11 found
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  1.  27
    Respecting Disability Rights — Toward Improved Crisis Standards of Care.Michelle M. Mello, Govind Persad & Douglas B. White - 2020 - New England Journal of Medicine (5):DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp2011997.
    We propose six guideposts that states and hospitals should follow to respect disability rights when designing policies for the allocation of scarce, lifesaving medical treatments. Four relate to criteria for decisions. First, do not use categorical exclusions, especially ones based on disability or diagnosis. Second, do not use perceived quality of life. Third, use hospital survival and near-term prognosis (e.g., death expected within a few years despite treatment) but not long-term life expectancy. Fourth, when patients who use ventilators in their (...)
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  2.  13
    Eliminating Categorical Exclusion Criteria in Crisis Standards of Care Frameworks.Catherine L. Auriemma, Ashli M. Molinero, Amy J. Houtrow, Govind Persad, Douglas B. White & Scott D. Halpern - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (7):28-36.
    During public health crises including the COVID-19 pandemic, resource scarcity and contagion risks may require health systems to shift—to some degree—from a usual clinical ethic, focused on the wel...
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  3.  22
    Categorized Priority Systems: A New Tool for Fairly Allocating Scarce Medical Resources in the Face of Profound Social Inequities.Tayfun Sönmez, Parag A. Pathak, M. Utku Ünver, Govind Persad, Robert D. Truog & Douglas B. White - 2021 - Chest 153 (3):1294-1299.
    The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has motivated medical ethicists and several task forces to revisit or issue new guidelines on allocating scarce medical resources. Such guidelines are relevant for the allocation of scarce therapeutics and vaccines and for allocation of ICU beds, ventilators, and other life-sustaining treatments or potentially scarce interventions. Principles underlying these guidelines, like saving the most lives, mitigating disparities, reciprocity to those who assume additional risk (eg, essential workers and clinical trial participants), and equal access may (...)
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  4.  39
    Medically Inappropriate or Futile Treatment: Deliberation and Justification.Cheryl J. Misak, Douglas B. White & Robert D. Truog - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (1):90-114.
    This paper reframes the futility debate, moving away from the question “Who decides when to end what is considered to be a medically inappropriate or futile treatment?” and toward the question “How can society make policy that will best account for the multitude of values and conflicts involved in such decision-making?” It offers a pragmatist moral epistemology that provides us with a clear justification of why it is important to take best standards, norms, and physician judgment seriously and a clear (...)
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  5.  16
    Resolving Family-Clinician Disputes in the Context of Contested Definitions of Futility.Gabriel T. Bosslet, Bernard Lo & Douglas B. White - 2018 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 60 (3):314-318.
    We appreciate the opportunity to respond to Schneiderman and colleagues’ opinions on the recent Multiorganization Policy Statement, “An Official ATS/AACN/ACCP/ESICM/SCCM Policy Statement: Responding to Requests for Potentially Inappropriate Treatments in Intensive Care Units”. We will first point out three areas in which Schneiderman and colleagues seem to perceive a disagreement where there is none, then we will respond to their main criticisms of the Multiorganization Policy Statement. In doing so, we will point out areas in which we believe Schneiderman and (...)
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  6.  3
    Medically Inappropriate or Futile Treatment: Deliberation and Justification.Cheryl J. Misak, Douglas B. White & Robert D. Truog - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhv035.
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  7.  34
    A Pilot Study of Neonatologists' Decision-Making Roles in Delivery Room Resuscitation Counseling for Periviable Births.Brownsyne Tucker Edmonds, Fatima McKenzie, Janet E. Panoch, Douglas B. White & Amber E. Barnato - 2016 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 7 (3):175-182.
  8.  33
    Should Pediatric Patients Be Prioritized When Rationing Life-Saving Treatments During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Ryan M. Antiel, Farr A. Curlin, Govind Persad, Douglas B. White, Cathy Zhang, Aaron Glickman, Ezekiel J. Emanuel & John Lantos - 2020 - Pediatrics 146 (3):e2020012542.
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  9.  20
    Surgeons, Intensivists, and Discretion to Refuse Requested Treatments.Mark R. Wicclair & Douglas B. White - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (5):33-42.
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  10.  45
    Do Physicians Disclose Uncertainty When Discussing Prognosis in Grave Critical Illness?Rachel A. Schuster, Seo Yeon Hong, Robert M. Arnold & Douglas B. White - 2012 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 2 (2):125-135.
  11.  3
    Structural Inequities, Fair Opportunity, and the Allocation of Scarce ICU Resources.Douglas B. White & Bernard Lo - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (5):42-47.
    Hastings Center Report, Volume 51, Issue 5, Page 42-47, September‐October 2021.
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