12 found
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  1. Gesture, sign, and language: The coming of age of sign language and gesture studies.Susan Goldin-Meadow & Diane Brentari - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40:1-82.
    How does sign language compare with gesture, on the one hand, and spoken language on the other? Sign was once viewed as nothing more than a system of pictorial gestures without linguistic structure. More recently, researchers have argued that sign is no different from spoken language, with all of the same linguistic structures. The pendulum is currently swinging back toward the view that sign is gestural, or at least has gestural components. The goal of this review is to elucidate the (...)
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  2.  64
    Cognitive, Cultural, and Linguistic Sources of a Handshape Distinction Expressing Agentivity.Diane Brentari, Alessio Di Renzo, Jonathan Keane & Virginia Volterra - 2015 - Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):95-123.
    In this paper the cognitive, cultural, and linguistic bases for a pattern of conventionalization of two types of iconic handshapes are described. Work on sign languages has shown that handling handshapes and object handshapes express an agentive/non-agentive semantic distinction in many sign languages. H-HSs are used in agentive event descriptions and O-HSs are used in non-agentive event descriptions. In this work, American Sign Language and Italian Sign Language productions are compared as well as the corresponding groups of gesturers in each (...)
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  3.  23
    The communicative importance of agent-backgrounding: Evidence from homesign and Nicaraguan Sign Language.Lilia Rissman, Laura Horton, Molly Flaherty, Ann Senghas, Marie Coppola, Diane Brentari & Susan Goldin-Meadow - 2020 - Cognition 203 (C):104332.
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  4.  19
    From iconic handshapes to grammatical contrasts: longitudinal evidence from a child homesigner.Marie Coppola & Diane Brentari - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Many sign languages display crosslinguistic consistencies in the use of two iconic aspects of handshape, handshape type and finger group complexity. Handshape type is used systematically in form-meaning pairings (morphology): Handling handshapes (Handling-HSs), representing how objects are handled, tend to be used to express events with an agent (“hand-as-hand” iconicity), and Object handshapes (Object-HSs), representing an object's size/shape, are used more often to express events without an agent (“hand-as-object” iconicity). Second, in the distribution of meaningless properties of form (morphophonology), Object-HSs (...)
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  5.  10
    Sign language, like spoken language, promotes object categorization in young hearing infants.Miriam A. Novack, Diane Brentari, Susan Goldin-Meadow & Sandra Waxman - 2021 - Cognition 215 (C):104845.
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  6.  21
    Phonological reduplication in sign language: Rules rule.Iris Berent, Amanda Dupuis & Diane Brentari - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5:96556.
    Productivity—the hallmark of linguistic competence—is typically attributed to algebraic rules that support broad generalizations. Past research on spoken language has documented such generalizations in both adults and infants. But whether algebraic rules form part of the linguistic competence of signers remains unknown. To address this question, here we gauge the generalization afforded by American Sign Language (ASL). As a case study, we examine reduplication (X→XX)—a rule that, inter alia, generates ASL nouns from verbs. If signers encode this rule, then they (...)
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  7.  15
    Knowledge of Language Transfers From Speech to Sign: Evidence From Doubling.Iris Berent, Outi Bat‐El, Diane Brentari & Melanie Platt - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (1).
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  8.  11
    Production and Comprehension of Prosodic Markers in Sign Language Imperatives.Diane Brentari, Joshua Falk, Anastasia Giannakidou, Annika Herrmann, Elisabeth Volk & Markus Steinbach - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  9.  11
    Gesture and language: Distinct subsystem of an integrated whole.Susan Goldin-Meadow & Diane Brentari - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
    The commentaries have led us to entertain expansions of our paradigm to include new theoretical questions, new criteria for what counts as a gesture, and new data and populations to study. The expansions further reinforce the approach we took in the target article: namely, that linguistic and gestural components are two distinct yet integral sides of communication, which need to be studied together.
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  10.  12
    ANCHORING is amodal: Evidence from a signed language.Qatherine Andan, Outi Bat-El, Diane Brentari & Iris Berent - 2018 - Cognition 180 (C):279-283.
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  11.  2
    The Grammatical Incorporation of Demonstratives in an Emerging Tactile Language.Terra Edwards & Diane Brentari - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    In this article, we analyze the grammatical incorporation of demonstratives in a tactile language, emerging in communities of DeafBlind signers in the US who communicate via reciprocal, tactile channels—a practice known as “protactile.” In the first part of the paper, we report on a synchronic analysis of recent data, identifying four types of “taps,” which have taken on different functions in protacitle language and communication. In the second part of the paper, we report on a diachronic analysis of data collected (...)
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  12.  10
    Identifying the Correlations Between the Semantics and the Phonology of American Sign Language and British Sign Language: A Vector Space Approach.Aurora Martinez del Rio, Casey Ferrara, Sanghee J. Kim, Emre Hakgüder & Diane Brentari - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Over the history of research on sign languages, much scholarship has highlighted the pervasive presence of signs whose forms relate to their meaning in a non-arbitrary way. The presence of these forms suggests that sign language vocabularies are shaped, at least in part, by a pressure toward maintaining a link between form and meaning in wordforms. We use a vector space approach to test the ways this pressure might shape sign language vocabularies, examining how non-arbitrary forms are distributed within the (...)
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