5 found
Order:
  1.  15
    Relativism, Ambiguity and the Environmental Virtues.Dominic Lenzi - 2017 - Environmental Values 26 (1):91-109.
    In response to the looming environmental crisis, many have recommended lists of environmental virtues. As a result, environmental ethics has been enriched by new virtue terms, such as ecological sensitivity or kinship with nature, and with new applications of older terms, such as benevolence or care. But how do we know which of these are genuine virtues? Although this question is important, it is difficult to answer for two reasons. First, we might think of 'nature' in a variety of ways, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2.  8
    On the Permissibility (Or Otherwise) of Negative Emissions.Dominic Lenzi - 2021 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 24 (2):123-136.
    ABSTRACT Limiting dangerous climate change is now widely believed to require negative emissions, a prospect some believe to be unjust and unacceptably risky. While NETs are not risk-free, I argue that they could be part of minimally just responses to climate change. In doing so, I identify a dilemma between limiting warming to 1.5 ° C, which promises lower climate impacts but implies greater NETs risks, and 2°C, which requires less NETs but promises greater climate impacts. Finally, I consider what (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  27
    Deliberating About Climate Change: The Case for ‘Thinking and Nudging’.Dominic Lenzi - 2019 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 6 (2):313-336.
    Proponents of deliberative democracy believe deliberation provides the best chance of finding effective and legitimate climate policies. However, in many societies there is substantial evidence of biased cognition and polarisation about climate change. Further, many appear unable to distinguish reliable scientific information from false claims or misinformation. While deliberation significantly reduces polarisation about climate change, and can even increase the provision of reliable beliefs, these benefits are difficult to scale up, and are slow to affect whole societies. In response, I (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  4
    How Should We Respond to Climate Change? Virtue Ethics and Aggregation Problems.Dominic Lenzi - forthcoming - Journal of Social Philosophy.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  6
    Special Claims From Improvement: A Comment on Armstrong.Clare Heyward & Dominic Lenzi - 2021 - Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric 13 (1):17-32.
    Chris Armstrong argues that attempts at justifying special claims over natural resources generally take one of two forms: arguments from improvement and arguments from attachment. We argue that Armstrong fails to establish that the distinction between natural resources and improved resources has no normative significance. He succeeds only in showing that ‘improvers’ are not necessarily entitled to the full exchange value of the improvement. It can still be argued that the value of natural and improved resources should be distributed on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark