Results for 'E. Dickins Thomas'

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  1.  9
    Data and Context.Thomas E. Dickins - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):633-642.
    Deacon presents a fascinating model that adds to explanations of the origins of life from physical matter. Deacon’s paper owes much to the work of Howard Pattee, who saw semiotic relations in informational terms, and Deacon binds his model to criticism of current information concepts in biology which he sees as semantically inadequate. In this commentary I first outline the broader project from Pattee, and then I present a cybernetic perspective on information. My claim is that this view of information (...)
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  2.  53
    The phylogeny and ontogeny of adaptations.E. Dickins Thomas - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):283-284.
    Locke & Bogin (L&B) rightly point to the absence of ontogeny in theories of language evolution. However, they overly rely upon ontogenetic data to isolate components of the language faculty. Only an adaptationist analysis, of the sort seen in evolutionary psychology, can carve language at its joints and lead to testable predictions about how language works.
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  3. Social constructionism as cognitive science.Thomas E. Dickins - 2004 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 34 (4):333–352.
    Social constructionism is a broad position that emphasizes the importance of human social processes in psychology. These processes are generally associated with language and the ability to construct stories that conform to the emergent rules of "language games". This view allows one to espouse a variety of critical postures with regard to realist commitments within the social and behavioural sciences, ranging from outright relativism to a more moderate respect for the "barrier" that linguistic descriptions can place between us and reality. (...)
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  4.  68
    Can there ever be a non-specific adaptation? A response to Simon J. Hampton.Thomas E. Dickins - 2005 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 35 (3):329–340.
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  5.  60
    Designed calibration: Naturally selected flexibility, not non-genetic inheritance.Thomas E. Dickins & Benjamin J. A. Dickins - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (4):368-369.
    Jablonka & Lamb (J&L) have presented a number of different possible mechanisms for finessing design. The extra-genetic nature of these mechanisms has led them to challenge orthodox neo-Darwinian views. However, these mechanisms are for calibration and have been designed by natural selection. As such, they add detail to our knowledge, but neo-Darwinism is sufficiently resourced to account for them.
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  6.  71
    Is empirical imagination a constraint on adaptationist theory construction?Thomas E. Dickins & David W. Dickins - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):515-516.
    Andrews et al. present a form of instrumental adaptationism that is designed to test the hypothesis that a given trait is an adaptation. This epistemological commitment aims to make clear statements about behavioural natural kinds. The instrumental logic is sound, but it is the limits of our empirical imagination that can cause problems for theory construction.
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  7.  5
    Lessons from behaviorism: The problem of construct-led science.Thomas E. Dickins & Qazi Rahman - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45.
    Yarkoni makes a number of valid points in his critical analysis of psychology, but he misses an opportunity to expose the root of its problems. That root is the poor practice around the derivation of explanatory constructs. We make comment on this with an example from behaviorist history and relate this to the recent discussion of scientific understanding in the philosophy of science.
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  8.  75
    On sociosexual cognitive architecture.Thomas E. Dickins - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):280-281.
    Schmitt has equivocated about the underlying psychology of sociosexuality, but from the data presented in the target article, it would appear that he has drawn out the underlying cognitive architecture. In this commentary, I describe this architecture and discuss two emerging hypotheses about heterosexual and homosexual male sociosexuality.
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  9.  16
    Possible phylogenies: The role of hypotheses, weak inferences, and falsification.Thomas E. Dickins - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):219-220.
    This commentary takes issue with Corballis's claim to have presented a falsifiable hypothesis. It argues that Corballis has instead presented a framework of weak inferences that, although unfalsifiable, might help to constrain future theory-building.
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  10.  8
    The Role of Information in Evolutionary Biology.Thomas E. Dickins - 2023 - Acta Biotheoretica 71 (3).
    The Modern Synthesis has received criticism for its purported gene-centrism. That criticism relies on a concept of the gene as a unit of instructional information. In this paper I discuss information concepts and endorse one, developed from Floridi, that sees information as a functional relationship between data and context. I use this concept to inspect developmental criticisms of the Modern Synthesis and argue that the instructional gene arose as an idealization practice when evolutionary biologists made comment on development. However, a (...)
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  11.  13
    Evolutionary accounts of human behavioural diversity introduction.Gillian R. Brown, Thomas E. Dickins, Rebecca Sear & Kevin N. Laland - 2011 - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 366 (156):313-324.
    Human beings persist in an extraordinary range of ecological settings, in the process exhibiting enormous behavioural diversity, both within and between populations. People vary in their social, mating and parental behaviour and have diverse and elaborate beliefs, traditions, norms and institutions. The aim of this theme issue is to ask whether, and how, evolutionary theory can help us to understand this diversity. In this introductory article, we provide a background to the debate surrounding how best to understand behavioural diversity using (...)
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  12.  24
    Suicide terrorism and post-mortem benefits.Jacqueline M. Gray & Thomas E. Dickins - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (4):369-370.
  13.  8
    Measuring heritability: Why bother?David M. Shuker & Thomas E. Dickins - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45:e175.
    Uchiyama et al. rightly consider how cultural variation may influence estimates of heritability by contributing to environmental sources of variation. We disagree, however, with the idea that generalisable estimates of heritability are ever a plausible aim. Heritability estimates are always context-specific, and to suggest otherwise is to misunderstand what heritability can and cannot tell us.
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  14.  2
    A not-so proximate account of cleansing behavior.Jonathan Sigger & Thomas E. Dickins - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44:e24.
    In this commentary we outline perceptual control theory and suggest this as a fruitful way for Lee and Schwarz (L&S) to fully embody their account of cleansing behavior. Moreover, we take issue with the command control approach that L&S have taken seeing this as an unnecessary cognitive commitment within an embodied model of cleansing behavior.
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  15.  11
    Group-level traits can be studied with standard evolutionary theory.Thomas C. Scott-Phillips & Thomas E. Dickins - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (3):273-274.
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  16.  47
    The generation game is the cooperation game: The role of grandparents in the timing of reproduction.Rebecca Sear & Thomas E. Dickins - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):34-35.
    Coall & Hertwig (C&H) demonstrate the importance of grandparents to children, even in low fertility societies. We suggest policy-makers interested in reproductive timing in such contexts should be alerted to the practical applications of this cooperative breeding framework. The presence or absence of a supportive kin network could help explain why some women begin their reproductive careers or.
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  17.  67
    The niche construction perspective: a critical appraisal.Thomas C. Scott-Phillips, Kevin N. Laland, David M. Shuker, Thomas E. Dickins & Stuart A. West - unknown
    Niche construction refers to the activities of organisms that bring about changes in their environments, many of which are evolutionarily and ecologically consequential. Advocates of niche construction theory (NCT) believe that standard evolutionary theory fails to recognize the full importance of niche construction, and consequently propose a novel view of evolution, in which niche construction and its legacy over time (ecological inheritance) are described as evolutionary processes, equivalent in importance to natural selection. Here, we subject NCT to critical evaluation, in (...)
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  18.  26
    General intelligence does not help us understand cognitive evolution.David M. Shuker, Louise Barrett, Thomas E. Dickins, Thom C. Scott-Phillips & Robert A. Barton - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  19.  35
    Synthesis in the human evolutionary behavioural sciences.Rebecca Sear, David W. Lawson & Thomas E. Dickins - unknown
    Over the last three decades, the application of evolutionary theory to the human sciences has shown remarkable growth. This growth has also been characterised by a ‘splitting’ process, with the emergence of distinct sub-disciplines, most notably: Human Behavioural Ecology (HBE), Evolutionary Psychology (EP) and studies of Cultural Evolution (CE). Multiple applications of evolutionary ideas to the human sciences are undoubtedly a good thing, demonstrating the usefulness of this approach to human affairs. Nevertheless, this fracture has been associated with considerable tension, (...)
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  20.  82
    Two more things for consideration: Sexual orientation and conduct disorder.Thomas Edmund Dickins & Mark James Timothy Sergeant - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):275-275.
    We add to Archer's review with mention of sexual orientation differences in aggression and empathy, which suggest a biological basis for the mediating role of empathy. We also note that Archer's view of sex differences will illuminate discussion of conduct disorder, which can only be of help to researchers in this field.
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  21. ch. 7. Machiavelli's Prince : an Americanist perspective.Thomas E. Cronin - 2016 - In Timothy Fuller (ed.), Machiavelli's legacy: The Prince after five hundred years. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.
     
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  22. From the parti devot to the parti du roi: royalist ideology, foreign policy, and the recrystallization of court faction at the accession of Louis XVI.Thomas E. Kaiser - 2019 - In Mita Choudhury, Daniel J. Watkins & Dale K. Van Kley (eds.), Belief and politics in Enlightenment France: essays in honor of Dale K. Van Kley. [Liverpool, UK]: Liverpool University Press.
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  23.  36
    Human Welfare and Moral Worth: Kantian Perspectives.Thomas E. Hill - 2002 - Oxford, GB: Clarendon Press.
    Thomas Hill, a leading figure in the recent development of Kantian moral philosophy, presents a set of essays exploring the implications of basic Kantian ideas for practical issues. The first part of the book provides background in central themes in Kant's ethics; the second part discusses questions regarding human welfare; the third focuses on moral worth -- the nature and grounds of moral assessment of persons as deserving esteem or blame. Hill shows moral, political, and social philosophers just how (...)
  24. Humanity as an End in Itself.Thomas E. Hill - 1980 - Ethics 91 (1):84 - 99.
  25.  14
    Thinking on Screen: Film as Philosophy.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2007 - Routledge.
    Thinking on Screen: Film as Philosophy is an accessible and thought-provoking examination of the way films raise and explore complex philosophical ideas. Written in a clear and engaging style, Thomas Wartenberg examines films' ability to discuss, and even criticize ideas that have intrigued and puzzled philosophers over the centuries such as the nature of personhood, the basis of morality, and epistemological skepticism. Beginning with a demonstration of how specific forms of philosophical discourse are presented cinematically, Wartenberg moves on to (...)
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  26.  20
    Introduction.Ward E. Jones & Thomas Martin - 2004 - Philosophical Papers 33 (3):243-250.
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  27.  29
    Existentialism: A Beginner's Guide.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2008 - Oneworld.
    A lively introduction to this celebrated philosophical tradition. -/- Existentialism pervades modern culture, yet if you ask most people what it means, they won’t be able to tell you. In this lively and topical introduction, Wartenberg reveals a vibrant mode of philosophical inquiry that addresses concerns at the heart of the existence of every human being. Wartenberg uses classic films, novels, and plays to present the ideas of now-legendary Existentialist thinkers from Nietzsche and Camus to Sartre and Heidegger and to (...)
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  28.  4
    Learning Environmental Contexts in a Goal-Seeking Neural Network.Thomas E. Portegys - 2007 - Journal of Intelligent Systems 16 (2):117-134.
  29.  91
    The Forms of Power: From Domination to Transformation.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 1990 - Philadelphia, PA, USA: Temple University Press.
    Examining the ways in which philosophers from Plato onwards have used the concept of power, this work develops a field theory of power that rejects many of the reigning assumptions made about power. Incorporating the insights of feminist theorists, it argues that power has a positive as well as a negative role to play in social relations.
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  30. Autonomy and Self Respect.Thomas E. Hill - 1992 - Philosophy 67 (262):561-563.
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  31. Happiness and Human Flourishing in Kant's Ethics: THOMAS E. HILL, JR.Thomas E. Hill - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (1):143-175.
    Ancient moral philosophers, especially Aristotle and his followers, typically shared the assumption that ethics is primarily concerned with how to achieve the final end for human beings, a life of “happiness” or “human flourishing.” This final end was not a subjective condition, such as contentment or the satisfaction of our preferences, but a life that could be objectively determined to be appropriate to our nature as human beings. Character traits were treated as moral virtues because they contributed well toward this (...)
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  32. The Message of Affirmative Action.Thomas E. Hill - 1991 - Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (2):108-129.
    Affirmative action programs remain controversial, I suspect, partly because the familiar arguments for and against them start from significantly different moral perspectives. Thus I want to step back for a while from the details of debate about particular programs and give attention to the moral viewpoints presupposed in differenttypesof argument. My aim, more specifically, is to compare the “messages” expressed when affirmative action is defended from different moral perspectives. Exclusively forward-looking (for example, utilitarian) arguments, I suggest, tend to express the (...)
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  33. Overcoming Logical Positivism from within. The Emergence of Neurath's Naturalism in the Vienna Circle's Protocol Sentence Debate.Thomas E. Uebel - 1995 - Erkenntnis 43 (3):401-404.
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  34.  3
    The personal universe: essays in honor of John Macmurray.Thomas E. Wren (ed.) - 1975 - Atlantic Highlands, N.J.: Humanities Press.
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  35.  74
    The Social Construction of Technological Systems: New Directions in Sociology and History of Technology (25th Anniversary Edition with new preface).Wiebe E. Bijker, Thomas P. Hughes & Trevor Pinch (eds.) - 1987 - MIT Press.
  36.  71
    A Kantian Perspective on Moral Rules.Thomas E. Hill - 1992 - Philosophical Perspectives 6:285-304.
  37.  85
    Moral Construction as a Task: Sources and Limits.Thomas E. Hill - 2008 - Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (1):214-236.
    This essay first distinguishes different questions regarding moral objectivity and relativism and then sketches a broadly Kantian position on two of these questions. First, how, if at all, can we derive, justify, or support specific moral principles and judgments from more basic moral standards and values? Second, how, if at all, can the basic standards such as my broadly Kantian perspective, be defended? Regarding the first question, the broadly Kantian position is that from ideas in Kant's later formulations of the (...)
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  38. Hypothetical Consent in Kantian Constructivism.Thomas E. Hill - 2001 - Social Philosophy and Policy 18 (2):300-329.
    Epistemology, as I understand it, is a branch of philosophy especially concerned with general questions about how we can know various things or at least justify our beliefs about them. It questions what counts as evidence and what are reasonable sources of doubt. Traditionally, episte-mology focuses on pervasive and apparently basic assumptions covering a wide range of claims to knowledge or justified belief rather than very specific, practical puzzles. For example, traditional epistemologists ask “How do we know there are material (...)
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  39.  43
    Reasonable Self-Interest*: THOMAS E. HILL, JR.Thomas E. Hill - 1997 - Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (1):52-85.
    Philosophers have debated for millennia about whether moral requirements are always rational to follow. The background for these debates is often what I shall call “the self-interest model.” The guiding assumption here is that the basic demand of reason, to each person, is that one must, above all, advance one's self-interest. Alternatively, debate may be framed by a related, but significantly different, assumption: the idea that the basic rational requirement is to develop and pursue a set of personal ends in (...)
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  40.  16
    Human Welfare and Moral Worth: Kantian Perspectives.Thomas E. Hill - 2003 - Philosophical Quarterly 53 (213):587-595.
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  41. Kantian Normative Ethics.Thomas E. Hill, Jr & Chapel Hill - 2007 - In David Copp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory. Oup Usa.
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  42. Punishment, Conscience, and Moral Worth.Thomas E. Hill & Jr - 2002 - In Mark Timmons (ed.), Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: Interpretative Essays. Clarendon Press.
     
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  43.  25
    Romantic Love and the Feudal Household: Romeo and Juliet as Social Criticism.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2023 - Philosophy and Literature 46 (2):447-467.
    Abstract:Romeo and Juliet is one of the first works to emphasize the important place that romantic love holds in the lives of two individuals. Less frequently acknowledged is the role of romantic love in the play's criticism of feudal society. Using the notion of an unlikely couple, I explore the play's critique of feudal society for allowing the antagonism between the two lovers' noble households to undermine the possibility of their finding true love. The play argues for the importance of (...)
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  44.  6
    Kant's Argument for the Rationality of Moral Conduct.Thomas E. Hill - 1985 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 66 (1-2):3-23.
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  45. Symbolic Protest and Calculated Silence.Thomas E. Hill - 1979 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 9 (1):83-102.
     
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  46.  10
    The Third Natural Law Institute.Thomas E. Davitt - 1950 - Modern Schoolman 27 (4):314-315.
  47.  6
    Order through Reason. Kant’s Transcendental Justification of Science.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 1979 - Kant Studien 70 (1-4):409-424.
  48. Unlikely Couples: Movie Romance as Social Criticism.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2001 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (1):110-111.
     
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  49.  58
    Beneficence and Self-Love: A Kantian Perspective*: THOMAS E. HILL, JR.Thomas E. Hill - 1993 - Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (1):1-23.
    What, if anything, are we morally required to do on behalf of others besides respecting their rights? And why is such regard for others a reasonable moral requirement? These two questions have long been major concerns of ethical theory, but the answers that philosophers give tend to vary with their beliefs about human nature. More specifically, their answers typically depend on the position they take on a third-question: To what extent, if any, is it possible for us to act altruistically?
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  50.  13
    Mel Bochner: Illustrating Philosophy.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2015 - Mount Holyoke College Art.
    What would a visual image of a philosophical idea look like? Aren't philosophical concepts, by virtue of their very abstractness, incapable of being rendered visually? These are some of the questions raised in this catalogue of an exhibition at the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum, Mel Bochner: Illustrating Philosophy, which examines a specific project by the renowned conceptual artist. Curator and author Thomas E. Wartenberg explores Bochner's prints and drawings inspired by the writings of philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein, a suite (...)
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