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  1.  75
    Hegel on War.Edward Black - 1973 - The Monist 57 (4):570-583.
    Because it is too important to be left to generals war is important enough to be studied by philosophy. The use of themselves as a force has no history and animals fight and have a history but do not wage war and make history. War takes life and creates a way of life. Don Quixote wishes to see in hell the inventor of “the dreadful fury of those devilish instruments of artillery … which is the cause that very often a (...)
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  2.  87
    Aristotle’s ‘Essentialism’ and Quine’s Cycling Mathematician.Edward Black - 1968 - The Monist 52 (2):288-297.
    As Aristotle before him, Quine has earned a just renown for his exposure of untenable dualisms: he is best-known, of course, for his rejection of the ‘dogma’ of the radical distinction between analytic and synthetic truths. But another dualism which Quine has no use for has scarcely caused a murmuring in the assembly of philosophers, where Quine’s opposition to the analytic-synthetic dichotomy placed him on the far left, because on this matter he has aligned himself with the philosophical right, with (...)
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  3.  66
    Religion and Philosophy In Hegel’s Philosophy of Religion.Edward Black - 1977 - The Monist 60 (2):198-212.
    In 1837 an eighteen-year old maker of verse epigrams wrote of Hegel.
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