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  1. Choosing to Feel. Virtue, Friendship, and Compassion for Friends.Diana Fritz Cates, Pamela M. Hall, G. Simon Harak, James F. Keenan, Daniel Mark Nelson & Paul J. Waddell - 1997 - Journal of Religious Ethics 26 (1):189-215.
    We are currently seeing a revival of interest in Aquinas's moral thought among Christian ethicists, both Protestant and Catholic. Although recent studies of his moral thought have touched on a number of topics, the majority of these have focused on his account of the virtues and their place in the Christian life. Probing the questions of the relation of virtue and law, the role of reason and will, and the place of the passions in Aquinas's moral theology, I will examine (...)
     
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  2.  41
    Conceiving Emotions: Martha Nussbaum's Upheavals of Thought.Diana Fritz Cates - 2003 - Journal of Religious Ethics 31 (2):325-341.
    In Upheavals of Thought, Martha Nussbaum offers a theory of the emotions. She argues that emotions are best conceived as thoughts, and she argues that emotion‐thoughts can make valuable contributions to the moral life. She develops extensive accounts of compassion and erotic love as thoughts that are of great moral import. This paper seeks to elucidate what it means, for Nussbaum, to say that emotions are forms of thought. It raises critical questions about her conception of the structure of emotion, (...)
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  3.  18
    In Honor and Memory of Sumner B. Twiss.Diana Fritz Cates, Irene Oh, Bruce Grelle, Simeon O. Ilesanmi, John Kelsay, Paul Lauritzen, David Little, Ping-Cheung “Pc” Lo & Kate E. Temoney - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (4):545-566.
    Sumner B. (Barney) Twiss, who died in 2023, was for ten years a General Editor of the Journal of Religious Ethics (JRE). He was a frequent contributor of articles, a member of the JRE Editorial Board, and a member of the journal's Board of Trustees. In this article, colleagues and students reflect on some of his many contributions, not only to the JRE but to the broader discursive fields of comparative religious ethics and human rights.
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  4.  19
    Relational Complexity and Ethical Responsibility.Diana Fritz Cates - 2019 - Journal of Religious Ethics 47 (1):154-165.
    Richard Miller uses the concepts of alterity and intimacy as touchstones for analyzing neglected aspects of our interpersonal and social relationships. He argues that, as persons in relation, we oscillate between experiences of alterity and intimacy, and it is with a greater awareness of this oscillation that we do best to consider our ethical responsibilities. This paper affirms the value of thinking about—and potentially reimagining—how we conceive and relate to various others. It also makes explicit that, as persons, each of (...)
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  5.  16
    Teaching Religion and Upholding Academic Freedom.Betsy Barre, Mark Berkson, Diana Fritz Cates, Stewart Clem, Simeon O. Ilesanmi, Thomas A. Lewis, Charles Mathewes, James McCarty, Irene Oh, Atalia Omer, Laurie L. Patton & Kayla Renee Wheeler - 2023 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (2):343-373.
    The editors of the JRE collected short essays from scholars of religion in response to a recent incident at Hamline University that made national headlines. Last fall, Hamline University administrators refused to extend a contract to an adjunct professor of art history after a Muslim student accused her of Islamophobia for showing a 14th‐century image of Mohammad in an online class. The event provoked intense conversations about issues of academic freedom, religious diversity, the status of contingent faculty, and race. These (...)
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  6.  17
    Aquinas, Feminism, and the Common Good.Diana Fritz Cates - 2005 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 25 (2):210-212.
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    Aquinas, Feminism, and the Common Good.Diana Fritz Cates - 2006 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 26 (2):221-223.
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  8.  65
    Experiential narratives of rape and torture.Diana Fritz Cates - 2010 - Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (1):43-66.
    Many Guatemalan women suffered extreme sexual violence during the latter half of the twentieth century. Learning of this violence can evoke hatred in persons who love and respect women—hatred for the men who perpetrated the violence and also for other men around the world who victimize women in this way. Hatred is a common response to a perceived evil, and it might in some cases be a fitting response, but it is important to subject one's emotions to critical moral reflection. (...)
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  9.  6
    The Religious Dimension of Ordinary Human Emotions.Diana Fritz Cates - 2005 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 25 (1):35-53.
    UNDERSTANDING HOW EMOTIONS ARE COMPOSED AS MENTAL STATES can help us understand the access many people have to their own emotions. It also can help us understand how people might increase this access and make more effective use of it in their efforts to become more free and responsible in their emotional lives. This essay focuses on some forms of cognition that enter into the composition of at least some emotional states. It shows how thoughts, beliefs, assumptions, intuitions, and questions (...)
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    The Value of Religious Ethics.Diana Fritz Cates - 2023 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (1):7-10.
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  11.  23
    You Deserve to Suffer for What You Did.Diana Fritz Cates - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (4):771-782.
    On many philosophical accounts, the emotion of anger includes a belief that we have been wrongly injured by someone, deliberately or from a lack of due regard. It includes also the belief that the person who injured us deserves to suffer for what she did. Her suffering would serve as fair payback for the suffering she caused us. In slightly different terms, anger includes a desire to strike back at someone who has injured us because we believe that hurting her (...)
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  12.  14
    The Nature of the Beast: Hatred in Cross-Traditional Religious and Philosophical Perspective.Joel Gereboff, Keith Green, Diana Fritz Cates & Maria Heim - 2009 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 29 (2):175-205.
    HATRED IS A PHENOMENON OF TREMENDOUS ETHICAL SIGNIFICANCE, YET it is poorly understood today. This essay explores some of the ways in which hatred is conceptualized and evaluated within different philosophical and religious traditions. Attention is focused on the Hebrew Bible and on the writings of Aristotle, Cicero, Seneca, Aquinas, and Buddhaghosa. Subtle differences mark various tradition-rooted accounts of the nature, causes, and effects of hatred. These differences yield different judgments about hatred's value and imply different methods for addressing the (...)
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  13.  7
    Editors’ Note.Irene Oh & Diana Fritz Cates - 2021 - Journal of Religious Ethics 49 (3):436-436.
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  14. Conceiving Emotions: Martha Nussbaum's Upheavals of Thought. [REVIEW]Diana Fritz Cates - 2003 - Journal of Religious Ethics 31 (2):325 - 341.
    In "Upheavals of Thought", Martha Nussbaum offers a theory of the emotions. She argues that emotions are best conceived as thoughts, and she argues that emotion-thoughts can make valuable contributions to the moral life. She develops extensive accounts of compassion and erotic love as thoughts that are of great moral import. This paper seeks to elucidate what it means, for Nussbaum, to say that emotions are forms of thought. It raises critical questions about her conception of the structure of emotion, (...)
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