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  1.  16
    Preferences Regarding Return of Genomic Results to Relatives of Research Participants, Including After Participant Death: Empirical Results From a Cancer Biobank.Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan M. Wolf, Kari G. Chaffee, Marguerite E. Robinson, Deborah R. Gordon, Noralane M. Lindor & Barbara A. Koenig - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):464-475.
    Data are lacking with regard to participants' perspectives on return of genetic research results to relatives, including after the participant's death. This paper reports descriptive results from 3,630 survey respondents: 464 participants in a pancreatic cancer biobank, 1,439 family registry participants, and 1,727 healthy individuals. Our findings indicate that most participants would feel obligated to share their results with blood relatives while alive and would want results to be shared with relatives after their death.
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  2.  14
    Should Researchers Offer Results to Family Members of Cancer Biobank Participants? A Mixed-Methods Study of Proband and Family Preferences.Deborah R. Gordon, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Marguerite Robinson, Wesley O. Petersen, Jason S. Egginton, Kari G. Chaffee, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan M. Wolf & Barbara A. Koenig - 2019 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 10 (1):1-22.
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  3.  17
    Beyond Pathologizing Harm: Understanding PTSD in the Context of War Experience.Patricia Benner, Jodi Halpern, Deborah R. Gordon, Catherine Long Popell & Patricia W. Kelley - 2018 - Journal of Medical Humanities 39 (1):45-72.
    An alternative to objectifying approaches to understanding Post-traumatic Stress Disorder grounded in hermeneutic phenomenology is presented. Nurses who provided care for soldiers injured in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, and sixty-seven wounded male servicemen in the rehabilitation phase of their recovery were interviewed. PTSD is the one major psychiatric diagnosis where social causation is established, yet PTSD is predominantly viewed in terms of the usual neuro-physiological causal models with traumatic social events viewed as pathogens with dose related effects. Biologic models (...)
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