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  1. Re-evaluating evidence for linguistic relativity: Reply to Boroditsky (2001).David January & Edward Kako - 2007 - Cognition 104 (2):417-426.
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    Information Sources for Noun Learning.Edward Kako - 2005 - Cognitive Science 29 (2):223-260.
    Why are some words easier to learn than others? And what enables the eventual learning of the more difficult words? These questions were addressed for nouns using a paradigm in which adults were exposed to naturalistic maternal input that was manipulated to simulate access to several different information sources, both alone and in combination: observation of the extralinguistic contexts in which the target word was used, the words that co‐occurred with the target word, and the target word's syntactic context. Words (...)
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  3. Number 1 Regular articles.Edward Kako - 2006 - Cognition 101:547-549.
     
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    The promise of an ecological, evolutionary approach to culture and language.Edward Kako - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):338-339.
    Dichotomous definitions of culture and language do not generate productive questions. Instead, more progress can be made by identifying components of each that other animals might plausibly possess. The evolutionary, ecological approach advocated by Rendell and Whitehead holds great promise for helping us to understand the conditions under which natural selection can favor similar capacities in differently organized brains.
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    What ape language research means for representations.Edward Kako - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):629-629.
    Shanker & King (S&K) rightly stress that recent ape language research has important implications for language development and origins. But the evidence does not warrant their conclusion that we can dispense with representations. Indeed, their own discussion of the nature of communication highlights the central role that representations must play in our models of communicative competence, in and out of language.
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