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Donald Favareau [17]Donald F. Favareau [2]Donald Francis Favareau [1]
  1.  23
    Biosemiotic Questions.Kalevi Kull, Claus Emmeche & Donald Favareau - 2008 - Biosemiotics 1 (1):41-55.
    This paper examines the biosemiotic approach to the study of life processes by fashioning a series of questions that any worthwhile semiotic study of life should ask. These questions can be understood simultaneously as: (1) questions that distinguish a semiotic biology from a non-semiotic (i.e., reductionist–physicalist) one; (2) questions that any student in biosemiotics should ask when doing a case study; and (3) still currently unanswered questions of biosemiotics. In addition, some examples of previously undertaken biosemiotic case studies are examined (...)
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  2.  56
    How Can the Study of the Humanities Inform the Study of Biosemiotics?Donald Favareau, Kalevi Kull, Gerald Ostdiek, Timo Maran, Louise Westling, Paul Cobley, Frederik Stjernfelt, Myrdene Anderson, Morten Tønnessen & Wendy Wheeler - 2017 - Biosemiotics 10 (1):9-31.
    This essay – a collection of contributions from 10 scholars working in the field of biosemiotics and the humanities – considers nature in culture. It frames this by asking the question ‘Why does biosemiotics need the humanities?’. Each author writes from the background of their own disciplinary perspective in order to throw light upon their interdisciplinary engagement with biosemiotics. We start with Donald Favareau, whose originary disciplinary home is ethnomethodology and linguistics, and then move on to Paul Cobley’s contribution on (...)
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  3.  36
    Symbols Are Grounded Not in Things, but in Scaffolded Relations and Their Semiotic Constraints.Donald Favareau - 2015 - Biosemiotics 8 (2):235-255.
    As the accompanying articles in the Special Issue on Semiotic Scaffolding will attest, my colleagues in biosemiotics have done an exemplary job in showing us how to think about the critically generative role that semiotic scaffolding plays “vertically” – i.e., in evolutionary and developmental terms – by “allowing access to the upper floors” of biological complexity, cognition and evolution.In addition to such diachronic considerations of semiotic scaffolding, I wish to offer here a consideration of semiotic scaffolding’s synchronic power, as well (...)
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  4.  17
    The Biosemiotic Glossary Project: Intentionality.Donald Favareau & Arran Gare - 2017 - Biosemiotics 10 (3):413-459.
    In 2014, Morten Tønnessen and the editors of Biosemiotics officially launched the Biosemiotic Glossary Project in the effort to: solidify and detail established terminology being used in the field of Biosemiotics for the benefit of newcomers and outsiders; and to by involving the entire biosemiotics community, to contribute innovatively in the theoretical development of biosemiotic theory and vocabulary via the discussions that result. Biosemiotics, in its concern with explaining the emergence of, and the relations between, both biological ‘end-directedness’ and semiotic (...)
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  5.  32
    The Biosemiotic Turn.Donald Favareau - 2008 - Biosemiotics 1 (1):5-23.
    With the publication of this inaugural issue of the internationally peer-reviewed journal Biosemiotics, our still-developing young interdiscipline marks yet another milestone in its journey towards adulthood. For this occasion, the editors of Biosemiotics have asked me to provide for those readers who may be newcomers to our field a very brief overview of the history of biosemiotics, contextualizing it within and against the larger currents of philosophical and scientific thinking from which it has emerged. To explain the origins of this (...)
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  6.  19
    John Deely, From the Point of View of Biosemiotics.Paul Cobley, Donald Favareau & Kalevi Kull - 2017 - Biosemiotics 10 (1):1-4.
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  7.  3
    Understanding Natural Constructivism.Donald Favareau - 2008 - Semiotica 2008 (172):489-528.
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  8.  3
    Jesper Hoffmeyer 1942–2019.Claus Emmeche, Donald Favareau & Kalevi Kull - 2019 - Biosemiotics 12 (3):365-372.
    This obituary about Jesper Hoffmeyer, thinker, scholar, science communicator, biochemist, biosemiotician, and saxophonist, gives a sketch of his intellectual biography, and provides a bibliography of the books he authored or edited.
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  9.  9
    Jesper Hoffmeyer 1942–2019.Claus Emmeche, Donald Favareau & Kalevi Kull - 2019 - Biosemiotics 12 (3):365-372.
    This obituary about Jesper Hoffmeyer, thinker, scholar, science communicator, biochemist, biosemiotician, and saxophonist, gives a sketch of his intellectual biography, and provides a bibliography of the books he authored or edited.
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  10.  4
    Facing Up to the Hard Problem of Biosemiotics.Donald Favareau - forthcoming - Biosemiotics:1-13.
    Forty-five years ago, while still an undergraduate student at Western Washington University’s Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies, Terrence Deacon produced as his honours thesis a programmatic manifesto for re-situating the semiotic logic of Charles Sanders Peirce “out of the realm of philosophy and [revealing instead] its necessary association with the information sciences and its close parallels with current systems theories”. Deacon’s project, then and now, has been to show how, within the context of naturally occurring physical processes, Peirce’s essential insight (...)
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  11.  51
    Reviews Peirce's Theory of Signs . By T. L. Short. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007, Pp. 374, £48.Donald F. Favareau - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (2):311-315.
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  12.  30
    The IASS Roundtable on Biosemiotics: A Discussion with Some Founders of the Field.Donald Favareau, Claus Emmeche & Jesper Hoff Meyer - 2008 - American Journal of Semiotics 24 (1/3):1-21.
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  13.  23
    The Layperson’s Guide to Teleodynamics: A Review of Jeremy Sherman’s Neither Ghost nor Machine: The Emergence and Nature of Selves. [REVIEW]Donald Favareau - 2020 - Biosemiotics 13 (3):443-452.
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  14.  34
    Teispool oma ja võõrast.Donald Favareau - 2002 - Sign Systems Studies 30 (1):100-100.
    The explosive growth over the last two decades of neuroscience, cognitive science, and “consciousness studies” as generally conceived, remains as yet unaccompanied by a corresponding development in the establishment of an explicitly semiotic understanding of how the relations of sign exchange at the neuronal level function in the larger network of psychologically accessible sign exchange. This article attempts a preliminary foray into the establishment of just such a neurosemiotic. It takes, as its test case and as its point of departure, (...)
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  15. Biosemiotic Research Questions.Kalevi Kull, Claus Emmeche & Donald Favareau - 2011 - In Claus Emmeche (ed.), Towards a Semiotic Biology: Life is the Action of Signs. Imperial College Press. pp. 67--90.
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