Results for 'Denis Foster Johnston'

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  1. Other Notices.William Y. Adams, James H. Howard & Denis Foster Johnston - forthcoming - The Eugenics Review.
  2.  13
    Fostering Trusting Relationships with Older Immigrants Hospitalised for End-of-Life Care.Johnstone Megan-Jane, Rawson Helen, Hutchinson Alison Margaret & Redley Bernice - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301666497.
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  3.  27
    Genomics and the Biology of Parasites.David A. Johnston, Mark L. Blaxter, Wim M. Degrave, Jeremy Foster, Alasdair C. Ivens & Sara E. Melville - 1999 - Bioessays 21 (2):131-147.
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  4.  8
    The Turnaway Study: Ten Years, a Thousand Women, and the Consequences of Having—or Being Denied—an Abortion by Diana Green Foster.Kathryn MacKay - 2021 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 14 (2):196-200.
    One thousand women. Ten years. Diana Greene Foster’s epic Turnaway Study, and its namesake book, followed a thousand women who sought abortions across the United States for a decade after they were or were not successful in ending unwanted pregnancies to document how their lives changed. The result is a book rich in detail, full of facts about abortion in the United States—and somewhat more generally—that perhaps many of us knew or suspected but few could find in print. These (...)
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  5.  11
    Huddling Behavior of Spiny Mouse Pups Toward Foster Siblings From Another Species.Joseph Miele, Jennifer Wheeler Makin, Simone Russo, Kathleen Cameron, Frank Costantini & Richard Deni - 1983 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 21 (6):479-482.
  6.  17
    Size, Power, Death Constituents in the Making of Human Morality.M. Sheets-Johnstone - 2002 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (2):49-67.
    Any explanation of the origin and nature of human morality must take into account a powerful and inescapable pan-cultural human awareness. Death is the great pan-cultural human leveller and human awareness of death is a near life-long awareness. However metaphysically or religiously conceived, however long postponed by medical science, however softened by belief or by faith, the basic human fact and fear of death cannot be denied. Neither, in opposition, can the basic human craving for more life.
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  7. Human Beings, Human Animals, and Mentalistic Survival.Denis Robinson - 2007 - In Dean Zimmerman (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics: Volume 3. Oxford University Press. pp. 3-32.
    I critically discuss both the particular doctrinal and general meta-philosophical or methodological tenets of Mark Johnston's paper "Human Beings", attending to several weaknesses in his argument. One of the most important amongst them is an apparent reliance on a substitution of identicals within an intensional context as he argues that continuity of functioning brain is essential to the persistence of "Human Beings" as allegedly singled out by his methodology; another equally important is a simple lacuna in place of an (...)
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  8.  37
    Worm-Theoretic Persistence and Temporal Predication: A Reply to Johnston’s Personite Problem.Andrew Russo - forthcoming - Southwest Philosophy Review.
    Mark Johnston (2016, 2017) has raised concerns that a worm-theoretic account of persistence through time is incompatible with ethical singularity: that within the life of any actual person, there is only one morally considerable being, namely that person. To deny ethical singularity is to deny a core feature of our ordinary ethical and prudential thinking. The worm theory, Johnston concludes, proves to be “disastrous … for our ordinary moral outlook”. This paper defends the worm theory from Johnston’s (...)
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  9.  59
    Hume's Arguments Concerning Causal Necessity.Henry W. Johnstone - 1955 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 16 (3):331-340.
    An analysis of effectiveness of some of hume's arguments in a framework developed by the author. The author states his position that arguments attacking positions attempt to show that, Given the assumptions of a position, Certain consequences are incompatible with it--A valid species of "argumentum ad hominem". Although this species does not work for constructive philosophical "proofs," it will work inversely in arguments (defending such proofs) which cite possible objections. These charge "petitio": the objection assumes what the position denies or (...)
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  10. Denis Papin's Digester and its Eighteenth-Century European Circulation.Marco Storni - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (4):443-463.
    The digester, invented by Denis Papin in the 1680s, was a rudimentary pressure cooker used to soften hard bodies by boiling them at high pressure. In this paper, I propose a reassessment of Papin's work on the digester, arguing that his research was located at the intersection of the chemical laboratory and cooking practice. I then examine cases from the eighteenth-century European circulation of the instrument in Sweden, Italy and the Netherlands in order to showcase the different practices in (...)
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  11.  35
    Changing Values: A Commentary on Hall.Lori Gruen, William Johnston & Clement Loo - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (2):142 - 144.
    We think Hall (2013) is correct in arguing that the environmental movement needs a stronger narrative and believe that such a narrative requires significant nuance. Hall rightly recognizes the importance of appropriately framing the current narratives appealed to by the environmental movement. They are too simplistic and, as such, misleading. The optimistic frames tend to ignore the real losses people experience in trying to live greener lifestyles. The ‘doom and gloom’ frames are apt to foster a sense of hopelessness (...)
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  12.  18
    Identity, Personhood and the Law: A Response to Ashcroft and McGee.Charles Foster & Jonathan Herring - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (1):73-74.
    We are very grateful to Richard Ashcroft1 and Andrew McGee2 for their thoughtful and articulate criticisms of our views.3 Ashcroft has disappointingly low aspirations for the law. Of course he is right to say that the law is not a ‘self-sufficient, integrated and self-interpreting system of doctrine’. The law is often philosophically incoherent and internally contradictory. But it does not follow from this that all areas of the law are philosophically unsatisfactory. And if that were true, the response should not (...)
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  13.  98
    Tractarian Objects and Logical Categories.Colin Johnston - 2009 - Synthese 167 (1):145 - 161.
    It has been much debated whether Tractarian objects are what Russell would have called particulars or whether they include also properties and relations. This paper claims that the debate is misguided: there is no logical category such that Wittgenstein intended the reader of the Tractatus to understand his objects either as providing examples of or as not providing examples of that category. This is not to say that Wittgenstein set himself against the very idea of a logical category: quite the (...)
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  14.  8
    Prolonged Life and Good Death in Antiquity.Denis Bugaev & Svetlana Martynova - 2020 - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 10 (1-2):1-9.
    This paper studies the connections between the notions of prolonging life and a good death in Antiquity. It is demonstrated that while prolonged life generally meant forestalling the human constitution’s death, ancient philosophers also pointed to the limitations of prolongation. The paper shows how philosophers welcomed prolonged life when it was shown to foster movement toward the good, such as self-realization and social usefulness. Yet, they rejected prolongation when it led to the perpetuation of evil, such as social uselessness (...)
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  15.  29
    The Modal Octagon and John Buridan's Modal Ontology.Spencer Johnston - 2017 - In J. Béziau & G. Basti (eds.), The Square of Opposition: A Cornerstone of Thought. Springer. pp. 35-52.
    In this paper we will argue that the ontology implicit in John Buridan’s modal octagon commits him to a form of contingentism. In particular, we will argue that Buridan is committed to denying the validity of the Barcan and converse Barcan formulae.
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  16.  10
    Kant’s Impure Ethics: From Rational Beings to Human Beings. [REVIEW]Lara Denis - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (2):491-493.
    The “impure” part of Kant’s ethics consists of material concerning empirical knowledge of human beings. Kant is well-known for his insistence that the supreme moral principle must be discovered through non-empirical consideration of such notions as morality and rational wills. What is less appreciated is that Kant recognized what his critics have always said: that a pure ethics for rational beings in general cannot provide adequate, practical guidance for human beings in particular, real-world situations. Nor can a pure ethics answer (...)
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  17. Shifting Perspectives: Holography and the Emergence of Technical Communities.Sean F. Johnston - 2005 - Technology and Culture 46 (1):77-103.
    Holography, the technology of three-dimensional imaging, has repeatedly been reconceptualised by new communities. Conceived in 1947 as a means of improving electron microscopy, holography was revitalized in the early 1960s by engineer-scientists at classified laboratories. The invention promoted the transformation of a would-be discipline (optical engineering) and spawned limited artist-scientist collaborations. However, a separate artisanal community promoted a distinct countercultural form of holography via a revolutionary technology: the sandbox optical table. Their tools, sponsorship, products, literature and engagement with wider culture (...)
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  18.  20
    Beyond Costs and Benefits: Weighing Environmental Goods.John Foster - 1994 - Analyse & Kritik 16 (2):133-149.
    A teleological approach to deciding how we should act underlies the attempted extension of neo-classical economics to environmental issues, with its emphasis on comparative valuation in monetary terms. Such an extension fails because, in the environmental sphere, there are powerful reasons for denying commensurability of the relevant values. But this denial then tends to undercut any weighing of environmental goods. In response to this difficulty, the paper seeks to develop an account of the weighing of goods which would enable us (...)
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  19.  52
    Affective Life Between Signifiers and Jouis-Sens: Lacan’s Senti-Ments and Affectuations.Adrian Johnston - 2009 - Filozofski Vestnik 30 (2).
    Not only is Lacan’s repeatedly advanced assertion that Freud categorically denies the existence of unconscious affects a misleading oversimplification of Freud’s various ambivalent discussions of this issue—Lacan’s own circumnavigations around the topic of affect are much more nuanced and subtle than either he or many of his commentators often acknowledge. What’s more, such complexities aren’t confined solely to the tenth seminar of 1962-1963 devoted to a sustained discussion of anxiety, a seminar to which Lacan sometimes appeals in response to criticisms (...)
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  20. The Evolution of Consciousness and the Individuation Process.David Johnston - 1996 - Dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute
    This dissertation is a heuristic and hermeneutic research paper on the evolution of consciousness and the individuation process. I begin by examining the question of the evolution of consciousness and its significance regarding individuation in the work of four different authors: Jung, Neumann, Sri Aurobindo, and Gebser. I then study the nature of the development of the Western mind since the period of the Greek philosophers up to postmodernism and beyond. Finally, I discuss the meaning of the individuation process. ;All (...)
     
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  21. Cartesian Solipsism: An Analytic/Phenomenological Refutation.Albert Arnold Johnstone - 1984 - Dissertation, University of Waterloo (Canada)
    The skeptical doubts entertained by Descartes give rise to seven distinct theses characterizable as solipsistic, each focused on one of three general epistemological problems, that of the reality of the perceived, that of the existence of the unperceived, and the so-called problem of the existence of an external world. The skeptical challenge in each case is concerned not with absolute certainty, but with the question of whether there is any warrant whatever for bridging the evidential gap between data and common-sense (...)
     
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  22.  13
    American Dionysia.Steven Johnston - 2009 - Contemporary Political Theory 8 (3):255-275.
    Pluralism's renaissance, thanks to William Connolly, Chantal Mouffe and others, has established its position as the distinctive voice of late modern democracy. It thus calls for an explicit theory of tragedy to address the antagonisms and enmities it reflects and fosters. Treating Machiavelli, Rousseau, Nietzsche, Weber and Camus as members of a minor tradition of thought, I articulate a political conception of tragedy that flows not from the failures of politics but, ironically, from politics at its best. A tragic understanding (...)
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  23.  31
    Rationalized Epistemology: Taking Solipsism Seriously.Albert A. Johnstone - 1991 - State University of New York Press.
    Roughly characterized, solipsism is the skeptical thesis that there is no reason to think that anything exists other than oneself and one’s present experience. Since its inception in the reflections of Descartes, the thesis has taken three broad and sometimes overlapping forms: Internal World Solipsism that arises from an account of perception in terms of representations of an external world; Observed World Solipsism that arises from doubts as to the existence of what is not actually present sensuously in experience; Unreal (...)
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  24.  16
    Is It Arrogant to Deny Climate Change or is It Arrogant to Say It is Arrogant? Understanding Arrogance and Cultivating Humility in Climate Change Discourse and Education.Matt Ferkany - 2015 - Environmental Values 24 (6):705-724.
    This paper assesses the charge that climate change denial is arrogant and considers the educational priorities most appropriate to fostering greater humility about the climate change problem. I argue that even denial formed in ignorance of the organised misinformation campaign often constitutes a kind of arrogance, but that it is quite possible to humbly doubt the climate change problem. In some cases denial flows from other more or less serious errors or vices, such as ignorance, sincere but mistaken belief, dishonesty (...)
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  25.  62
    Educational Values and Goals: Some Dispositions to Be Fostered.William K. Frankena - 1968 - The Monist 52 (1):1-10.
    There has been much impatience with what R. S. Peters calls “the endless talk about the aims of education,” but this talk continues to go on, and we are invited to add to it on this happy occasion. Indeed, those who deny that education has ends or that educators must have aims seem always to end up talking about much the same thing in a slightly different idiom. At any rate, I am quite ready, at least on this occasion, to (...)
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  26.  5
    Optimizing Performative Skills in Social Interaction: Insights From Embodied Cognition, Music Education, and Sport Psychology.Andrea Schiavio, Vincent Gesbert, Mark Reybrouck, Denis Hauw & Richard Parncutt - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Embodied approaches to cognition conceive of mental life as emerging from the ongoing relationship between neural and extra-neural resources. The latter include, first and foremost, our entire body, but also the activity patterns enacted within a contingent milieu, cultural norms, social factors, and the features of the environment that can be used to enhance our cognitive capacities (e.g., tools, devices, etc.). Recent work in music education and sport psychology has applied general principles of embodiment to a number of social contexts (...)
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  27. INSPIRED but Tired: How Medical Faculty’s Job Demands and Resources Lead to Engagement, Work-Life Conflict, and Burnout.Rebecca S. Lee, Leanne S. Son Hing, Vishi Gnanakumaran, Shelly K. Weiss, Donna S. Lero, Peter A. Hausdorf & Denis Daneman - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    BackgroundPast research shows that physicians experience high ill-being but also high well-being.ObjectiveTo shed light on how medical faculty’s experiences of their job demands and job resources might differentially affect their ill-being and their well-being with special attention to the role that the work-life interface plays in these processes.MethodsQualitative thematic analysis was used to analyze interviews from 30 medical faculty at a top research hospital in Canada.FindingsMedical faculty’s experiences of work-life conflict were severe. Faculty’s job demands had coalescing effects on their (...)
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  28. The Existence of Personites.Matti Eklund - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 177 (7):2051-2071.
    Mark Johnston and Eric Olson have both pressed what Johnston has dubbed the personite problem. Personites, if they exist, are person-like entities whose lives extend over a continuous proper part of a person’s life. They are so person-like that they seem to have moral status if persons do. But this threatens to wreak havoc with ordinary moral thinking. For example, simple decisions to suffer some short-term hardship for long-term benefits become problematic. And ordinary punishment is always also punishment (...)
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  29.  14
    Look Who's Talking! Varieties of Ego-Dissolution Without Paradox.Sascha Benjamin Fink - 2020 - Philosophy and the Mind Sciences 1 (I):1-36.
    How to model non-egoic experiences – mental events with phenomenal aspects that lack a felt self – has become an interesting research question. The main source of evidence for the existence of such non-egoic experiences are self-ascriptions of non-egoic experiences. In these, a person says about herself that she underwent an episode where she was conscious but lacked a feeling of self. Some interpret these as accurate reports, but this is questionable. Thomas Metzinger, Rocco Gennaro, and Charles Foster have (...)
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  30.  27
    Emotions in Context: A Sociodynamic Model of Emotions.Batja Mesquita & Michael Boiger - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (4):298-302.
    We propose a sociodynamic model of emotions, in which emotions are seen as dynamic systems that emerge from the interactions and relationships in which they take place. Our model does not deny that emotions are biologically constrained, yet it takes seriously that emotions are situated in specific contexts. We conceive emotions as largely functional to the sociocultural environment in which they occur; this is so because sociocultural environments foster the emergence of emotions that positively contribute to social cohesion. The (...)
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  31.  1
    Evolutionary Causation: Biological and Philosophical Reflections.Tobias Uller & Kevin N. Laland (eds.) - 2019 - MIT Press.
    A comprehensive treatment of the concept of causation in evolutionary biology that makes clear its central role in both historical and contemporary debates. Most scientific explanations are causal. This is certainly the case in evolutionary biology, which seeks to explain the diversity of life and the adaptive fit between organisms and their surroundings. The nature of causation in evolutionary biology, however, is contentious. How causation is understood shapes the structure of evolutionary theory, and historical and contemporary debates in evolutionary biology (...)
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  32. Mary's Powers of Imagination.Amy Kind - 2019 - In Sam Coleman (ed.), The Knowledge Argument. Cambridge University Press. pp. 161-179.
    One common response to the knowledge argument is the ability hypothesis. Proponents of the ability hypothesis accept that Mary learns what seeing red is like when she exits her black-and-white room, but they deny that the kind of knowledge she gains is propositional in nature. Rather, she acquires a cluster of abilities that she previously lacked, in particular, the abilities to recognize, remember, and imagine the color red. For proponents of the ability hypothesis, knowing what an experience is like simply (...)
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  33.  22
    What Will It Mean to Be Green? Envisioning Positive Possibilities Without Dismissing Loss.Cheryl Hall - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (2):125 - 141.
    Convinced of the importance of framing, many environmentalists have begun emphasizing positive visions of a happy and healthy green future rather than gloomy pictures of deprivation and sacrifice. ?Gloom and doom? discourses foster despair and resistance, they worry, instead of hope and motivation to change. While positive visions are crucial, though, it is ineffective to deny that living more sustainably will involve any loss. Since people value many incompatible things, living more sustainably will inevitably entail both sacrifice and reward. (...)
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  34. Nine Ways to Bias Open-Source AGI Toward Friendliness.Ben Goertzel & Joel Pitt - 2011 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 22 (1):116-131.
    While it seems unlikely that any method of guaranteeing human-friendliness on the part of advanced Artificial General Intelligence systems will be possible, this doesn’t mean the only alternatives are throttling AGI development to safeguard humanity, or plunging recklessly into the complete unknown. Without denying the presence of a certain irreducible uncertainty in such matters, it is still sensible to explore ways of biasing the odds in a favorable way, such that newly created AI systems are significantly more likely than not (...)
     
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  35.  11
    Adorno, Kant and Enlightenment.Deborah Cook - 2020 - Kantian Review 25 (4):541-557.
    Theodor W. Adorno often made reference to Immanuel Kant’s famous essay on enlightenment. Although he denied that immaturity is self-incurred, the first section of this article will show that he adopted many of Kant’s ideas about maturity in his philosophically informed critique of monopoly conditions under late capitalism. The second section will explore Adorno’s claim that the educational system could foster maturity by encouraging critical reflection on the social conditions that have made us what we are. Finally, this article (...)
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  36.  57
    Lying in Business: Insights From Hannah Arendt's 'Lying in Politics'.Piet Eenkhoorn & Johan J. Graafland - 2011 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 20 (4):359-374.
    The political philosopher Hannah Arendt develops several arguments regarding why truthfulness cannot be counted among the political virtues. This article shows that similar arguments apply to lying in business. Based on Hannah Arendt's theory, we distinguish five reasons why lying is a structural temptation to businessmen: business is about action to change the world and therefore businessmen need the capacity to deny current reality; commerce requires successful image-making and liars have the advantage to come up with plausible stories; business communication (...)
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  37.  8
    Internal Perception: The Role of Bodily Information in Concepts and Word Mastery.Luigi Pastore & Sara Dellantonio - 2017 - Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
    Chapter 1 First Person Access to Mental States. Mind Science and Subjective Qualities -/- Abstract. The philosophy of mind as we know it today starts with Ryle. What defines and at the same time differentiates it from the previous tradition of study on mind is the persuasion that any rigorous approach to mental phenomena must conform to the criteria of scientificity applied by the natural sciences, i.e. its investigations and results must be intersubjectively and publicly controllable. In Ryle’s view, philosophy (...)
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  38. What is a Biobank? Differing Definitions Among Biobank Stakeholders.David Shaw, Bernice Elger & Flora Colledge - 2014 - Clinical Genetics 85 (3):223-7.
    Aim: While there is widespread agreement on the broad aspects of what constitutes a biobank, there is much disagreement regarding the precise definition. This research aimed to describe and analyse the definitions of the term biobank offered by various stakeholders in biobanking. Methods: Interviews were conducted with 36 biobanking stakeholders with international experience currently working in Switzerland. Results: The results show that, in addition to the core concepts of biological samples and linked data, the planned use of samples (including sharing) (...)
     
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  39.  51
    "Philosophy of Dance" (Essay-Review).Julie van Camp - unknown
    Philosophical consideration of dance has gained in vigor, diversity, and sophistication in recent decades -- even though philosophers disagree sharply on what philosophy is! Divergent methodological approaches range from the phenomenological explorations of Maxine Sheets- Johnstone, the existentialist approach of Sandra Horton Fraleigh, and the postmodernist continental work of Susan Foster to more traditional "British-American" analysis by such well-known philosophers as Nelson Goodman, Joseph Margolis, and Francis Sparshott.
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  40.  71
    The 'Economy of Memory': Publications, Citations, and the Paradox of Effective Research Governance.Peter Woelert - 2013 - Minerva 51 (3):341-362.
    More recent advancements in digital technologies have significantly alleviated the dissemination of new scientific ideas as well as the storing, searching and retrieval of large amounts of published research findings. While not denying the benefits of this novel ‘economy of memory,’ this paper endeavors to shed light on the ways in which the use of digital technologies may be linked to a distortion of the system of formal publications that facilitates the effective dissemination and collaborative building of scientific knowledge. Through (...)
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  41.  5
    Horizons in Human Geography.Derek Gregory & Rex Walford (eds.) - 1989 - Barnes & Noble.
    Human geography, as a subject, has become widely recognized since its connections with the social sciences have widened and deepended the study of people, places and social structures. Horizons in Human Geography provides a clear and accessible sketch map of some of the latest and most promising developments in the subject. The book starts by assessing the role and limitations of techniques, models and theories and proceeds to provide a broad-ranging overview of the major social, cultural, urban, regional, political, economic (...)
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  42.  56
    Bang Bang - A Response to Vincent W.J. Van Gerven Oei.Jeremy Fernando - 2011 - Continent 1 (3):224-228.
    On 22 July, 2011, we were confronted with the horror of the actions of Anders Behring Breivik. The instant reaction, as we have seen with similar incidents in the past—such as the Oklahoma City bombings—was to attempt to explain the incident. Whether the reasons given were true or not were irrelevant: the fact that there was a reason was better than if there were none. We should not dismiss those that continue to cling on to the initial claims of a (...)
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  43.  7
    Undocumented Immigrants, Healthcare, and the Language of Desert.Bertha Alvarez Manninen - 2020 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):19-30.
    Arguments both in favor and against including undocumented immigrants in healthcare reform abound. However, many of these arguments, including ones that are favorable towards immigrants, are ethically problematic, and for the same reason; namely, that they either support or deny the inclusion of undocumented immigrants in healthcare reform based on their perceived level of desert, due to their alleged contribution to our social utility, or lack thereof. This encourages gauging the lives and worth of undocumented immigrants in terms of their (...)
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  44. Beyond the Chilly Climate: The Salience of Gender in Women’s Academic Careers.Dana M. Britton - 2017 - Gender and Society 31 (1):5-27.
    The prevailing metaphor for understanding the persistence of gender inequalities in universities is the “chilly climate.” Women faculty sometimes resist descriptions of their workplaces as “chilly” and deny that gender matters even in the face of considerable evidence to the contrary. I draw on interviews with women academics to explore this apparent paradox, and I offer a theoretical synthesis that may help explain it. I build on insights from Ridgeway and Acker to demonstrate that women do experience gender at work, (...)
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  45.  20
    Self–Other Relations and the Rationality of Cultures.Paul Healy - 2000 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 26 (6):61-83.
    As attested by Taylor, Calhoun and others, recognition is central to (cultural) identity and to a related sense of self-worth. In contrast, by denying the comparable worth of other cultures, non-recognition represents a potentially damaging mode of intercultural relations. Although not widely acknowledged, a related consideration has been at issue in the rationality debate, initiated by Peter Winch, throughout its several phases. Briefly stated, the problem is that the polarized alternatives of ethnocentric universalism and self-sealing relativism that have characterized this (...)
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  46.  39
    Philosophy and Politics, I.Victor Gourevitch - 1968 - Review of Metaphysics 22 (1):58 - 84.
    On the face of it, On Tyranny is a straightforward commentary on Xenophon's dialogue Hiero or Tyrannicus. As such it is a very model of thoroughness and learning. It amply repays careful study, and it goes a long way toward explaining Strauss's influence in training a generation of scholars. The dialogue proper takes up just under 20 pages. Its analysis runs to 90-odd pages, followed by another 30 pages of tightly packed notes that are largely devoted to parallels between the (...)
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  47.  21
    Current Controversies in Philosophy of Religion.Paul Draper - 2017 - New York and London: Routledge.
    The main focus of this book is on philosophy of religion-in-general instead of on the philosophy of a particular religion or family of religions. For example, in the first of four main parts of the book, J. L. Schellenberg and Robert McKim write chapters on future progress in religion. Hopefully, their efforts will jump-start work in the field on this important but neglected topic. The next part of the book (as well as the book's final chapter) addresses the issue of (...)
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  48. Truths Are Valuable, Truth Isn't.Alexander auf der Straße - 2013 - Abstracta 7 (2):3-17.
    This paper deals with the relationship that is sometimes said to hold between true beliefs and success. It argues for deflationism about truth. In particular, a position will be defended according to which the instrumental value of true beliefs can be accounted for within a deflationary framework. The paper denies that truth has any non-instrumental value in the sense that truth is pursued for its own sake. Moreover, the instrumental value of true beliefs will be explained in terms of psychological (...)
     
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  49. Distributive Justice in Aristotle's Ethics and Politics.David Keyt - 1985 - Topoi 4 (1):23-45.
    The symbolism introduced earlier provides a convenient vehicle for examining the status and consistency of Aristotle's three diverse justifications and for explaining how he means to avoid Protagorean relativism without embracing Platonic absolutism. When the variables ‘ x ’ and ‘ y ’ are allowed to range over the groups of free men in a given polis as well as over individual free men, the formula for the Aristotelian conception of justice expresses the major premiss of Aristotle's three justifications: (1) (...)
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  50. Group Membership and Morally Risky Epistemic Conditions.Anna Moltchanova - 2008 - Social Philosophy Today 24:53-67.
    Johann Gottlieb Fichte argues that one semantic presupposition of claims about our entitlements is the idea that others are capable of autonomy. Individuals cannot demand anything from others, even submission, unless they also presuppose—although perhaps without acknowledging this to themselves—that others are free agents. Thus, the autonomy of others is a pre-condition of our exercise of autonomy. Why do individuals and groups often try to justify their own entitlement to rights at the expense of the freedom of others, thereby simultaneously (...)
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