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Edward Slingerland [30]Edward Gilman Slingerland [8]Edward G. Slingerland [2]
  1. The Situationist Critique and Early Confucian Virtue Ethics.Edward Slingerland - 2011 - Ethics 121 (2):390-419.
    This article argues that strong versions of the situationist critique of virtue ethics are empirically and conceptually unfounded, as well as that, even if one accepts that the predictive power of character may be limited, this is not a fatal problem for early Confucian virtue ethics. Early Confucianism has explicit strategies for strengthening and expanding character traits over time, as well as for managing a variety of situational forces. The article concludes by suggesting that Confucian virtue ethics represents a more (...)
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  2.  37
    The Cultural Evolution of Prosocial Religions.Ara Norenzayan, Azim F. Shariff, Will M. Gervais, Aiyana K. Willard, Rita A. McNamara, Edward Slingerland & Joseph Henrich - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39:1-86.
    We develop a cultural evolutionary theory of the origins of prosocial religions and apply it to resolve two puzzles in human psychology and cultural history: the rise of large-scale cooperation among strangers and, simultaneously, the spread of prosocial religions in the last 10–12 millennia. We argue that these two developments were importantly linked and mutually energizing. We explain how a package of culturally evolved religious beliefs and practices characterized by increasingly potent, moralizing, supernatural agents, credible displays of faith, and other (...)
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  3.  96
    Effortless Action: Wu-Wei as Conceptual Metaphor and Spiritual Ideal in Early China.Edward Gilman Slingerland - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    This book presents a systematic account of the role of the personal spiritual ideal of wu-wei--literally "no doing," but better rendered as "effortless action"--in early Chinese thought. Edward Slingerland's analysis shows that wu-wei represents the most general of a set of conceptual metaphors having to do with a state of effortless ease and unself-consciousness. This concept of effortlessness, he contends, serves as a common ideal for both Daoist and Confucian thinkers. He also argues that this concept contains within itself a (...)
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  4. Confucius Analects: With Selections From Traditional Commentaries.Edward G. Slingerland - 2003 - Hackett Publishing.
     
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  5.  91
    What Science Offers the Humanities: Integrating Body and Culture.Edward Slingerland - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    What Science Offers the Humanities examines some of the deep problems facing the study of culture. It focuses on the excesses of postmodernism, but also acknowledges serious problems with postmodernism's harshest critics. In short, Edward Slingerland argues that in order for the humanities to progress, its scholars need to take seriously contributions from the natural sciences - and particular research on human cognition - which demonstrate that any separation of the mind and the body is entirely untenable. The author provides (...)
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  6.  1
    Trying Not to Try: Ancient China, Modern Science, and the Power of Spontaneity.Edward Gilman Slingerland - 2014 - New York: Broadway Books.
    Exploring the power of spontaneity, an ancient Chinese virtue, this book, based on new research in psychology and neuroscience, reveals why it is essential to individual and societal well-being.
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  7.  2
    Analects: With Selections From Traditional Commentaries. Confucius & Edward Gilman Slingerland - 2003 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    This edition goes beyond others that largely leave readers to their own devices in understanding this cryptic work, by providing an entrée into the text that parallels the traditional Chinese way of approaching it: alongside Slingerland's exquisite rendering of the work are his translations of a selection of classic Chinese commentaries that shed light on difficult passages, provide historical and cultural context, and invite the reader to ponder a range of interpretations. The ideal student edition, this volume also includes a (...)
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  8.  86
    The Prevalence of Mind–Body Dualism in Early China.Edward Slingerland & Maciej Chudek - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (5):997-1007.
    We present the first large-scale, quantitative examination of mind and body concepts in a set of historical sources by measuring the predictions of folk mind–body dualism against the surviving textual corpus of pre-Qin (pre-221 BCE) China. Our textual analysis found clear patterns in the historically evolving reference of the word xin (heart/heart–mind): It alone of the organs was regularly contrasted with the physical body, and during the Warring States period it became less associated with emotions and increasingly portrayed as the (...)
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  9. Material Virtue: Ethics and the Body in Early China.Mark Csikszentmihalyi, Anna Gade, Saba Mahmood & Edward Slingerland - 2007 - Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (4):713-728.
    The turn to descriptive studies of ethics is inspired by the sense that our ethical theorizing needs to engage ethnography, history, and literature in order to address the full complexity of ethical life. This article examines four books that describe the cultivation of virtue in diverse cultural contexts, two concerning early China and two concerning Islam in recent years. All four emphasize the significance of embodiment, and they attend to the complex ways in which choice and agency interact with the (...)
     
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  10.  2
    Mind and Body in Early China: Beyond Orientalism and the Myth of Holism.Edward Slingerland - 2018 - Oup Usa.
    Mind and Body in Early China critiques Orientalist accounts of early China as a radical "holistic" other, which saw no qualitative difference between mind and body. Drawing on knowledge and techniques from the sciences and digital humanities, Edward Slingerland demonstrates that seeing a difference between mind and body is a psychological universal, and that human sociality would be fundamentally impossible without it. This book has implications for anyone interested in comparative religion, early China, cultural studies, digital humanities, or science-humanities integration.
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  11. Conceptions of the Self in the Zhuangzi: Conceptual Metaphor Analysis and Comparative Thought.Edward Gilman Slingerland - 2004 - Philosophy East and West 54 (3):322 - 342.
    The purpose here is to explore metaphorical conceptions of the self in a fourth century B.C.E. Chinese text, the Zhuangzi, from the perspective of cognitive linguistics and the contemporary theory of metaphor. It is argued that the contemporary theory of metaphor provides scholars with an exciting new theoretical grounding for the study of comparative thought, as well as a concrete methodology for undertaking the comparative project. What is seen when the Zhuangzi is examined from the perspective of metaphor theory is (...)
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  12.  61
    Metaphor and Meaning in Early China.Edward Slingerland - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (1):1-30.
    Western scholarship on early Chinese thought has tended to either dismiss the foundational role of metaphor or to see it as a uniquely Chinese mode of apprehending the world. This article argues that, while human cognition is in fact profoundly dependent on imagistic conceptual structures, such dependence is by no means a unique feature of Chinese thought. The article reviews empirical evidence supporting the claims that human thought is fundamentally imagistic; that sensorimotor schemas are often used to structure our understanding (...)
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  13.  80
    Virtue Ethics, the "Analects," and the Problem of Commensurability.Edward Slingerland - 2001 - Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (1):97 - 125.
    In support of the thesis that virtue ethics allows for a more comprehensive and consistent interpretation of the "Analects" than other possible models, the author uses a structural outline of a virtue ethic (derived from Alasdair MacIntyre's account of the Aristotelian tradition) to organize a discussion of the text. The resulting interpretation focuses attention on the religious aspects of Confucianism and accounts for aspects of the text that are otherwise difficult to explain. In addition, the author argues that the structural (...)
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  14.  24
    Creating Consilience: Integrating the Sciences and the Humanities.Edward Slingerland & Mark Collard (eds.) - 2012 - Oup Usa.
    This volume takes a new approach to bridging the cultures of science and the humanities. The editors and contributors formulate how to develop a new shared framework of consilience beyond mere interdisciplinarity, in a way that both sides can accept.
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  15.  26
    Impartial Institutions, Pathogen Stress and the Expanding Social Network.Daniel Hruschka, Charles Efferson, Ting Jiang, Ashlan Falletta-Cowden, Sveinn Sigurdsson, Rita McNamara, Madeline Sands, Shirajum Munira, Edward Slingerland & Joseph Henrich - 2014 - Human Nature 25 (4):567-579.
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  16.  17
    Parochial Prosocial Religions: Historical and Contemporary Evidence for a Cultural Evolutionary Process.Ara Norenzayan, Azim F. Shariff, Will M. Gervais, Aiyana K. Willard, Rita A. McNamara, Edward Slingerland & Joseph Henrich - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  17.  26
    Virtue Ethics, The.Edward Slingerland - 2001 - Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (1):97-125.
    In support of the thesis that virtue ethics allows for a more comprehensive and consistent interpretation of the "Analects" than other possible models, the author uses a structural outline of a virtue ethic to organize a discussion of the text. The resulting interpretation focuses attention on the religious aspects of Confucianism and accounts for aspects of the text that are otherwise difficult to explain. In addition, the author argues that the structural similarities between the Aristotelian and Confucian conceptions of self-cultivation (...)
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  18.  62
    The Problem of Moral Spontaneity in the Guodian Corpus.Edward Slingerland - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (3):237-256.
    This paper discusses certain conceptual tensions in a set of archeological texts from the Warring States period, the Guodian corpus. One of the central themes of the Guodian corpus is the disanalogy between spontaneous, natural familial relationships and artificial political relationships. This is problematic because, like many early Chinese texts, the Guodian corpus believes that political relationships must come to be characterized by unselfconsciousness and spontaneity if social order is to prevail. This tension will be compared to my earlier work (...)
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  19.  12
    Zhu Xi's Reading of the Analects: Canon, Commentary, and the Classical Tradition.Edward Slingerland & Daniel K. Gardner - 2003 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 123 (3):677.
  20.  14
    Metaphor, Blending, and Cultural Variation: A Reply to Camus.Edward Slingerland - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (3):431-435.
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  21.  60
    “Of What Use Are the Odes? ” Cognitive Science, Virtue Ethics, and Early Confucian Ethics.Edward Slingerland - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (1):80-109.
    In his well-known 1994 work Descartes’ Error, the neuroscientist Antonio Damasio describes his work with patients suffering from damage to the prefrontal cortex, a center of emotion processing in the brain. The accidents or strokes that had caused this damage had spared these patients’ “higher” cognitive faculties: their short- and long-term memories, abstract reasoning skills, mathematical aptitude, and performance on standard IQ tests were completely unimpaired. They were also perfectly healthy physically, with no apparent motor or sensory disabilities. Nonetheless, these (...)
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  22. The Essential Analects: Selected Passages with Traditional Commentary. Confucius & Edward Gilman Slingerland - 2006 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    _The Essential Analects_ offers a representative selection from Edward Slingerland's acclaimed translation of the full work, including passages covering all major themes. An appendix of selected traditional commentaries keyed to each passage provides access to the text and to its reception and interpretation. Also included are a glossary of terms and short biographies of the disciples of Confucius and the traditional commentators cited.
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  23.  17
    Toward an Empirically Responsible Ethics: Cognitive Science, Virtue Ethics, and Effortless Attention in Early Chinese Thought.Edward Slingerland - 2010 - In Brian Bruya (ed.), Effortless Attention: A New Perspective in the Cognitive Science of Attention and Action. MIT Press. pp. 247--286.
    This chapter reviews how human reasoning and decision making evolves from the cognitive sciences, challenging basic assumptions of objectivism-rationalism along with ethical models based on reason. It emphasizes the significance of effortless attention in human reasoning and suggests that virtue ethics is preferable to authoritative thinking. By examining an early text from China, entitled “Analects of Confucius,” the chapter demonstrates how effortless attention and action can be developed and incorporated into moral behavior. This text is an important source of evidence (...)
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  24.  21
    10. Larry May, Genocide: A Normative Account Larry May, Genocide: A Normative Account (Pp. 465-469).David Copp, Gerald Gaus, Henry S. Richardson, William A. Edmundson, David Estlund & Edward Slingerland - 2011 - Ethics 121 (2):301-334.
  25.  34
    Chinese Thought From an Evolutionary Perspective. [REVIEW]Edward Gilman Slingerland - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (3):375 - 388.
  26. Effortless Action: Wu-Wei as a Spiritual Ideal in Early China.Edward Gilman Slingerland - 1998 - Dissertation, Stanford University
    This dissertation has two major theses. The first is that the concept of "wu-wei" serves as a spiritual ideal for a group of five pre-Qin thinkers--Confucius, Laozi, Mencius, Zhuangzi and Xunzi--who share what might be called the "mainstream" Chinese worldview, and that this concept serves as a soteriological goal and spiritual ideal that cannot be understood except within the context of this worldview. More specifically, this worldview is primarily characterized by the belief that there is a normative order to the (...)
     
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  27.  64
    Review of Material Virtue: Ethics and the Body in Early China by Mark Csikszentmihalyi. [REVIEW]Edward Gilman Slingerland - 2006 - Philosophy East and West 56 (4):694-699.
    The turn to descriptive studies of ethics is inspired by the sense that our ethical theorizing needs to engage ethnography, history, and literature in order to address the full complexity of ethical life. This article examines four books that describe the cultivation of virtue in diverse cultural contexts, two concerning early China and two concerning Islam in recent years. All four emphasize the significance of embodiment, and they attend to the complex ways in which choice and agency interact with the (...)
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  28.  20
    Response to Jim Behuniak.Edward Slingerland - 2019 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 18 (3):485-488.
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  29.  62
    The Challenges of Qualitatively Coding Ancient Texts.Edward Slingerland & Maciej Chudek - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (2):183-186.
    We respond to several important and valid concerns about our study (“The Prevalence of Folk Dualism in Early China,”Cognitive Science 35: 997–1007) by Klein and Klein, defending our interpretation of our data. We also argue that, despite the undeniable challenges involved in qualitatively coding texts from ancient cultures, the standard tools used throughout the cognitive sciences—large quantities of data, coders as blind to the hypothesis as possible, intercoder reliability measures, and statistical analysis—allow the noise of randomly distributed interpretative differences to (...)
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  30. Book Review. [REVIEW]Edward Slingerland - 2003 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 123 (3):677-679.
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  31. Classical Confucianism (I) : Confucius and the Lun-Yü.Edward Slingerland - 2008 - In Bo Mou (ed.), Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.
     
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  32. Creating Consilience: Issues and Case Studies in Teh Integration of the Sciences and Humanities.Edward Slingerland & Mark Collard (eds.) - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
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  33.  13
    Reply to Prof. Moeller’s Response.Edward Slingerland - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):537-539.
  34.  11
    Big Gods, Historical Explanation, and the Value of Integrating the History of Religion Into the Broader Academy.Edward Slingerland - 2015 - Religion 45 (4):585-602.
    This article discusses critiques raised by historians of religion concerning Ara Norenzayan's Big Gods: How Religion Transformed Cooperation and Conflict (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013), offering some defense of Norenzayan's position, but also discussing in detail the more substantive challenges. It concludes with some reflections on the current position of the history of religion within the Academy, and an argument for why large-scale explanatory projects and interdisciplinary collaboration should be part of the future of our field.
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  35.  30
    The Ambivalence of Creation: Debates Concerning Innovation and Artifice in Early China.Edward Slingerland - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (1):131–134.
  36.  14
    Crafting Bowls, Cultivating Sprouts: Unavoidable Tensions in Early Chinese Confucianism.Edward Slingerland - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (2):211-218.
  37.  8
    The Ambivalence of Creation: Debates Concerning Innovation and Artifice in Early China. By Michael J. Puett.Edward Slingerland - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (1):131-134.
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  38.  11
    Reply to E. Bruce Brooks and A. Taeko Brooks. [REVIEW]Edward Slingerland - 2000 - Philosophy East and West 50 (1):146 - 147.
  39.  25
    Review: Why Philosophy Is Not "Extra" in Understanding the Analects. [REVIEW]Edward Slingerland - 2000 - Philosophy East and West 50 (1):137 - 141.
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  40.  7
    Conceptual Blending, Somatic Marking, and Normativity: A Case Example From Ancient Chinese.Edward G. Slingerland - 2005 - Cognitive Linguistics 16 (3).