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  1.  4
    Ethics Briefing.Sophie Brannan, Martin Davies, Veronica English, Caroline Ann Harrison, Dominic Norcliffe-Brown & Julian C. Sheather - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (8):587-588.
    In June 2021, the BMA published its report on moral distress and moral injury in UK doctors.1 The report includes definitions of the terms ‘moral distress’ and ‘moral injury’ as well as a summary of how the concepts have developed over time. There is also an analysis of the BMA’s pan-profession survey of moral distress and moral injury of doctors in the UK, the first of its kind. The impact of COVID-19 and recommendations for tackling moral distress also feature. Many (...)
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  2.  5
    Ethics Briefing.Dominic Norcliffe-Brown, Sophie Brannan, Martin Davies, Veronica English, Rebecca Mussell & Julian C. Sheather - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (2):129-130.
    On 8 October 2020, the British Medical Association published the results of its survey of BMA members on physician-assisted dying. With 28 986 respondents, this was one of the largest surveys of medical opinion on this topic ever carried out. This represents 19.35% of those who received an invitation to participate and the respondents were broadly representative of the BMA’s overall membership. The BMA was clear throughout this process that the results of the survey would not determine its policy. Its (...)
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  3.  1
    Ethics Briefing.Dominic Norcliffe-Brown, Sophie Brannan, Martin Davies, Veronica English, Rebecca Mussell & Julian C. Sheather - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (6):441-442.
    During the first UK wave of the pandemic, there were two areas of immediate ethical concern for the medical profession. The first was the possibility that life-saving resources could be overwhelmed. Early reports from hospitals in the Italian city of Bergamo suggested that ventilatory support might need rationing and emergency ‘battlefield’ triage was a real possibility.1 In the UK, several professional bodies, including the British Medical Association and the Royal College of Physicians rapidly developed guidance for doctors should triage become (...)
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  4.  6
    Ethics Briefing.Dominic Norcliffe-Brown, Sophie Brannan, Martin Davies, Veronica English, Caroline Ann Harrison & Julian C. Sheather - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (4):285-286.
    In parts of the world, discussion regarding COVID-19 has shifted towards endemicity, and questions of living with, rather than directly battling, the virus. As a result, ethical questions are being refocussed. The imperative is beginning to shift towards what we can learn from the pandemic, and how we can better prepare for future global outbreaks. Among the questions that need to be addressed is what Covid-29 has taught us about how research can be conducted ethically during major global public health (...)
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  5.  7
    Ethics Briefing – December 2021.Dominic Norcliffe-Brown, Sophie Brannan, Martin Davies, Veronica English, Caroline Ann Harrison & Julian C. Sheather - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (2):150-152.
    In a recent judgment1 the Court of Protection was highly critical of health professionals for continuing to provide clinically-assisted nutrition and hydration in the face of disagreement about the patient’s best interests, without seeking to resolve the issue. This hearing had been set up specifically to consider whether GU’s dignity had been properly protected, and if not why not, given concerns raised by the Official Solicitor about what she considered to be “a complete abrogation of responsibility to consider properly or (...)
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  6.  7
    Ethics Briefing – February 2021.Dominic Norcliffe-Brown, Sophie Brannan, Martin Davies, Veronica English, Rebecca Mussell & Julian C. Sheather - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (4):287-288.
    In December, the National Data Guardian 1 for health and care in England, Dame Fiona Caldicott, published the outcomes of a public consultation about the Caldicott Principles and the role of Caldicott Guardians.1 The Caldicott Principles are good practice guidelines which have been used by health and social care organisations in the UK since 1997 to ensure that people’s data are kept safe and used in an ethical way.2 The role of the Caldicott Guardian is well-established in the UK. Caldicott (...)
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  7.  4
    Ethics Briefing.Dominic Norcliffe-Brown, Sophie Brannan, Veronica English, Olivia Lines, Rebecca Mussell & Julian C. Sheather - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (10):707-708.
    An Amnesty International briefing, published in July 2020, highlights the grave risks health workers are facing globally, particularly in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic.1 The report uses data from 63 countries across the world from January to June 2020 and is rich with examples. While recognising that information about the pandemic is constantly evolving, and each country is in a separate phase of the outbreak, Amnesty International draws attention to several troubling trends. By virtue of the role undertaken by (...)
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  8.  3
    Ethics Briefing – August 2021.Dominic Norcliffe-Brown, Sophie Brannan, Martin Davies, Veronica English, Caroline Ann Harrison & Julian C. Sheather - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (10):715-716.
    As the COVID-19 vaccine roll out continues apace, in the higher-income countries at least, concerns remain about the level of vaccine coverage in some health and social care settings. Although most countries have seen a relatively high uptake of vaccination against COVID-19 among staff, there continue to be some pockets of hesitancy. The risk of outbreaks in settings with potentially very vulnerable patients has led some governments across Europe to consider, or to introduce, measures compelling healthcare staff to be vaccinated. (...)
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  9.  1
    Ethics Briefing.Dominic Norcliffe-Brown, Sophie Brannan, Martin Davies, Veronica English, Rebecca Mussell & Julian C. Sheather - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (12):845-846.
    At the time of writing the COVID-19 pandemic was entering its ninth month, with nearly 800 000 recorded fatalities and 22 million infections in 188 countries and territories.1 In previous ethics briefings2 we raised concerns about the possibility that demand for life-sustaining treatment would overwhelm supply, with a consequent requirement for health professionals to make challenging triage decisions. Fortunately, to date, these have largely not been realised, although there is a possibility that countries in which containment measures have been less-successful, (...)
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  10.  1
    Ethics Briefing.Dominic Norcliffe-Brown, Sophie Brannan, Martin Davies, Veronica English, Caroline Ann Harrison & Julian C. Sheather - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):843-844.
    ### Challenge to the abortion act 1967 dismissed In September, the High Court dismissed a judicial review of the Abortion Act 1967 that sought a judgement of incompatibility with the European Convention on Human Rights.1 The case focused on a clause in the Act which permits abortion in England, Scotland and Wales after 24 weeks if there is a substantial risk that, if the child were born, it would suffer from ‘such physical or mental abnormalities as to be seriously handicapped’. (...)
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