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  1.  19
    Discourses of prejudice in the professions: the case of sign languages.Tom Humphries, Poorna Kushalnagar, Gaurav Mathur, Donna Jo Napoli, Carol Padden, Christian Rathmann & Scott Smith - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (9):648-652.
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  2.  17
    The linguistic sources of offense of taboo terms in German Sign Language.Donna Jo Napoli, Jens-Michael Cramer & Cornelia Loos - 2020 - Cognitive Linguistics 31 (1):73-112.
    Taboo terms offer a playground for linguistic creativity in language after language, and sign languages form no exception. The present paper offers the first investigation of taboo terms in sign languages from a cognitive linguistic perspective. We analyze the linguistic mechanisms that introduce offense, focusing on the combined effects of cognitive metonymy and iconicity. Using the Think Aloud Protocol, we elicited offensive or crass signs and dysphemisms from nine signers. We find that German Sign Language uses a variety of linguistic (...)
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  3.  33
    Infants and Children with Hearing Loss Need Early Language Access.Poorna Kushalnagar, Gaurav Mathur, Christopher J. Moreland, Donna Jo Napoli, Wendy Osterling, Carol Padden & Christian Rathmann - 2010 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (2):140-142.
    Around 96 percent of children with hearing loss are born to parents with intact hearing, who may initially know little about deafness or sign language. Therefore, such parents will need information and support in making decisions about the medical, linguistic, and educational management of their child. Some of these decisions are time-sensitive and irreversible and come at a moment of emotional turmoil and vulnerability (when some parents grieve the loss of a normally hearing child). Clinical research indicates that a deaf (...)
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  4.  14
    Manual Movement in Sign Languages: One Hand Versus Two in Communicating Shapes.Casey Ferrara & Donna Jo Napoli - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (9).
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  5.  32
    The Right to Language.Tom Humphries, Raja Kushalnagar, Gaurav Mathur, Donna Jo Napoli, Carol Padden, Christian Rathmann & Scott Smith - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):872-884.
    We argue for the existence of a state constitutional legal right to language. Our purpose here is to develop a legal framework for protecting the civil rights of the deaf child, with the ultimate goal of calling for legislation that requires all levels of government to fund programs for deaf children and their families to learn a fully accessible language: a sign language. While our discussion regards the United States, the argument we make is based on human rights and the (...)
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  6.  6
    Expanding Echo: Coordinated Head Articulations as Nonmanual Enhancements in Sign Language Phonology.Cornelia Loos & Donna Jo Napoli - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (5):e12958.
    Echo phonology was originally proposed to account for obligatory coordination of manual and mouth articulations observed in several sign languages. However, previous research into the phenomenon lacks clear criteria for which components of movement can or must be copied when the articulators are so different. Nor is there discussion of which nonmanual articulators can echo manual movement. Given the prosodic properties of echoes (coordination of onset/offset and of dynamics such as speed) as well as general motoric coordination of various articulators (...)
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  7.  9
    Correlations Between Handshape and Movement in Sign Languages.Donna Jo Napoli & Casey Ferrara - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (5):e12944.
    Sign language phonological parameters are somewhat analogous to phonemes in spoken language. Unlike phonemes, however, there is little linguistic literature arguing that these parameters interact at the sublexical level. This situation raises the question of whether such interaction in spoken language phonology is an artifact of the modality or whether sign language phonology has not been approached in a way that allows one to recognize sublexical parameter interaction. We present three studies in favor of the latter alternative: a shape‐drawing study (...)
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  8.  30
    Subjects and external arguments clauses and non-clauses.Donna Jo Napoli - 1988 - Linguistics and Philosophy 11 (3):323 - 354.