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  1.  41
    Role Models and Moral Exemplars.Dennis J. Moberg - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (3):675-696.
    Role modeling is widely thought to be a principal vehicle for acquiring the virtues. Yet, little is known about role modeling as a process. This paper surveys the behavioral sciences for insights about how one person can find the actions of another person so inspirational that the person attempts to reproduce the behavior in question. In general, such inspiration occurs when an observer sees a model similar to herself, wrestling with a problem she is having, such that the model’s accomplishments (...)
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  2.  71
    Practical Wisdom and Business Ethics.Dennis J. Moberg - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (3):535-561.
    ABSTRACT:Practical wisdom has received scant attention in business ethics. Defined as a disposition toward cleverness in crafting morally excellent responses to, or in anticipation of, challenging particularities, practical wisdom has four psychological components: knowledge, emotion, thinking, and motivation. People's experience, reflection, and inspiration are theorized to determine their capacity for practical wisdom-related performance. Enhanced by their abilities to engage in moral imagination, systems thinking, and ethical reframing, this capacity is realized in the form of wisdom-related performance. This can be manifested (...)
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  3.  48
    Role Models and Moral Exemplars.Dennis J. Moberg - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (3):675-696.
    Role modeling is widely thought to be a principal vehicle for acquiring the virtues. Yet, little is known about role modeling as a process. This paper surveys the behavioral sciences for insights about how one person can find the actions of another person so inspirational that the person attempts to reproduce the behavior in question. In general, such inspiration occurs when an observer sees a model similar to herself, wrestling with a problem she is having, such that the model’s accomplishments (...)
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  4.  31
    The Big Five and Organizational Virtue.Dennis J. Moberg - 1999 - Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (2):245-272.
    Abstract:Recent developments in personality research point to an alchemy of character composed of five elements: extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience. This paper surveys this research for its implications to the study of the virtues in organizational ethics. After subjecting each of these five character traits to several tests as to what constitutes a virtue, the empirical evidence supports an organizational virtue of agreeableness and an organizational virtue of conscientiousness. Although the empirical evidence falls short, an argument is (...)
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  5.  74
    Making Business Ethics Practical.Gerald F. Cavanagh, Dennis J. Moberg & Manuel Velasquez - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (3):399-418.
    Abstract:Our critics confuse the role normative ethical theory can take in business ethics. We argue that as a practical discipline, business ethics must focus on norms, not the theories from which the norms derive. It is true that our original work is defective, but not in its form, but in its neglect of contemporary advances in feminist ethics.
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  6.  29
    The Big Five and Organizational Virtue.Dennis J. Moberg - 1999 - Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (2):245-272.
    Abstract:Recent developments in personality research point to an alchemy of character composed of five elements: extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience. This paper surveys this research for its implications to the study of the virtues in organizational ethics. After subjecting each of these five character traits to several tests as to what constitutes a virtue, the empirical evidence supports an organizational virtue of agreeableness and an organizational virtue of conscientiousness. Although the empirical evidence falls short, an argument is (...)
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  7.  49
    An Ethical Analysis of Hierarchical Relations in Organizations.Dennis J. Moberg - 1994 - Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (2):205-220.
    Ethical analyses of the relations between managers and subordinates have traditionally focused on the employment contract. The inequality and requisite mutual trust between managers and subordinates makes the sub-disciplines of professional ethics and feminist ethics more applicable than the contractarian perspective. When professional ethics is applied to hierarchic relationships, specific obligations emerge for managers and subordinates alike. The application of feminist ethics results in the identification of an entirely different, though not contradictory, set of obligations. In toto, the analysis improves (...)
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  8.  37
    On Employee Vice.Dennis J. Moberg - 1997 - Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (4):41-60.
    Abstract:Vice is a neglected concept in business ethics. This paper attempts to bring vice back into the contemporary dialogue by exploring one vice that is destructive to employee and organization alike. Interestingly, this vice was first described by Aristotle asakolastos. Drawing extensively on the criminology literature, the findings challenge both common sense and popular images of white-collar crime and criminals. While not all instances of employee betrayal are attributable to vice, some most certainly are, and the paper offers a description (...)
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  9. The Ethics of Mentoring.Dennis J. Moberg & Manuel Velasquez - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (1):95-122.
    Abstract:Mentoring is an age-old process that continues to be practiced in most contemporary organizations. Although mentors are often heralded as virtuous agents of essential continuity, mentoring commonly results in serious dysfunctions. Not only do mentors too often exclude people different from themselves, but also the people they mentor are frequently abused in the process. Based on the conception of mentor as a quasi-professional, this paper lays out the ethical responsibilities of both parties in the mentoring process.
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  10.  45
    Time Pressure and Ethical Decision-Making.Dennis J. Moberg - 2000 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 19 (2):41-67.
  11.  41
    A deontological analysis of Peer relations in organizations.Dennis J. Moberg & Michael J. Meyer - 1990 - Journal of Business Ethics 9 (11):863 - 877.
    Using practical formalism a deontological ethical analysis of peer relations in organizations is developed. This analysis is composed of two types of duties derived from Kant's Categorical Imperative: negative duties to refrain from the use of peers and positive duties to provide help and assistance. The conditions under which these duties pertain are specified through the development of examples and conceptual distinctions. A number of implications are then discussed.
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  12.  27
    Trustworthiness and Conscientiousness as Managerial Virtues.Dennis J. Moberg - 1997 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 16 (1-2):171-194.
  13.  28
    Managers as Judges in Employee Disputes: An Occasion for Moral Imagination.Dennis J. Moberg - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (4):453-477.
    Abstract:Employee-employee conflicts are common occasions for managerial intervention. In judging such disputes, managers bring to encounters a frame that is not conducive to employee due process. Making managers aware of their legal responsibilities in resolving employee disputes is a poor substitute for managers’ understanding and implementation of their ethical due process obligations. Moreover, moral imagination is necessary in order to counter the effects of the managerial frame that employees are either not worthy of due process protections or that such protections (...)
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  14.  15
    Managers as Judges in Employee Disputes: An Occasion for Moral Imagination.Dennis J. Moberg - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (4):453-477.
    Abstract:Employee-employee conflicts are common occasions for managerial intervention. In judging such disputes, managers bring to encounters a frame that is not conducive to employee due process. Making managers aware of their legal responsibilities in resolving employee disputes is a poor substitute for managers’ understanding and implementation of their ethical due process obligations. Moreover, moral imagination is necessary in order to counter the effects of the managerial frame that employees are either not worthy of due process protections or that such protections (...)
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  15.  21
    The Aging Workforce: Implications for Ethical Practice.Dennis J. Moberg - 2001 - Business and Society Review 106 (4):315-329.
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  16.  8
    Guest Editors’ Introduction.Martin Calkins, Dennis J. Moberg, Manuel Velasquez & David Perry - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 38 (1-2).
    Introduction to a collection of articles originally presented at a February 2001 conference hosted by the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics, Santa Clara University.
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  17.  5
    Guest Editors’ Introduction.Martin Calkins, Dennis J. Moberg, Manuel Velasquez & David Perry - 2000 - Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 8 (3-4):1-2.
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  18.  4
    The next phase of business ethics: integrating psychology and ethics.John William Dienhart, Dennis J. Moberg & Ronald F. Duska (eds.) - 2001 - New York: JAI.
    In searching for appropriate business ethics for the 21st century, it is necessary to embrace a range of inter-related disciplines such as psychology and ethics, but also areas including philosophy, politics and religion. This text acts as an example of interdisciplinary scholarship.
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  19.  16
    Giving Business Ethics Advice.Dennis J. Moberg - 2002 - Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 10 (1):3-38.
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  20.  7
    Moral imagination and management decision making.Dennis J. Moberg - 2001 - Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (2):373.
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  21.  11
    The Moral Weight of Thinking Thin.Dennis J. Moberg - 2001 - Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (2):373-377.
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  22.  9
    The Moral Weight of Thinking Thin - Moral Imagination and Management Decision MakingPatricia H. Werhane New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.Dennis J. Moberg - 2001 - Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (2):373-377.
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  23.  51
    Reflection in business ethics: Insights from st. Ignatius' spiritual exercises. [REVIEW]Dennis J. Moberg & Martin Calkins - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 33 (3):257 - 270.
    We examine the Spiritual Exercises developed by St. Ignatius Loyola for the purpose of informing the structure of reflection as a tool in business ethics. At present, reflection in business is used to clarify moods, expectations, theories of use, and defining moments. We suggest here that Ignatius' Exercises, which focus on ends, engage the emotions and imagination, use role modeling, and require a response, might be useful as a model for reflection in business.
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  24.  35
    Helping subordinates with their personal problems: A moral dilemma for managers. [REVIEW]Dennis J. Moberg - 1990 - Journal of Business Ethics 9 (6):519-531.
    When subordinates ask their managers for help with their personal problems, it creates moral dilemmas for their managers. Managers are contractually obliged to maintain equivalent relations between their subordinates and that is compromised when one subordinate makes this kind of request. By applying deontological principles to this dilemma, additional options are revealed, and the moral duties managers owe their subordinates in these situations are clarified.
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