9 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Ekow N. Yankah [9]Ekow Nyansa Yankah [1]
  1.  14
    Legal Hypocrisy.Ekow N. Yankah - 2019 - Ratio Juris 32 (1):2-20.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2.  45
    Punishing Them All: How Criminal Justice Should Account for Mass Incarceration.Ekow N. Yankah - 2020 - Res Philosophica 97 (2):185-218.
    The piece returns to my earlier challenges of retributivism as the basis of contemporary criminal law, advancing my work on republican political justifications that make central the effect of punishment on citizenship. In short, the justification of punishment should eschew individual retributivist “desert” and focus primarily on the effects of punishment on the entire polity. In particular, this would mean that the effects of mass incarceration would be explicitly a part of justification of punishment. Concretized, members of communities where widespread (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  36
    Republican Responsibility in Criminal Law.Ekow N. Yankah - 2015 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 9 (3):457-475.
    Retributivism so dominates criminal theory that lawyers, legal scholars and law students assert with complete confidence that criminal law is justified only in light of violations of another person’s rights. Yet the core tenet of retributivism views criminal law fundamentally through the lens of individual actors, rendering both offender and victim unrecognizably denuded from their social and civic context. Doing so means that retributivism is unable to explain even our most basic criminal law practices, such as why we punish recidivists (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  4.  26
    Legal Vices and Civic Virtue: Vice Crimes, Republicanism and the Corruption of Lawfulness. [REVIEW]Ekow N. Yankah - 2013 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):61-82.
    Vice crimes, crimes prohibited in part because they are viewed as morally corrupting, engage legal theorists because they reveal importantly contrasting views between liberals and virtue-centered theorists on the very limits of legitimate state action. Yet advocates and opponents alike focus on the role law can play in suppressing personal vice; the role of law is seen as suppressing licentiousness, sloth, greed etc. The most powerful advocates of the position that the law must nurture good character often draw on Aristotelian (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5.  50
    Crime, Freedom and Civic Bonds: Arthur Ripstein’s Force and Freedom: Kant’s Legal and Political Philosophy. [REVIEW]Ekow N. Yankah - 2012 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (2):255-272.
    There is no question Arthur Ripstein’s Force and Freedom is an engaging and powerful book which will inform legal philosophy, particularly Kantian theories, for years to come. The text explores with care Kant’s legal and political philosophy, distinguishing it from his better known moral theory. Nor is Ripstein’s book simply a recounting of Kant’s legal and political theory. Ripstein develops Kant’s views in his own unique vision illustrating fresh ways of viewing the entire Kantian project. But the same strength and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  41
    When Justice Can’T Be Done: The Obligation to Govern and Rights in the State of Terror. [REVIEW]Ekow N. Yankah - 2012 - Law and Philosophy 31 (6):643-672.
    This article explores a view nearly absent from modern political theory, that there is a duty to create and secure government which imposes on some a duty to govern. This duty is grounded in philosophers as disparate as Aquinas, Locke, Hobbes and Finnis. To fail one's duty to govern, especially over the range of goods that can only be secured by government, is to have committed a wrong against another. If there is an obligation to govern that is rooted in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  9
    Whose Burden to Bear? Privilege, Lawbreaking and Race.Ekow N. Yankah - 2019 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 16 (1):13-28.
    Tommie Shelby’s Dark Ghettos: Injustice, Dissent, and Reform is a powerful indictment of how the basic structure of American institutions fail the seriously disadvantaged. Though motivated by what we collectively owe “ghetto” citizens, when exploring criminal law, Shelby instinctively turns his attention to what duties, if any, the disadvantaged have to obey the criminal law. This paper argues that our persistent focus on the obligations of the disadvantaged is a mistake. Instead, we should examine the duties of the advantaged to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  12
    Review of Peter de Marneffe, Liberalism and Prostitution[REVIEW]Ekow N. Yankah - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (4).
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  16
    The Law of Duty and the Virtue of Justice.Ekow Nyansa Yankah - 2008 - Criminal Justice Ethics 27 (1):67-77.
    In his new book, The Grammar of Criminal Law: American, Comparative, and International, celebrated criminal law theorist George Fletcher excavates criminal law doctrine across a number of countries and cultures to reveal a small number of basic shared structures. Among these structures Fletcher argues that it is a criminal law justified by Kantian legal morality, in contrast to perfectionist or communitarian theories, that is legitimate. Thus, Fletcher proposes, along with legal positivists, that the validity of legal norms does not turn (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark