Results for 'Divine sovereignty'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Divine Sovereignty and Aseity.William E. Mann - 2005 - In William J. Wainwright (ed.), The Oxford handbook of philosophy of religion. New York: Oxford University Press.
    To say that God is sovereign over all things is to say that everything depends on God. To say that God exists a se is to say that Gods depends on nothing. This chapter examines and defends strong versions of five theses pertaining to God’s sovereignty and aseity: Everything that exists depends on God for its existence. Every situation that is the case depends on God for its being the case.God depends on nothing for his existence. God depends on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2. Divine Sovereignty and Human Responsibility: A Compatibilist Reconciliation.Steven Britt Cowan - 1996 - Dissertation, University of Arkansas
    This dissertation attempts to reconcile the apparent inconsistency between a strong view of divine sovereignty and human moral responsibility. God's absolute sovereignty over his creatures entails that human beings cannot do otherwise than they do. If so, then it would seem to follow that human beings cannot be held morally responsible for their actions. The notion that God has Middle Knowledge is often defended as a way out of this apparent inconsistency. It is argued, however, that counterfactuals (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  61
    Divine Sovereignty and The Global Climate Change Debate.Holly L. Wilson - 2011 - Essays in Philosophy 12 (1):8-15.
    Behind the global climate change debate are views of divine sovereignty. Those who believe that God is in charge of everything believe there is no change in the climate, but those who believe that God's sovereignty entails that we are responsible for working with the divine are willing to admit there is global climate change.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Divine Sovereignty and the Freedom of the Will.Hugh J. McCann - 1995 - Faith and Philosophy 12 (4):582-598.
    Libertarian treatments of free will face the objection that an uncaused human decision would lack full explanation, and hence violate the principle of sufficient reason. It is argued that this difficulty can be overcome if God, as creator, wills that I decide as I do, since my decision could then be explained in terms of his will, which must be for the best. It is further argued that this view does not make God the author of evil in any damaging (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  5.  63
    ``Divine Sovereignty and the Freedom of the Will".Hugh J. McCann - 1995 - Faith and Philosophy 12 (4):582-598.
    Libertarian treatments of free will face the objection that an uncaused human decision would lack full explanation, and hence violate the principle of sufficient reason. It is argued that this difficulty can be overcome if God, as creator, wills that I decide as I do, since my decision could then be explained in terms of his will, which must be for the best. It is further argued that this view does not make God the author of evil in any damaging (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  6.  5
    Divine sovereignty and human freedom.Samuel Fisk - 1973 - Neptune, N.J.,: Loizeaux Bros..
  7.  25
    Divine sovereignty and the Free Will Defence.Thomas P. Flint - 1984 - Sophia 23 (2):41-52.
  8. Divine sovereignty and the causal power of creatures : Aquinas's answer to the mutakallimun.Blake D. Dutton - 2004 - In Jeremiah Hackett, William E. Murnion & Carl N. Still (eds.), Being and Thought in Aquinas. Global Academic.
  9.  3
    Divine Sovereignty And The Global Climate Change Debate.Holly Wilson - 2010 - Essays in Philosophy 11 (1):8-15.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. People vs. God: The Logic of Divine Sovereignty in Islamic Democratic Discourse.Raja Bahlul - 2000 - Islam and Muslim-Christian Relations 11 (3):287-297.
    This paper aims at clarifying the role which the concept of 'divine sovereignty ' plays in the discussions which are taking place among Islamic thinkers (and others) concerning the possibility of democracy in an Islamic context. It argues that 'sovereignty ' has at least two meanings, one 'f'actual', the other 'normative'. The paper also argues that the second sense of 'sovereignty ' allows us to construe ta!k o{ 'divine sovereignty' as an attempt by Islamic (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  57
    Blameworthiness, Love, and Strong Divine Sovereignty.Peter Furlong - 2017 - Sophia 56 (3):419-433.
    In this paper, I explore some problems faced by those who endorse what I will call strong divine sovereignty. According to this view, every worldly event is guaranteed by God’s causal activity. The first problem this view faces is that it seems to make God morally blameworthy. I explore several possible ways for defenders of SDS to avoid this conclusion. Unfortunately, however, each of these solutions leaves another problem intact: if SDS is true, then it appears that God (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Evil and divine sovereignty.Jeff Jordan - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 88 (3):273-286.
    Since at least the tenth century, some theists have argued that God’s sovereignty as creator exempts God from moral evaluation, and so any argument employing moral principles or the idea of God as morally perfect is fallacious. In particular, any argument contending that the occurrence of pointless evil presents strong evidence against the existence of God is flawed, as God morally owes his creation nothing. This appeal to divine sovereignty, however, fails to rescue any theistic tradition proclaiming (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  6
    Dialogue with a Devious Divinity: Sovereignty, Kinship, and Kṛṣṇa’s Ethics in the Mahābhārata.Theodore Proferes - 2013 - Culture and Dialogue 3 (1):25-49.
    The character of Lord Kṛṣṇa has long confounded students of the Sanskrit epic, the Mahābhārata. In addition to the problem of his divinity, many have questioned the nature of Kṛṣṇa’s ethical standpoint, some presenting him as a being who transcends questions of right and wrong, others depicting him as unconcerned with the ethical limitations of human beings. This paper explores these issues through a close examination of Kṛṣṇa’s first significant dialogue with Yudhiṣṭḥira in the epic, in which he seeks to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  65
    Tertullian on Divine Sovereignty and Free Will.David Clark - 2019 - Philosophy and Theology 31 (1-2):3-19.
    Christian thinkers in the patristic era were not reluctant to integrate classical philosophy with biblical theology as they addressed the seeming incompatibility of free will and determinism (fate). This paper compares and contrasts Tertullian and the Stoics as they explain three issues relating to freedom and fate: 1) The operation of the Logos, 2) Theological Anthropology, and 3) Teleology. While in agreement with the Stoics on several key points, Tertullian crucially departs from them as he argues it is not by (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  38
    Tertullian on Divine Sovereignty and Free Will.David Clark - 2019 - Philosophy and Theology 31 (1):3-19.
    Christian thinkers in the patristic era were not reluctant to integrate classical philosophy with biblical theology as they addressed the seeming incompatibility of free will and determinism. This paper compares and contrasts Tertullian and the Stoics as they explain three issues relating to freedom and fate: 1) The operation of the Logos, 2) Theological Anthropology, and 3) Teleology. While in agreement with the Stoics on several key points, Tertullian crucially departs from them as he argues it is not by necessity—but (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. The Implications of Divine Sovereignty on Human Freedom.Phillip S. Jones Sr - manuscript
    What we must do is step back and take a grand view of the perspectives in order to understand it on a more particular level. If we can picture all of God’s attributes on a bar graph scale, all of God’s attributes would max out at 100% each. These attributes are always operating at 100%; at no time does any attribute diminish or decrease below 100%. However, there are times when one of His attributes shows forth more than another does, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  58
    The Problem of Divine Sovereignty and Human Freedom.William L. Rowe - 1999 - Faith and Philosophy 16 (1):98-101.
    According to the Westminster Confession, “God from all eternity did... freely and unchangeably ordain whatsoever comes to pass. Yet... thereby neither is God the author of sin or is violence offered to the will of the creatures.” It is hard to see how these two points can be consistently maintained. Hugh McCann, however, argues that by placing God’s decisions outside of time, both propositions are perfectly consistent. I agree with McCann that God’s determining decisions do not make him the author (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  18. Calvin on Scripture and Divine Sovereignty.John Murray - 1960
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Divine Simplicity, Aseity, and Sovereignty.Matthew Baddorf - 2017 - Sophia 56 (3):403-418.
    The doctrine of divine simplicity has recently been ably defended, but very little work has been done considering reasons to believe God is simple. This paper begins to address this lack. I consider whether divine aseity or the related notion of divine sovereignty provide us with good reason to affirm divine simplicity. Divine complexity has sometimes been thought to imply that God would possess an efficient cause; or, alternatively, that God would be grounded by (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  20.  21
    Predestination and Free Will: Four Views of Divine Sovereignty and Human Freedom.David Basinger & Randall Basinger (eds.) - 1986 - Intervarsity Press.
    David Basinger and Randall Basinger present four different answers to the question "If God is in control, are people really free?" Contributors include John Feinberg, Norman Geisler, Bruce Reichenbach and Clark Pinnock.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21. Hugh McCann on the Implications of Divine Sovereignty.William F. Vallicella - 2014 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (1):149-161.
    This review article summarizes and in part criticizes Hugh J. McCann’s detailed elaboration of the consequences of the idea that God is absolutely sovereign and thus unlimited in knowledge and power in his 2012 Creation and the Sovereignty of God. While there is much to agree with in McCann’s treatment, it is argued that divine sovereignty cannot extend as far as he would like to extend it. The absolute lord of the natural and moral orders cannot be (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22.  14
    Divine violence: Walter Benjamin and the eschatology of sovereignty.James R. Martel - 2012 - N.Y.: Routledge.
    Introduction: divine violence and political fetishism -- The political theology of sovereignty -- In the maw of sovereignty -- Benjamin's dissipated eschatology -- Waiting for justice -- Forgiveness, judgment and sovereign decision -- The Hebrew republic -- Conclusion : the anarchist hypothesis.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  23. Sovereignty and divinity in the vedic tradition: Mitra-varuna, prajā-pati and ṛta.Piyel Haldar - 2012 - Divus Thomas 115 (2):382-401.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  2
    Political-Theological Source of the “State of Exception”: Re-reading Sovereignty Within the Divine Oikonomia.Efe Baştürk - 2020 - Philosophia: International Journal of Philosophy (Philippine e-journal) 21 (2):187-200.
    The state of exception is mostly considered within the context of the modern sovereignty. Although the state of exception is thought within the modern paradigm of state governance, it carries a Christian context. The Christian context represents an eschatological way of power that comes in a miracle which cannot be interiorized by present. This divine way of governance therefore refers to a power which occurs as a threshold. The theological-political form of governance, which is also called the (...) oikonomia, shows the power of governance in creating an exception which cannot be foreseen by any current contexts. That is why the power of modern sovereignty resembles its archaic model in which the divine power of God is designated as a pure potentiality which cannot be limited within any contextuality. This article aims to explore the theological source of modern sovereignty in order to understand the very meaning of governance. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  7
    Political-theological source of the “state of exception”: Re-reading sovereignty within the divine oikonomia.Baştürk Baştürk - 2020 - Philosophia: International Journal of Philosophy (Philippine e-journal) 21 (2):187-200.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  12
    The Sovereignty of Reason: The Defense of Rationality in the Early English Enlightenment (review).John W. Yolton - 1998 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (1):138-139.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:The Sovereignty of Reason: The Defense of Rationality in the Early English Enlightenment by Frederick C. BeiserJohn W. YoltonFrederick C. Beiser. The Sovereignty of Reason: The Defense of Rationality in the Early English Enlightenment. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996. Pp. xi + 332. Cloth, $39.50.Beiser characterizes the methodology of his study as historical and philosophical: historical in placing texts in their own context and in uncovering (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  14
    The Sovereignty of Reason: The Defense of Rationality in the Early English Enlightenment (review).John W. Yolton - 1998 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (1):138-139.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:The Sovereignty of Reason: The Defense of Rationality in the Early English Enlightenment by Frederick C. BeiserJohn W. YoltonFrederick C. Beiser. The Sovereignty of Reason: The Defense of Rationality in the Early English Enlightenment. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996. Pp. xi + 332. Cloth, $39.50.Beiser characterizes the methodology of his study as historical and philosophical: historical in placing texts in their own context and in uncovering (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  17
    The King and the Crowd: Divine Right and Popular Sovereignty in the French Revolution.Robert G. Hamerton-Kelly - 1996 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 3 (1):67-83.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The King and the Crowd: Divine Right and Popular Sovereignty in the French Revolution Robert G. Hamerton-Kelly Stanford University We French cannot really think about politics or philosophy or literature without remembering that all this— politics, philosophy, literature—began, in the modem world, under the sign of a crime. A crime was committed in France in 1793. They killed a good and entirely likable king who was the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  20
    Divine Providence: God's Love and Human Freedom.Bruce R. Reichenbach - 2016 - Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock.
    We ask God to involve himself providentially in our lives, yet we cherish our freedom to choose and act. Employing both theological reflection and philosophical analysis, the author explores how to resolve the interesting and provocative puzzles arising from these seemingly conflicting desires. He inquires what sovereignty means and how sovereigns balance their power and prerogatives with the free responses of their subjects. Since we are physically embodied in a physical world, we also need to ask how this is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30. Sovereignty, law and majority: F.P.G. Guizot's contribution.Massimo Mancini - 1998 - In Ralf Dreier - Carla Faralli - Wladik S. Nersessiants (ed.), Law and politics between nature and history. Bologna, Italy: CLUEB. pp. 143-151.
    For Guizot, legal sovereignty is a divine, absolute prerogative precluded from mankind. The best possible form of government is that based upon a representative system, since such a system continuosly shifts the attibution of power from one subject to another. Guizot's analysis, which also denies the modern democratic principle of the sovereignty of the will of the people, examines certain aspects common to all representative systems, such as the relationship between the elected and the electorate and between (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Divine Simplicity and Divine Command Ethics.Susan Peppers-Bates - 2008 - International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (3):361-369.
    In this paper I will argue that a false assumption drives the attraction of philosophers to a divine command theory of morality. Specifically, I suggest the idea that anything not created by God is independent of God is a misconception. The idea misleads us into thinking that our only choice in offering a theistic ground for morality is between making God bow to a standard independent of his will or God creating morality in revealing his will. Yet what is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  64
    Divine glory in a Darwinian world.Christopher Southgate - 2014 - Zygon 49 (4):784-807.
    Faced with the ambiguities of this world, in which ugliness and suffering co-exist with beauty, the article rejects the attribution of disvalues to a Fall-event. Instead it faces God's involvement even in violence and ugliness. It explores the concept of divine glory, understood principally as a sign of the divine reality. This includes both the great theophanies of the Hebrew Bible and Jesus’ glorification in his Passion and Crucifixion. It then considers the contemplation of the natural world, using (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  33. Divine Nature and Divine Will.Hugh J. McCann - 2013 - Sophia 52 (1):77-94.
    This paper examines the relationship between God and those universals that characterize his nature. It is argued that God has sovereignty over his nature, even though he is not self-creating, and does not give rise to the universals that characterize his nature by any act of intellection. Rather, God is himself an act of rational willing in which all that is has its existence. Because the act that is God is one of free will, he has sovereignty over (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  22
    The Pragmatist Question of Sovereignty.Timothy Stanley - 2019 - Political Theology 20 (2):139-56.
    In Democracy and Tradition, Jeffrey Stout asks Christian political theologians if they can discern God's activity in modern democratic cultures. In so doing they might "acknowledge the sovereignty of God while transcending both resentment of, and absorption into, the secular." As Stout recognizes, the question of sovereignty is relevant not only to Christian, but also Jewish and Islamic thought. However, interreligious comparisons remain undeveloped in his work. In response, the following essay coordinates Stout’s pragmatism with developments in comparative (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  20
    Modality and Sovereignty.Hugh McCann - 2010 - Philosophia Christi 12 (2):289-296.
    Two important aspects of O’Connor’s Theism and Ultimate Explanation are explored. The first is whether God’s existence should be considered ontologically necessary. I suggest that although existence is essential to God, it is not a matter of ontological necessity. The second is whether prior to creating God deliberates about what universe or universes to create. I argue that he does not, that to say he does is to mistake creation for a kind of manufacturing. Implications of these claims regarding (...) sovereignty are briefly discussed. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  16
    The subject of sovereignty: relationality and the pivot past liberalism.Gregory Feldman - 2023 - New York: Berghahn Books.
    Seeking new forms of democracy, progressive politics raises a fundamental question: what is the alternative to the allegedly coherent, self-contained liberal subject that represents the project of modernity? Exploring the themes of nature, race, and the divine, this book identifies the more realistic alternative in the "relational subject": a subject that is inseparable from the global field of relations through which it emerges and yet distinct from that field because it lives a life that no one else ever has. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Do Divine Conceptualist Accounts Fail?Greg Welty - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (2):255-266.
    William Lane Craig’s God over All argues against the kind of “divine conceptualism” about abstract objects which I defend. In this conference presentation I note several points of agreement with and appreciation for Craig’s important work. I then turn to five points of critique and response pertaining to: the sovereignty-aseity intuition, the reality of false propositions, God’s having “inappropriate” thoughts, propositions being purely private and incommunicable, and a consistent view of God’s own ontological commitments. I conclude by summarizing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  5
    Suffering and Sovereignty of God According to John Piper and its Implication for the Church Today.Tigist Woyesa, James Obrempong & John Dilworth - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy Culture and Religion 5 (1):31-37.
    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze the theology of suffering from a biblical perspective by using literature review as methodology. Methodology: One of the foundational evangelical presuppositions for theological research is that Scripture is divinely authored and is therefore without error, and authoritative for our faith and practice. Findings: The study found that suffering is biblical and should be expected by all Christians as they are not exempted from it, unlike prosperity teaching. Suffering has the purpose of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  25
    Remythologizing theology: divine action, passion, and authorship.Kevin J. Vanhoozer - 2010 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    The rise of modern science and the proclaimed 'death' of God in the nineteenth century led to a radical questioning of divine action and authorship - Bultmann's celebrated 'demythologizing'. Remythologizing Theology moves in another direction that begins by taking seriously the biblical accounts of God's speaking. It establishes divine communicative action as the formal and material principle of theology, and suggests that interpersonal dialogue, rather than impersonal causality, is the keystone of God's relationship with the world. This original (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  40. Stumping Freedom: Divine Causality and the Will.James Dominic Rooney, Op - 2015 - New Blackfriars 96 (1066):711-722.
    The problems with grace and free will have prompted long-standing theological conflicts, chiefly revolving around certain disagreements over the nature of divine causality in respect to the free will's of creatures and His foreknowledge of free acts. Eleonore Stump offers a new interpretation of divine action on the will that holds God only acts by way of formal causality and that human cooperation with grace is only by way of "quiescence." I argue that this account lacks coherence in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  12
    Divine Spirit and Physical Power: Rabbi Shlomo Goren and the Military Ethic of the Israel Defense Forces.Arye Edrei - 2006 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 7 (1):255-297.
    The renewal of Jewish sovereignty in 1948 created a grave challenge to Jewish tradition. As a system that was constructed in exile for a non-sovereign society, Jewish law was lacking "laws of state." The legitimacy of military action and the distinction between just and unjust wars are prime examples of fundamental issues that Jews did not have to confront for a very long period of time. This article examines contemporary Jewish legal responses to the challenges posed by the creation (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  40
    The Dependence of Libertarianism on the Notion of Sovereignty: Rejoinder to Morton.Siegfried Van Duffel - 2009 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 21 (1):117-124.
    ABSTRACT G. E. Morton tries to defend libertarianism against my claim that it relies on an implausible secularization of ideas of divine sovereignty. But it is not true, as he claims, that morality itself entails human sovereignty: witness the moral theories of divine‐command theorists and philosophical consequentialists. Nor is it true that sovereignty can be conceptually transferred from God to equal human individuals, since they would have no legitimate way to legislate over each other, short (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  27
    Hugh J. McCann, Creation and the Sovereignty of God[REVIEW]Garrett Pendergraft - 2013 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 12.
  44.  14
    A biotheology of God’s divine action in the present global ecological precipice.Lisanne D. Winslow - 2022 - HTS Theological Studies 78 (2):7.
    Theological discourse surrounding the environmental crisis has rightly brought to the forefront human agency as a primary causal determinant. However, this article explores a theistic divine action position toward an account of the present global precipice that the earth and all its creatures teeter upon. The first section offers a preferred view of divine action theory, Divine Compositionalism, with explanatory power to account for an ever-changing planet. Furthermore, Divine Compositionalism is used to ground the role of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  12
    Causation, Creaturely and Divine.Angus J. L. Menuge - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):221-229.
    A biblical approach to reconciling God’s sovereignty with creaturely responsibility should avoid the extremes of global occasionalism and completely autonomous creatures. This paper evaluates the standard intermediary solutions offered by conservationists and concurrentists. It argues that while each contributes insights which a satisfactory account should retain, none is fully adequate. Even Leibniz’s sophisticated response, which accounts for providence, miracles, and moral responsibility, unacceptably abridges creaturely power to implement decisions. My alternative proposal seeks to explain how creatures can retain full (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  19
    Jean Bodin, scepticism and absolute sovereignty.D. Engster - 1996 - History of Political Thought 17 (4):469-499.
    While by no means intending to discount the importance of historical circumstances in motivating Bodin to change his definition of sovereignty, I suggest an alternative way for understanding this change. I study Bodin's writings in the intellectual context of his times, and argue that he proposed his absolutist theory of sovereignty as a way to preserve a minimal point of universal and immutable order for politics in a social world that he perceived as highly disorderly, corrupt and changing. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47.  6
    Reconsidering Constitutional Formation I National Sovereignty: A Comparative Analysis of the Juridification by Constitution.Ulrike Müssig (ed.) - 2016 - Cham: Imprint: Springer.
    Legal studies and consequently legal history focus on constitutional documents, believing in a nominalist autonomy of constitutional semantics.Reconsidering Constitutional Formation in the late 18th and 19th century, kept historic constitutions from being simply log-books for political experts through a functional approach to the interdependencies between constitution and public discourse. Sovereignty had to be 'believed' by the subjects and the political élites. Such a communicative orientation of constitutional processesbecame palpable in the 'religious' affinities of the constitutional preambles. They were held (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Illan Rua Wall.Turbulent Legality : Sovereignty, Security & The Police - 2018 - In Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Law and Theory. New York, NY: Routledge.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  13
    Modern Jewish philosophy and the politics of divine violence.Daniel Weiss - 2023 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Modern Jewish Philosophy and the Politics of Divine Violence Is commitment to God compatible with modern citizenship? In this book, Daniel H. Weiss provides new readings of four modern Jewish philosophers - Moses Mendelssohn, Hermann Cohen, Franz Rosenzweig, and Walter Benjamin - in light of classical rabbinic accounts of God's sovereignty, divine and human violence, and the embodied human being as the image of God. He demonstrates how classical rabbinic literature is relevant to contemporary political and philosophical (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Popular sovereignty and nationalism.Popular Sovereignty - 2001 - Political Theory 29 (4):517-536.
1 — 50 / 1000