Results for 'Delon Human'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Meaning in the Lives of Humans and Other Animals.Duncan Purves & Nicolas Delon - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (2):317-338.
    This paper argues that contemporary philosophical literature on meaning in life has important implications for the debate about our obligations to non-human animals. If animal lives can be meaningful, then practices including factory farming and animal research might be morally worse than ethicists have thought. We argue for two theses about meaning in life: that the best account of meaningful lives must take intentional action to be necessary for meaning—an individual’s life has meaning if and only if the individual (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  2.  65
    Conflicts of Interest in Science and Medicine: The Physician’s Perspective.Delon Human - 2002 - Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):273-276.
    The various statements and declarations of the World Medical Association that address conflicts of interest on the part of physicians as (1) researchers, and (2) practitioners, are examined, with particular reference to the October 2000 revision of the Declaration of Helsinki. Recent contributions to the literature, notably on conflicts of interest in medical research, are noted. Finally, key provisions of the American Medical Association’s Code of Medical Ethics (2000–2001 Edition) that address the various forms of conflict of interest that can (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Valuing Humane Lives in Two-Level Utilitarianism.Nicolas Delon - 2020 - Utilitas 32 (3):276-293.
    I examine the two-level utilitarian case for humane animal agriculture (by R. M. Hare and Gary Varner) and argue that it fails on its own terms. The case states that, at the ‘intuitive level’ of moral thinking, we can justify raising and killing animals for food, regarding them as replaceable, while treating them with respect. I show that two-level utilitarianism supports, instead, alternatives to animal agriculture. First, the case for humane animal agriculture does not follow from a commitment to two-level (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Pervasive Captivity and Urban Wildlife.Nicolas Delon - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (2):123-143.
    Urban animals can benefit from living in cities, but this also makes them vulnerable as they increasingly depend on the advantages of urban life. This article has two aims. First, I provide a detailed analysis of the concept of captivity and explain why it matters to nonhuman animals—because and insofar as many of them have a (non-substitutable) interest in freedom. Second, I defend a surprising implication of the account—pushing the boundaries of the concept while the boundaries of cities and (...) activities expand. I argue for the existence of the neglected problem of pervasive captivity, of which urban wildlife is an illustration. Many urban animals are confined, controlled and dependent, therefore often captive of expanding urban areas. While I argue that captivity per se is value-neutral, I draw the ethical and policy implications of harmful pervasive captivity. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  5. Animal Agency, Captivity, and Meaning.Nicolas Delon - 2018 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 25:127-146.
    Can animals be agents? Do they want to be free? Can they have meaningful lives? If so, should we change the way we treat them? This paper offers an account of animal agency and of two continuums: between human and nonhuman agency, and between wildness and captivity. It describes how a wide range of human activities impede on animals’ freedom and argues that, in doing so, we deprive a wide range of animals of opportunities to exercise their agency (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  6. Animal Capabilities and Freedom in the City.Nicolas Delon - 2021 - Journal of Human Development and Capabilities 22 (1):131-153.
    Animals who live in cities must coexist with us. They are, as a result, entitled to the conditions of their flourishing. This article argues that, as the boundaries of cities and urban areas expand, the boundaries of our conception of captivity should expand too. Urbanization can undermine animals’ freedoms, hence their ability to live good lives. I draw the implications of an account of “pervasive captivity” against the background of the Capabilities Approach. I construe captivity, including that of urban animals, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Consider the Agent in the Arthropod.Nicolas Delon, Peter Cook, Gordon Bauer & Heidi Harley - 2020 - Animal Sentience 29 (32).
    —Commentary on Mikhalevich and Powell on invertebrate minds.— Whether or not arthropods are sentient, they can have moral standing. Appeals to sentience are not necessary and retard progress in human treatment of other species, including invertebrates. Other increasingly well-documented aspects of invertebrate minds are pertinent to their welfare. Even if arthropods are not sentient, they can be agents whose goals—and therefore interests—can be frustrated. This kind of agency is sufficient for moral status and requires that we consider their welfare.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  79
    Animal Consciousness.Pierre Le Neindre, Emilie Bernard, Alain Boissy, Xavier Boivin, Ludovic Calandreau, Nicolas Delon, Bertrand Deputte, Sonia Desmoulin-Canselier, Muriel Dunier, Nathan Faivre, Martin Giurfa, Jean-Luc Guichet, Léa Lansade, Raphaël Larrère, Pierre Mormède, Patrick Prunet, Benoist Schaal, Jacques Servière & Claudia Terlouw - 2017 - EFSA Supporting Publication 14 (4).
    After reviewing the literature on current knowledge about consciousness in humans, we present a state-of-the art discussion on consciousness and related key concepts in animals. Obviously much fewer publications are available on non-human species than on humans, most of them relating to laboratory or wild animal species, and only few to livestock species. Human consciousness is by definition subjective and private. Animal consciousness is usually assessed through behavioural performance. Behaviour involves a wide array of cognitive processes that have (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9. The Meaning of Animal Labour.Nicolas Delon - 2020 - In Charlotte Blattner, Kendra Coulter & Will Kymlicka (eds.), Animal Labour: A New Frontier of Interspecies Justice? Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 160-180.
    Proponents of humane or traditional husbandry, in contrast to factory farming, often argue that maintaining meaningful relationships with animals entails working with them. Accordingly, they argue that animal liberation is misguided, since it appears to entail erasing our relationships to animals and depriving both us and them of valuable opportunities to live together. This chapter offers a critical examination of defense of animal husbandry based on the value of labour, in particular the view that farm animals could be seen as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Handicap et animaux.Nicolas Delon - 2012 - In Sandra Laugier (ed.), Tous vulnérables ? Le care, les animaux et l'environnement. Payot-Rivages. pp. 99-121.
    This paper addresses issues in comparing nonhuman animals and severely disabled human beings in terms of their morally relevant characteristics. Through a discussion of the works of Jeff McMahan, Eva Feder Kittay and Martha Nussbaum, the paper offers a defense of the importance and possibility of extending care and compassion to nonhumans without collapsing relevant species differences.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Une théorie morale peut-elle être cognitivement trop exigeante?Nicolas Delon - 2015 - Implications Philosophiques.
    Starting from the typical case of utilitarianism, I distinguish three ways a moral theory may be deemed (over-)demanding: practical, epistemic, and cognitive. I focus on the latter, whose specific nature has been overlooked. Taking animal ethics as a case study, I argue that knowledge of human cognition is critical to spelling out moral theories (including their implications) that are accessible and acceptable to the greatest number of agents. In a nutshell: knowing more about our cognitive apparatus with a view (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  16
    Topological Modification of Brain Networks Organization in Children With High Intelligence Quotient: A Resting-State fMRI Study.Ilaria Suprano, Chantal Delon-Martin, Gabriel Kocevar, Claudio Stamile, Salem Hannoun, Sophie Achard, Amanpreet Badhwar, Pierre Fourneret, Olivier Revol, Fanny Nusbaum & Dominique Sappey-Marinier - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  13.  2
    Corrigendum: Topological Modification of Brain Networks Organization in Children With High Intelligence Quotient: A Resting-State fMRI Study.Ilaria Suprano, Chantal Delon-Martin, Gabriel Kocevar, Claudio Stamile, Salem Hannoun, Sophie Achard, Amanpreet Badhwar, Pierre Fourneret, Olivier Revol, Fanny Nusbaum & Dominique Sappey-Marinier - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  14.  16
    L’animal d’élevage compagnon de travail. L’éthique des fables alimentaires.Nicolas Delon - 2017 - Revue Française d'Éthique Appliquée 2 (4).
    Jocelyne Porcher sets out to “reinvent” our relationship to animals in order to better “live with” them. This article provides a critical examination of her thesis that farm animals can be seen as proper workers, in a sense that precludes the sort of unjust exploitation that she ascribes to factory farming. Contrary to Porcher, the article considers relationships between humans and domesticated species which do not entail killing or even work for food production purposes. The present critique focuses on the (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  45
    Can Only Human Lives Be Meaningful?Joshua Lewis Thomas - 2018 - Philosophical Papers 47 (2):265-297.
    Duncan Purves and Nicolas Delon have argued that one’s life will be meaningful to the extent that one contributes to valuable states of affairs and this contribution is a result of one’s intentional actions. They then argue, contrary to some theorists’ intuitions, that non-human animals are capable of fulfilling these requirements, and that this finding might entail important things for the animal ethics movement. In this paper, I also argue that things besides human beings can have meaningful (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  16. The Replaceability Argument in the Ethics of Animal Husbandry.Nicolas Delon - 2016 - Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics.
    Most people agree that inflicting unnecessary suffering upon animals is wrong. Many fewer people, including among ethicists, agree that painlessly killing animals is necessarily wrong. The most commonly cited reason is that death (without pain, fear, distress) is not bad for them in a way that matters morally, or not as significantly as it does for persons, who are self-conscious, make long-term plans and have preferences about their own future. Animals, at least those that are not persons, lack a morally (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  17.  20
    Une Fonction de Kolchin Pour les Corps Imparfaits de Degré d'Imperfection Fini.Françoise Delon - 2005 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 70 (2):664 - 680.
    Non-perfect separably closed fields are stable, and not superstable. As a result, not all types can be ranked. We develop here a new tool, a "semi-rank", which takes values in the non-negative reals, and gives a sufficient condition for forking of types. This semi-rank is built up from a transcendence function, analogous to the one considered by Kolchin in the context of differentially closed fields. It yields some orthogonality and stratification results. /// Un corps séparablement clos non algébriquement clos est (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Wild Animal Suffering is Intractable.Nicolas Delon & Duncan Purves - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (2):239-260.
    Most people believe that suffering is intrinsically bad. In conjunction with facts about our world and plausible moral principles, this yields a pro tanto obligation to reduce suffering. This is the intuitive starting point for the moral argument in favor of interventions to prevent wild animal suffering. If we accept the moral principle that we ought, pro tanto, to reduce the suffering of all sentient creatures, and we recognize the prevalence of suffering in the wild, then we seem committed to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  19.  6
    Human Rights as Politics and Idolatry.Michael Ignatieff (ed.) - 2001 - Princeton University Press.
    Michael Ignatieff draws on his extensive experience as a writer and commentator on world affairs to present a penetrating account of the successes, failures, and prospects of the human rights revolution. Since the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, this revolution has brought the world moral progress and broken the nation-state's monopoly on the conduct of international affairs. But it has also faced challenges. Ignatieff argues that human rights activists have rightly drawn (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   73 citations  
  20. Strangers to Ourselves: A Nietzschean Challenge to the Badness of Suffering.Nicolas Delon - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    Is suffering really bad? The late Derek Parfit argued that we all have reasons to want to avoid future agony and that suffering is in itself bad both for the one who suffers and impersonally. Nietzsche denied that suffering was intrinsically bad and that its value could even be impersonal. This paper has two aims. It argues against what I call ‘Realism about the Value of Suffering’ by drawing from a broadly Nietzschean debunking of our evaluative attitudes, showing that a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. Minimal Groups in Separably Closed Fields.E. Bouscaren & F. Delon - 2002 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 67 (1):239-259.
    We give a complete description of minimal groups infinitely definable in separably closed fields of finite degree of imperfection. In particular we answer positively the question of the existence of such a group with infinite transcendence degree (i.e., a minimal group with non thin generic).
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  22.  31
    Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Limits.Bertrand Russell - 1948 - New York, USA: Simon and Schuster.
    How do we know what we "know"? How did we –as individuals and as a society – come to accept certain knowledge as fact? In _Human Knowledge,_ Bertrand Russell questions the reliability of our assumptions on knowledge. This brilliant and controversial work investigates the relationship between ‘individual’ and ‘scientific’ knowledge. First published in 1948, this provocative work contributed significantly to an explosive intellectual discourse that continues to this day.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   205 citations  
  23.  48
    Studying Human Behavior: How Scientists Investigate Aggression and Sexuality.Helen E. Longino - 2013 - University of Chicago Press.
    In Studying Human Behavior, Helen E. Longino enters into the complexities of human behavioral research, a domain still dominated by the age-old debate of “nature versus nurture.” Rather than supporting one side or another or attempting..
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   66 citations  
  24. Directed Duties and Nonhuman Personhood.Nicolas Delon - manuscript
    [DRAFT / no longer under review / getting messy / feedback welcome ] This paper defends a relational account of personhood. I argue that the structure of personhood consists of dyadic relations between persons who can wrong or be wronged by one another, even if some of them lack moral competence. I draw on recent work on directed duties to outline the structure of moral communities of persons. The upshot is that we can construct an inclusive theory of personhood that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  4
    Definable Types in Algebraically Closed Valued Fields.Pablo Cubides Kovacsics & Françoise Delon - 2016 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 62 (1-2):35-45.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Human Rights in Chinese Thought: A Cross-Cultural Inquiry.Stephen C. Angle - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    What should we make of claims by members of other groups to have moralities different from our own? Human Rights in Chinese Thought gives an extended answer to this question in the first study of its kind. It integrates a full account of the development of Chinese rights discourse - reaching back to important, though neglected, origins of that discourse in 17th and 18th century Confucianism - with philosophical consideration of how various communities should respond to contemporary Chinese claims (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  27. Le problème de la souffrance chez Nietzsche et Parfit.Nicolas Delon - 2019 - Klesis 43:156-186.
    Dans On What Matters Parfit défénd un objectivisme moral sur lequel il espère que les philosophes finiront par converger. Au cœur de cet espoir sont des vérités normatives irréductibles telles que l’affirmation que la souffrance est intrinsèquement mauvaise. Parfit se demande si Nietzsche menace son édifice et lui consacre un chapitre entier chapeautant la discussion du désaccord moral et de la convergence, et conclut que Nietzsche soit n’est pas en vrai désaccord, soit ne raisonne pas dans des conditions satisfaisantes. Je (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28.  24
    Human Rights as Technologies of the Self: Creating the European Governmentable Subject of Rights.Chapter11 Human - 2012 - In Ben Golder (ed.), Re-Reading Foucault: On Law, Power and Rights. Routledge. pp. 229.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  44
    Humanity’s End: Why We Should Reject Radical Enhancement.Nicholas Agar - 2010 - Bradford.
    Proposals to make us smarter than the greatest geniuses or to add thousands of years to our life spans seem fit only for the spam folder or trash can. And yet this is what contemporary advocates of radical enhancement offer in all seriousness. They present a variety of technologies and therapies that will expand our capacities far beyond what is currently possible for human beings. In _Humanity's End,_ Nicholas Agar argues against radical enhancement, describing its destructive consequences. Agar examines (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   56 citations  
  30.  77
    Origins of Human Communication.Michael Tomasello - 2008 - MIT Press.
    In this original and provocative account of the evolutionary origins of human communication, Michael Tomasello connects the fundamentally cooperative structure of human communication (initially discovered by Paul Grice) to the especially ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   311 citations  
  31. Against Moral Intrinsicalism.Nicolas Delon - 2015 - In Elisa Aaltola & John Hadley (eds.), Animal Ethics and Philosophy: Questioning the Orthodoxy. London: Rowman and Littlefield International. pp. 31-45.
    This paper challenges a widespread, if tacit, assumption of animal ethics, namely, that the only properties of entities that matter to their moral status are intrinsic, cross‐specific properties—typically psychological capacities. According to moral individualism (Rachels 1990; McMahan 2002; 2005), the moral status of an individual, and how to treat him or her, should only be a function of his or her individual properties. I focus on the fundamental assumption of moral individualism, which I call intrinsicalism. On the challenged view, pigs, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32. Social Norms and Farm Animal Protection.Nicolas Delon - 2018 - Palgrave Communications 4:1-6.
    Social change is slow and difficult. Social change for animals is formidably slow and difficult. Advocates and scholars alike have long tried to change attitudes and convince the public that eating animals is wrong. The topic of norms and social change for animals has been neglected, which explains in part the relative failure of the animal protection movement to secure robust support reflected in social and legal norms. Moreover, animal ethics has suffered from a disproportionate focus on individual attitudes and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  3
    Better Humans?: Understanding the Enhancement Project.Michael Hauskeller - 2013 - Routledge.
    Developments in medical science have afforded us the opportunity to improve and enhance the human species in ways unthinkable to previous generations. Whether it's making changes to mitochondrial DNA in a human egg, being prescribed Prozac, or having a facelift, our desire to live longer, feel better and look good has presented philosophers, medical practitioners and policy-makers with considerable ethical challenges. But what exactly constitutes human improvement? What do we mean when we talk of making "better" humans? (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  34.  1
    Definable Completeness of P-Minimal Fields and Applications.Pablo Cubides Kovacsics & Françoise Delon - 2022 - Journal of Mathematical Logic 22 (2).
    We show that every definable nested family of closed and bounded subsets of a P-minimal field K has nonempty intersection. As an application we answer a question of Darnière and Halupczok showing t...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  12
    Ruth Amossy et Michel Delon (eds.), Critique et légitimité du préjugé (XVIIIe–XXe siècle). Collection de philosophie politique et juridique. [REVIEW]Cornelia Ilie - 2000 - Argumentation 14 (4):480-485.
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  4
    Human Genetics Commission Calls for Tougher Rules on Use and Storage of Genetic Data.Human Genetics Commission - 2003 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 9 (1):3.
  37. Moral Status, Final Value, and Extrinsic Properties.Nicolas Delon - 2014 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 114 (3pt3):371-379.
    Starting from a distinction between intrinsic and final value, I explore the implications of the supervenience of final value on extrinsic properties regarding moral status. I make a case for ‘extrinsic moral status’ based on ‘extrinsic final value’. I show that the assumption of ‘moral individualism’, that moral status supervenes merely on intrinsic properties, is misguided, and results from a conflation of intrinsic with final value. I argue that at least one extrinsic property, namely vulnerability, can be the basis of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38. Un Singer peut-il en remplacer un autre ?Nicolas Delon - 2016 - Klesis 32:150-190.
    In the third edition of ‘Practical Ethics’ (2011), Peter Singer reexamines the so-called “replaceability argument,” according to which merely sentient beings, as opposed to persons (self-conscious and with a robust sense of time), are replaceable—it is in principle permissible to kill them provided that they live pleasant lives that they would not have had otherwise and that they be replaced by equally happy beings. On this view, existence is a benefit and death is not a harm. Singer’s challenge is to (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39.  51
    Human Capacities and Moral Status.Russell DiSilvestro - 2010 - Springer.
    Many debates about the moral status of things—for example, debates about the natural rights of human fetuses or nonhuman animals—eventually migrate towards a discussion of the capacities of the things in question—for example, their capacities to feel pain, think, or love. Yet the move towards capacities is often controversial: if a human’s capacities are the basis of its moral status, how could a human having lesser capacities than you and I have the same "serious" moral status as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  40.  2
    The Human Microbiome: Ethical, Legal and Social Concerns.Rosamond Rhodes, Nada Gligorov & Abraham Paul Schwab (eds.) - 2013 - Oxford university press.
    Human microbiome research has revealed that legions of bacteria, viruses, and fungi live on our skin and within the cavities of our bodies. New knowledge from these recent studies shows that humans are superorganisms and that the microbiome is indispensible to our lives and our health. This volume explores some of the science on the human microbiome and considers the ethical, legal, and social concerns that are raised by this research.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  41. Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach.Martha C. Nussbaum - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this major book Martha Nussbaum, one of the most innovative and influential philosophical voices of our time, proposes a kind of feminism that is genuinely international, argues for an ethical underpinning to all thought about development planning and public policy, and dramatically moves beyond the abstractions of economists and philosophers to embed thought about justice in the concrete reality of the struggles of poor women. Nussbaum argues that international political and economic thought must be sensitive to gender difference as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   480 citations  
  42.  5
    Human Encounters in the Social World.Aron Gurwitsch - 1979 - Duquesne University Press.
  43.  29
    Human Dignity, Human Rights, and Responsibility: The New Language of Global Bioethics and Biolaw.Yechiel Michael Barilan - 2012 - MIT Press.
    "Human dignity" has been enshrined in international agreements and national constitutions as a fundamental human right. The World Medical Association calls on physicians to respect human dignity and to discharge their duties with dignity. And yet human dignity is a term--like love, hope, and justice--that is intuitively grasped but never clearly defined. Some ethicists and bioethicists dismiss it; other thinkers point to its use in the service of particular ideologies. In this book, Michael Barilan offers an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  44. Human Nature and Conduct: An Introduction to Social Psychology.John Dewey - 1922 - Henry Holt.
    In Human Nature and Conduct, first published in 1922, Dewey brings the rigor of natural sciences to the quest for a better moral system.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   213 citations  
  45. Climate Change, Human Rights and Moral Thresholds.Simon Caney - 2010 - In Stephen Humphreys (ed.), Human Rights and Climate Change. Cambridge University Press. pp. 69-90..
    This essay examines the relationship between climate change and human rights. It argues that climate change is unjust, in part, because it jeopardizes several core rights – including the right to life, the right to food and the right to health. It then argues that adopting a human rights framework has six implications for climate policies. To give some examples, it argues that this helps us to understand the concept of “dangerous anthropogenic interference” (UNFCCC, Article 2). In addition (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  46.  22
    Human Rights as Politics and Idolatry.Michael Ignatieff, Kwame Anthony Appiah, David A. Hollinger, Thomas W. Laqueur & Diane F. Orentlicher - 2001 - Princeton University Press.
    "These essays make a splendid book. Ignatieff's lectures are engaging and vigorous; they also combine some rather striking ideas with savvy perceptions about actual domestic and international politics.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  47. On Human Rights.James Griffin - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    It is our job now - the job of this book - to influence and develop the unsettled discourse of human rights so as to complete the incomplete idea.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   157 citations  
  48. Humanity 2.Steve Fuller - 2011 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
  49.  91
    Hiding From Humanity: Disgust, Shame, and the Law.Martha C. Nussbaum - 2004 - Princeton University Press.
    Should laws about sex and pornography be based on social conventions about what is disgusting? Should felons be required to display bumper stickers or wear T-shirts that announce their crimes? This powerful and elegantly written book, by one of America's most influential philosophers, presents a critique of the role that shame and disgust play in our individual and social lives and, in particular, in the law.Martha Nussbaum argues that we should be wary of these emotions because they are associated in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   180 citations  
  50.  21
    Wild Animal Ethics: Well-Being, Agency, and Freedom.Nicolas Delon - 2021 - Philosophia 50 (3):875-885.
    Commentary on Kyle Johannsen, Wild Animal Ethics (Routledge, 2020). I want to unpack what we should understand by wild animal well-being, and how different interpretations of what matters about it shape the sorts of interventions we endorse. I will not offer a theory of wild animal well-being or even take a stance on the best approach to theories of well-being as they pertain to wild animals. My aim is to bring into view a concern that WAE has largely overlooked: agency (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000