-causal behavior is always along the same straight line as the force, (c) the distinction in status between laws and boundary conditions which Grunbaum imposes is one (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  36
    On conceptual issues in classical electrodynamics: Prospects and problems of an action-at-a-distance interpretation.Wolfgang Pietsch - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 41 (1):67-77.
  35.  43
    Retrocausation and the formal assimilation of classical electrodynamics to Newtonian mechanics: A reply to Nissim-Sabat's "on Grunbaum and retrocausation".Adolf Grünbaum & Allen I. Janis - 1979 - Philosophy of Science 46 (1):136-160.
    Dirac's classical electrodynamics countenances "preaccelerations" of charged particles at a time t as mathematical functions of external forces applied after the time t. These preaccelerations have been interpreted as evidence for physical retrocausation upon assuming that, in electrodynamics no less than in Newton's second law, external forces sustain an asymmetric causal relation to accelerations. And this retrocausal interpretation has just been defended against the critiques in (Grunbaum 1976), (Grunbaum and Janis, 1977 and 1978) by appeal to the formal (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36.  48
    Henri Poincare's criticism of fin de siecle electrodynamics.Olivier Darrigol - 1995 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 26 (1):1-44.
  37.  19
    Reassessing the Ritz–Einstein debate on the radiation asymmetry in classical electrodynamics.Mathias Frisch & Wolfgang Pietsch - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 55:13-23.
  38.  21
    Henri Poincaré's criticism of Fin De Siècle electrodynamics.Olivier Darrigol - 1995 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 26 (1):1-44.
  39.  73
    Is there backward causation in classical electrodynamics?Adolf Grünbaum & Allen I. Janis - 1977 - Journal of Philosophy 74 (8):475-482.
  40.  83
    The utility of Naturalness, and how its application to Quantum Electrodynamics envisages the Standard Model and Higgs boson.James D. Wells - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 49:102-108.
  41.  76
    Léon Rosenfeld and the challenge of the vanishing momentum in quantum electrodynamics.Donald Salisbury - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 40 (4):363-373.
  42. The gravitational force between mechanics and electrodynamics.Jurgen Renn, Jonathan Zenneck, Hendrik A. Lorentz, Immanuel Friedlaender & August FÖPPL - 2007 - Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 250.
  43.  34
    Feynman's space-time view in quantum electrodynamics.Marco Forgione - 2022 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 93 (C):136-148.
  44.  34
    Inconsistency, Asymmetry, and Non-Locality: A Philosophical Investigation of Classical Electrodynamics.Richard Healey - 2008 - Philosophical Review 117 (3):458-462.
  45. The Methodological Problems of Theory Unification (in the context of Maxwell's fusion of optics and electrodynamics).Rinat M. Nugayev - 2016 - Philosophy of Science and Technology (Moscow) 21 (2).
    It is discerned what light can bring the recent historical reconstructions of maxwellian optics and electromagnetism unification on the following philosophical/methodological questions. I. Why should one believe that Nature is ultimately simple and that unified theories are more likely to be true? II. What does it mean to say that a theory is unified? III. Why theory unification should be an epistemic virtue? To answer the questions posed genesis and development of Maxwellian electrodynamics are elucidated. It is enunciated that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  72
    Einstein and special relativity. Some inconsistencies in his electrodynamics.E. G. Cullwick - 1981 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 32 (2):167-176.
  47.  29
    Baconian bees in the electromagnetic fields: Experimenter-theorists in nineteenth-century electrodynamics.Olivier Darrigol - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 30 (3):307-345.
  48.  14
    Baconian Bees in the Electromagnetic Fields: Experimenter-Theorists In Nineteenth-Century Electrodynamics.Olivier Darrigol - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 30 (3):307-345.
  49.  37
    Logical Economy in Einstein's "On The Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies".Robert B. Williamson - 1977 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 8 (1):49.
  50.  7
    Evolution: classical philosophy meets quantum science.Somnath Bhattacharyya - 2023 - Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.
    This book reconceptualizes the ancient philosophy of "dualism" and a "trinity" applied to classical and quantum nonequilibrium phenomena. In addition to classical mechanics and electrodynamics, a remarkable connection of this philosophy with quantum mechanics is established which can be useful for quantum computing and the development of quantum artificial intelligence. Packed with the recent theoretical models, quantum simulations of black holes, and experimental observations of quantum phase transitions, this book brings a holistic approach that can be useful (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 987