63 found
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  1. Truly funny: Humor, irony, and satire as moral criticism.E. M. Dadlez - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (1):1-17.
    Comparatively speaking, philosophy has not been especially long-winded in attempting to answer questions about what is funny and why we should think so. There is the standard debate of many centuries’ standing between superiority and incongruity accounts of humor, which for the most part attempt to identify the intentional objects of our amusement.1 There is the more recent debate about humor and morality, about whether jokes themselves may be regarded as immoral or about whether it can in certain circumstances be (...)
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  2.  9
    Tattoos Can Sometimes Be Art: A Modest Embellishment of Stephen Davies’s Adornment.E. M. Dadlez - 2021 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 79 (4):499-503.
    Stephen Davies offers a compelling account of adornment as a form of aesthetic enhancement that aims either to intensify or to contribute to beauty and sublimit.
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  3.  48
    Spectacularly bad: Hume and Aristotle on tragic spectacle.E. M. Dadlez - 2005 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (4):351–358.
  4.  48
    Comment on “Standing Conditions and Blame” by Amy McKiernan.E. M. Dadlez - 2016 - Southwest Philosophy Review 32 (2):49-52.
  5. Fiction, emotion, and rationality.E. M. Dadlez - 1996 - British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (3):290-304.
  6.  18
    Not Sitting Down for It: How Stand‐Up Differs from Fiction.E. M. Dadlez - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (4):513-524.
    ABSTRACT One of the standard defenses of Daniel Tosh, Andrew Dice Clay, Bernard Manning, and other stand-up comedians who have been accused of crossing moral lines is that the responses they elicit belong to an aesthetic rather than a moral domain to which standard methods of ethical evaluation are therefore inapplicable. I argue, first, that fictionality does not confer immunity to ethical criticism and, second, that the stance adopted by the stand-up artist is not fully analogous to a fictive one (...)
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  7.  76
    Post-abortion syndrome: Creating an affliction.E. M. Dadlez & William L. Andrews - 2009 - Bioethics 24 (9):445-452.
    The contention that abortion harms women constitutes a new strategy employed by the pro-life movement to supplement arguments about fetal rights. David C. Reardon is a prominent promoter of this strategy. Post-abortion syndrome purports to establish that abortion psychologically harms women and, indeed, can harm persons associated with women who have abortions. Thus, harms that abortion is alleged to produce are multiplied. Claims of repression are employed to complicate efforts to disprove the existence of psychological harm and causal antecedents of (...)
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  8. Literature, Ethical Thought Experiments, and Moral Knowledge.E. M. Dadlez - 2013 - Southwest Philosophy Review 29 (1):195-209.
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  9.  55
    Hume, Halos, and Rough Heroes: Moral and Aesthetic Defects in Works of Fiction.E. M. Dadlez - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):91-102.
    The starting point of this paper is a recent exchange in the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism1 that pits moderate moralism against robust immoralism and has Humean antecedents. I will proceed by agreeing in part with both, but fully with neither, thereby annoying as many people as possible in one go. I believe, with Anne Eaton, the proponent of robust immoralism, that fictions which valorize what she calls "rough heroes" can arouse both aesthetically compelling and morally troubling reactions. On (...)
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  10. Rape, evolution, and pseudoscience: Natural selection in the academy.E. M. Dadlez, William L. Andrews, Courtney Lewis & Marissa Stroud - 2009 - Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (1):75-96.
  11.  50
    Post‐Abortion Syndrome: Creating an Affliction.E. M. Dadlez & William L. Andrews - 2009 - Bioethics 24 (9):445 - 452.
    The contention that abortion harms women constitutes a new strategy employed by the pro-life movement to supplement arguments about fetal rights. David C. Reardon is a prominent promoter of this strategy. Post-abortion syndrome purports to establish that abortion psychologically harms women and, indeed, can harm persons associated with women who have abortions. Thus, harms that abortion is alleged to produce are multiplied. Claims of repression are employed to complicate efforts to disprove the existence of psychological harm and causal antecedents of (...)
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  12.  15
    Rights of Passage: The Ethics of Disability Passing and Repercussions for Identity.Sarah H. Woolwine & E. M. Dadlez - 2016 - Res Philosophica 93 (4):951-969.
    This article responds to two ethical conundrums associated with the practice of disability passing. One of these problems is the question of whether or not passing as abled is morally wrong in that it constitutes deception. The other, related difficulty arises from the tendency of the able-bodied in contemporary society to reinforce the activity of passing despite its frequent condemnation as a form of pretense or fraud. We draw upon recent scholarship on transgender and disability passing to criticize and explore (...)
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  13.  38
    Fictional Objects, Future Objectives: Why Existence Matters Less Than You Think.E. M. Dadlez & C. M. Haramia - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1A):1-15.
    Beatrice. Jane Tennison. Elizabeth Bennett. Arya Stark. Katniss Everdeen. None of them is real. All of them appear not only to engage our interest but also to move us. Some of them might even be thought to affect us further—to inspire us to do things, or at least to regard things in a different light. The set of problems typically grouped under the designation “paradox of fiction” raises questions about an apparent contradiction, about our responding emotionally to entities and events (...)
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  14.  89
    Ink, Art and Expression: Philosophical Questions about Tattoos.E. M. Dadlez - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (11):739-753.
    This essay offers an overview of the reasons why tattoos are philosophically interesting. Considered here will be a partial survey of potential areas of philosophical interest with respect to tattoos, fortified by a little historical context. Claims about the ethical significance of tattoos and about the significance of tattoos for self-expression and as expressions of identity will be canvassed in the first two sections, as will questions about what they express or signify, how they might do so, and whose expression (...)
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  15.  29
    Knowing Setter.E. M. Dadlez - 2005 - Southwest Philosophy Review 21 (1):35-44.
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  16.  48
    Index to Volume 45.Dina Zoe Belluigi, Michael Belshaw, Michael Benton, Deborah Bradley, Bert Cardullo, Janine Certo, Wayne Brinda, Leslie Cunliffe, E. M. Dadlez & Rhett Diessner - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (4).
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  17.  3
    Aesthetics and Humean Aesthetic Norms in the Novels of Jane Austen.E. M. Dadlez - 2009-04-17 - In Dominic McIver Lopes & Berys Gaut (eds.), Mirrors to One Another. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 114–134.
    This chapter contains sections titled: I II.
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  18.  16
    A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature edited by hagberg, garry l. and walter jost.E. M. Dadlez - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):237-239.
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  19.  12
    Cakes as Speech and Cakes as Art in Colorado.E. M. Dadlez - 2018 - The Philosophers' Magazine 83:9-10.
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  20.  15
    Comment on James Rocha, “Forced to Listen to the Heart”.E. M. Dadlez - 2014 - Southwest Philosophy Review 30 (2):51-54.
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  21.  4
    Comment on Kenneth Brewer’s “Fashion and the Judgment of Taste”.E. M. Dadlez - 2019 - Southwest Philosophy Review 35 (2):23-26.
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  22.  30
    Comment on “Still in Hot Water” by Duncan Purves.E. M. Dadlez - 2011 - Southwest Philosophy Review 27 (2):57-61.
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  23.  16
    Comment on “Solving the Puzzle of Aesthetic Assertion” by Andrew Morgan.E. M. Dadlez - 2017 - Southwest Philosophy Review 33 (2):39-42.
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  24.  54
    Form Affects Content: Reading Jane Austen.E. M. Dadlez - 2008 - Philosophy and Literature 32 (2):315-329.
    What does it mean to hold that the significant aspects of a literary passage cannot be captured in a paraphrase? Does a change in the description of an act "risk producing a different act" from the one described? Using Jane Austen as an example, we'll consider whether her use of metaphor and symbol really amounts to calling someone a prick, whether her narrative voice changes what it is that is expressed, and whether comedy can hold just as much significance as (...)
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  25.  39
    Fetal Pain Legislation and the Abortion Debate Presidential Address.E. M. Dadlez - 2012 - Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (1):1-13.
  26.  7
    Game of Thrones.E. M. Dadlez - 2019 - The Philosophers' Magazine 86:111-112.
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  27.  4
    Hume and Austen on Pleasure, Sentiment, and Virtue.E. M. Dadlez - 2009-04-17 - In Dominic McIver Lopes & Berys Gaut (eds.), Mirrors to One Another. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 58–75.
  28.  5
    Hume and Austen on Sympathy.E. M. Dadlez - 2009-04-17 - In Dominic McIver Lopes & Berys Gaut (eds.), Mirrors to One Another. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 76–87.
  29.  5
    Hume and Austen on Good People and Good Reasoning.E. M. Dadlez - 2009-04-17 - In Dominic McIver Lopes & Berys Gaut (eds.), Mirrors to One Another. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 135–156.
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  30.  6
    Hume and Austen on Pride.E. M. Dadlez - 2009-04-17 - In Dominic McIver Lopes & Berys Gaut (eds.), Mirrors to One Another. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 168–180.
  31.  8
    Hume and Austen on Jealousy, Envy, Malice, and the Principle of Comparison.E. M. Dadlez - 2009-04-17 - In Dominic McIver Lopes & Berys Gaut (eds.), Mirrors to One Another. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 181–194.
  32.  4
    Hume's General Point of View and the Novels of Jane Austen.E. M. Dadlez - 2009-04-17 - In Dominic McIver Lopes & Berys Gaut (eds.), Mirrors to One Another. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 88–99.
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  33.  6
    How Literature Can be a Thought Experiment: Alternatives to and Elaborations of Original Accounts.E. M. Dadlez - 2009-04-17 - In Dominic McIver Lopes & Berys Gaut (eds.), Mirrors to One Another. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 1–19.
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  34.  4
    Indolence and Industry in Hume and Austen.E. M. Dadlez - 2009-04-17 - In Dominic McIver Lopes & Berys Gaut (eds.), Mirrors to One Another. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 195–205.
  35. Index.E. M. Dadlez - 2009-04-17 - In Dominic McIver Lopes & Berys Gaut (eds.), Mirrors to One Another. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 229–234.
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  36.  2
    Kantian and Aristotelian Accounts of Austen.E. M. Dadlez - 2009-04-17 - In Dominic McIver Lopes & Berys Gaut (eds.), Mirrors to One Another. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 37–57.
    This chapter contains sections titled: I II.
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  37.  51
    Kitsch and Bullshit as Cases of Aesthetic and Epistemic Transgression.E. M. Dadlez - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):59-67.
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  38.  13
    Knowing Setter.E. M. Dadlez - 2005 - Southwest Philosophy Review 21 (1):35-44.
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  39.  3
    Literary Form and Philosophical Content.E. M. Dadlez - 2009-04-17 - In Dominic McIver Lopes & Berys Gaut (eds.), Mirrors to One Another. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 20–36.
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  40.  6
    “Lovers,” “Friends,“ and other Endearing Appellations: Marriage in Hume and Austen.E. M. Dadlez - 2009-04-17 - In Dominic McIver Lopes & Berys Gaut (eds.), Mirrors to One Another. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 157–167.
  41.  16
    Legislating Pain Capability: Sentience and the Abortion Debate.E. M. Dadlez & William L. Andrews - 2018 - In David Boonin, Katrina L. Sifferd, Tyler K. Fagan, Valerie Gray Hardcastle, Michael Huemer, Daniel Wodak, Derk Pereboom, Stephen J. Morse, Sarah Tyson, Mark Zelcer, Garrett VanPelt, Devin Casey, Philip E. Devine, David K. Chan, Maarten Boudry, Christopher Freiman, Hrishikesh Joshi, Shelley Wilcox, Jason Brennan, Eric Wiland, Ryan Muldoon, Mark Alfano, Philip Robichaud, Kevin Timpe, David Livingstone Smith, Francis J. Beckwith, Dan Hooley, Russell Blackford, John Corvino, Corey McCall, Dan Demetriou, Ajume Wingo, Michael Shermer, Ole Martin Moen, Aksel Braanen Sterri, Teresa Blankmeyer Burke, Jeppe von Platz, John Thrasher, Mary Hawkesworth, William MacAskill, Daniel Halliday, Janine O’Flynn, Yoaav Isaacs, Jason Iuliano, Claire Pickard, Arvin M. Gouw, Tina Rulli, Justin Caouette, Allen Habib, Brian D. Earp, Andrew Vierra, Subrena E. Smith, Danielle M. Wenner, Lisa Diependaele, Sigrid Sterckx, G. Owen Schaefer, Markus K. Labude, Harisan Unais Nasir, Udo Schuklenk, Benjamin Zolf & Woolwine (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy. Springer Verlag. pp. 661-675.
    Over the past few years, over a dozen states have proposed, and almost as many have passed, something referred to as the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, a piece of legislation that makes abortion impermissible once fetal pain is possible and that further stipulates the fetus can feel pain at or before 20 weeks of gestation. Some very important questions immediately relevant to the abortion debate, perhaps even to the more complex issue of fetal rights, are raised by this legislation, (...)
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  42.  2
    Leveraging Respect from a Pro-Choice Perspective.E. M. Dadlez - 2023 - Southwest Philosophy Review 39 (2):43-47.
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  43.  3
    Metaphor and Misconstrual.E. M. Dadlez - 2021 - Southwest Philosophy Review 37 (2):21-24.
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  44.  69
    Mirrors to One Another: Emotion and Value in Jane Austen and David Hume.E. M. Dadlez - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    A compelling exploration of the convergence of Jane Austen’s literary themes and characters with David Hume’s views on morality and human nature. Argues that the normative perspectives endorsed in Jane Austen's novels are best characterized in terms of a Humean approach, and that the merits of Hume's account of ethical, aesthetic and epistemic virtue are vividly illustrated by Austen's writing. Illustrates how Hume and Austen complement one another, each providing a lens that allows us to expand and elaborate on the (...)
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  45.  94
    Not Moderately Moral: Why Hume Is Not a "Moderate Moralist".E. M. Dadlez & Jeanette Bicknell - 2013 - Philosophy and Literature 37 (2):330-342.
    If philosophers held popularity contests, David Hume would be a perennial winner. Witty, a bon vivant, and champion of reason over bigotry and superstition, it is not surprising that many contemporary thinkers want to recruit him as an ally or claim his views as precursors to their own. In the debate over the moral content of artworks and its possible relevance for artistic and aesthetic value, the group whose views are known variously as “ethicism,” “moralism,” or “moderate moralism” has claimed (...)
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  46.  18
    Only Kidding.E. M. Dadlez - 2006 - Southwest Philosophy Review 22 (2):1-16.
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  47.  8
    Only Kidding.E. M. Dadlez - 2006 - Southwest Philosophy Review 22 (2):1-16.
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  48.  27
    Of Two Minds.E. M. Dadlez - 2002 - Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (1):185-192.
  49.  5
    Of Two Minds.E. M. Dadlez - 2002 - Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (1):185-192.
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  50.  35
    Pleased and Afflicted: Hume on the Paradox of Tragic Pleasure.E. M. Dadlez - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (2):213-236.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Hume Studies Volume 30, Number 2, November 2004, pp. 213-236 Pleased and Afflicted: Hume on the Paradox of Tragic Pleasure E. M. DADLEZ How fast can you run? As fast as a leopard. How fast are you going to run? A whistle sounds the order that sends Archie Hamilton and his comrades over the top of the trench to certain death. Racing to circumvent that order and arriving seconds (...)
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