13 found
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  1.  21
    Demonstrating ‘respect for persons’ in clinical research: findings from qualitative interviews with diverse genomics research participants.Stephanie A. Kraft, Erin Rothwell, Seema K. Shah, Devan M. Duenas, Hannah Lewis, Kristin Muessig, Douglas J. Opel, Katrina A. B. Goddard & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):e8-e8.
    The ethical principle of ‘respect for persons’ in clinical research has traditionally focused on protecting individuals’ autonomy rights, but respect for participants also includes broader, although less well understood, ethical obligations to regard individuals’ rights, needs, interests and feelings. However, there is little empirical evidence about how to effectively convey respect to potential and current participants. To fill this gap, we conducted exploratory, qualitative interviews with participants in a clinical genomics implementation study. We interviewed 40 participants in English or Spanish (...)
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  2.  48
    Nudge or Grudge? Choice Architecture and Parental Decision‐Making.Jennifer Blumenthal-Barby & Douglas J. Opel - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (2):33-39.
    Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein define a nudge as “any aspect of the choice architecture that alters people's behavior in a predictable way without forbidding any options or significantly changing their economic incentives.” Much has been written about the ethics of nudging competent adult patients. Less has been written about the ethics of nudging surrogates’ decision‐making and how the ethical considerations and arguments in that context might differ. Even less has been written about nudging surrogate decision‐making in the context of (...)
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  3.  8
    Integrating Ethics and Patient Safety: The Role of Clinical Ethics Consultants in Quality Improvement.Robert A. Pearlman, Benjamin S. Wilfond, Douglas S. Diekema, Dena Brownstein & Douglas J. Opel - 2009 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 20 (3):221-227.
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  4.  35
    Cosmetic Surgery in Children with Cognitive Disabilities: Who Benefits? Who Decides?Douglas J. Opel & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2009 - Hastings Center Report 39 (1):19-21.
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  5.  20
    Integrating Ethics and Patient Safety: The Role of Clinical Ethics in Quality Improvment (vol 20, pg 220, 2009).Douglas J. Opel, Dena Brownstein, Douglas S. Diekema, Benjamin S. Wilfond & Robert A. Pearlman - 2009 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 20 (4):370-370.
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  6.  26
    The Church, the State, and Vaccine Policy.Saad B. Omer, Douglas J. Opel, Tyler Tate & Robert A. Bednarczyk - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (4):50-52.
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  7.  15
    Frequency of Perceived Conflict between Families and Clinicians at Time of Clinical Ethics Consultation in Hospitalized Children.Aleksandra E. Olszewski, Chuan Zhou, Jiana Ugale, Jessica Ramos, Arika Patneaude & Douglas J. Opel - 2024 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 15 (1):60-65.
    As a well-established service offered at many hospitals internationally, clinical ethics consultation (CEC) is increasingly recognized as a tool to improve patient care quality (Fox et al. 2022; Ta...
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  8.  22
    The Case of A.R.: The Ethics of Sibling Donor Bone Marrow Transplantation Revisited.Douglas J. Opel & Douglas S. Diekema - 2006 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (3):207-219.
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  9.  14
    A Quality of Life Quandary: A Framework for Navigating Parental Refusal of Treatment for Co-Morbidities in Infants with Underlying Medical Conditions.Douglas J. Opel, Douglas S. Diekema, Ryan M. McAdams & Sarah N. Kunz - 2015 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 26 (1):16-23.
    Parental refusal of a recommended treatment is not an uncommon scenario in the neonatal intensive care unit. These refusals may be based upon the parents’ perceptions of their child’s projected quality of life. The inherent subjectivity of quality of life assessments, however, can exacerbate disagreement between parents and healthcare providers. We present a case of parental refusal of surgical intervention for necrotizing enterocolitis in an infant with Bartter syndrome and develop an ethical framework in which to consider the appropriateness of (...)
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  10. A Stepwise Framework for Shared-Decision Making.Kimberly E. Sawyer & Douglas J. Opel - 2021 - In John D. Lantos (ed.), The ethics of shared decision making. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
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  11.  4
    Case study. Denial. Commentary.Douglas J. Opel - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (6):11.
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  12.  10
    Physician, Patient, Parent: Where Exactly Is the Line?Douglas J. Opel - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 42 (6):14-18.
    I have Crohn's disease. This essay is about how my experiences with this disease have shaped my perceptions of boundaries in medicine, particularly around the issue of self‐disclosure. I became a pediatrician first, then a parent, and now a patient, and with each new role, I have become increasingly confused on where boundaries regarding self‐disclosures in medicine lie. I'd like to make the case for more of a reframing and a blurring of personal and professional boundaries regarding physicians’ disclosures about (...)
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  13.  6
    Vaccine Confidence and the Importance of an Interdisciplinary Approach.Douglas J. Opel & Heidi J. Larson - 2021 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 49 (4):596-598.
    Parental confidence in vaccines is waning. To sustain and improve childhood vaccine coverage rates, insights from multiple disciplines are needed to understand and address the socio-cultural factors contributing to decreased vaccine confidence and uptake.
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