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Eleanor H. Kuykendall [6]Eleanor Hope Kuykendall [1]
  1. Sorcerer Love: A Reading of Plato's Symposium, Diotima's Speech.Luce Irigaray & Eleanor H. Kuykendall - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (3):32 - 44.
    "Sorcerer Love" is the name that Luce Irigaray gives to the demonic function of love as presented in Plato's Symposium. She argues that Socrates there attributes two incompatible positions to Diotima, who in any case is not present at the banquet. The first is that love is a mid-point or intermediary between lovers which also teaches immortality. The second is that love is a means to the end and duty of procreation, and thus is a mere means to immortality through (...)
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    Sorcerer Love: A Reading of Plato's Symposium, Diotima's Speech.Luce Irigaray & Eleanor H. Kuykendall - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (3):32-44.
    “Sorcerer Love” is the name that Luce Irigaray gives to the demonic function of love as presented in Plato's Symposium. She argues that Socrates there attributes two incompatible positions to Diotima, who in any case is not present at the banquet. The first is that love is a mid-point or intermediary between lovers which also teaches immortality. The second is that love is a means to the end and duty of procreation, and thus is a mere means to immortality through (...)
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  3.  21
    Subverting Essentialisms.Eléanor H. Kuykendall - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (3):208-217.
    A critical analysis of Diana Fuss's Essentially Speaking: Feminism, Nature, and Difference (1989a) and Elizabeth Grosz's Sexual Subversions: Three French Feminists (1989).
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    Introduction to “Sorcerer Love,” by Luce Irigaray.Eleanor H. Kuykendall - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (3):28-31.
    "Sorcerer Love" is the name that Luce Irigaray gives to the demonic function of love as presented in Plato's Symposium. She argues that Socrates there attributes two incompatible positions to Diotima, who in any case is not present at the banquet. The first is that love is a mid-point or intermediary between lovers which also teaches immortality. The second is that love is a means to the end and duty of procreation, and thus is a mere means to immortality through (...)
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