Results for 'Deborah House'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  18
    Deborah E. Harkness. The Jewel House: Elizabethan London and the Scientific Revolution. Xviii + 348 Pp., Illus., Figs., Bibl., Index. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 2007. $32.50. [REVIEW]Penelope Gouk - 2008 - Isis 99 (2):395-397.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  15
    Deborah E. Harkness, The Jewel House: Elizabethan London and the Scientific Revolution. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007. Pp. Xviii+349. ISBN 978-0-300-11196-5. £19.99. [REVIEW]Sophie Weeks - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Science 42 (1):133.
  3. The Treasure House of the Mind: Descartes' Conception of Innate Ideas.Deborah A. Boyle - 1999 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    Descartes is often accused of lacking a coherent conception of innate ideas. I argue that Descartes' remarks on innate ideas actually form a unified account. "Innate idea" is triply ambiguous, but its three meanings are interdependent. "Innate idea" can mean an act of perceiving; that which is perceived; or a faculty, capacity, or disposition to have certain ideas. An innate idea qua object of thought is some thing existing objectively , which we have a capacity to perceive, but which we (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Cultural Collision, Africanity, and the Black Baptist Preacher In Jonah's Gourd Vine and In My Father's House.Deborah Plant - 1995 - Griot 14:10-17.
  5.  2
    The Great Good Place: The Country House & English Literature.Deborah O. Collins - 1994 - History of European Ideas 18 (6):1018-1019.
  6.  25
    Pet Ownership and Adults' Views on the Use of Animals.Deborah L. Wells & Peter G. Hepper - 1997 - Society and Animals 5 (1):45-63.
    Four hundred and twenty-two adults completed a postal questionnaire in which they provided information regarding pet ownership and their attitudes toward 13 issues involving the use of animals. Over 63% of the sample owned a household pet, with the dog being the most common. Household pets were more commonly owned by respondents who were married, younger than 65 years of age, living in detached houses, or with a child/children present in the home. Most concern was expressed toward those types of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  7.  26
    Diverting Demons: Ritual, Poetic Mockery and the Odysseus-Iros Encounter.Deborah Steiner - 2009 - Classical Antiquity 28 (1):71-100.
    This article treats the verbal and physical altercation between the disguised Odysseus and the local beggar Iros at the start of Odyssey 18 and explores the overlapping ritual and generic aspects of the encounter so as to account for many of its otherwise puzzling features. Beginning with the detailed characterization of Iros at the book's start, I demonstrate how the poet assigns to the parasite properties and modes of behavior that have close analogues in later descriptions of pharmakoi and of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Sixty Years on Deborah Evans.Deborah Evans - 2009 - In B. P. O'Donohoe & R. O. Elveton (eds.), Sartre's Second Century. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 73.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Review of Deborah Achtenberg's Cognition of Value in Aristotle's Ethics: Promise of Enrichment, Threat of Destruction. [REVIEW]Deborah Achtenberg - 2004 - Philosophical Quarterly 54 (216):465-468.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. Samuel Hellman and Deborah S. Hellman.Deborah S. Hellman - 1994 - Contemporary Issues in Bioethics 324:163.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Book Excerpt: Computer Ethics, Second Edition by Deborah G. Johnson.Deborah G. Johnson - 1993 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 23 (3-4):10-14.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  62
    Book Excerpt: Computer Ethics, by Deborah G. Johnson (Prentice Hall, 1994).Deborah G. Johnson - 1993 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 23 (3-4):10-14.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  12
    Groups as Agents.Deborah Tollefsen - 2015 - Polity.
    In the social sciences and in everyday speech we often talk about groups as if they behaved in the same way as individuals, thinking and acting as a singular being. We say for example that "Google intends to develop an automated car", "the U.S. Government believes that Syria has used chemical weapons on its people", or that "the NRA wants to protect the rights of gun owners". We also often ascribe legal and moral responsibility to groups. But could groups literally (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   59 citations  
  14. Dalle case popolari al Social Housing. Successi e miserie delle politiche sociali per la casa in Italia.From Council Housing - forthcoming - Techne.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  1
    Error and the Growth of Experimental Knowledge.Deborah G. Mayo - 1996 - University of Chicago.
    This text provides a critique of the subjective Bayesian view of statistical inference, and proposes the author's own error-statistical approach as an alternative framework for the epistemology of experiment. It seeks to address the needs of researchers who work with statistical analysis.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   183 citations  
  16. .Deborah Talmi & Chris D. Frith - 2011
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   63 citations  
  17. Error and the Growth of Experimental Knowledge.Deborah Mayo - 1996 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (1):455-459.
  18.  30
    Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection.Deborah Linderman, Julia Kristeva & Leon S. Roudiez - 1984 - Substance 13 (3/4):140.
  19. Collective Intentionality and the Social Sciences.Deborah Perron Tollefsen - 2002 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 32 (1):25-50.
    In everyday discourse and in the context of social scientific research we often attribute intentional states to groups. Contemporary approaches to group intentionality have either dismissed these attributions as metaphorical or provided an analysis of our attributions in terms of the intentional states of individuals in the group.Insection1, the author argues that these approaches are problematic. In sections 2 and 3, the author defends the view that certain groups are literally intentional agents. In section 4, the author argues that there (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   57 citations  
  20. Let’s Pretend!: Children and Joint Action.Deborah Tollefsen - 2005 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (1):75-97.
    According to many, joint intentional action must be understood in terms of joint intentions. Most accounts of joint intention appeal to a set of sophisticated individual intentional states. The author argues that standard accounts of joint intention exclude the possibility of joint action in young children because they presuppose that the participants have a robust theory of mind, something young children lack. But young children do engage in joint action. The author offers a revision of Michael Bratman’s analysis of joint (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  21. From Extended Mind to Collective Mind.Deborah Tollefsen - 2006 - Cognitive Systems Research 7 (2):140-150.
  22. Error and the Growth of Experimental Knowledge.Deborah Mayo - 1997 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (3):455-459.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   190 citations  
  23.  23
    Let’s Pretend!: Children and Joint Action.Deborah Tollefsen - 2005 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (1):75-97.
    According to many, joint intentional action must be understood in terms of joint intentions. Most accounts of joint intention appeal to a set of sophisticated individual intentional states. The author argues that standard accounts of joint intention exclude the possibility of joint action in young children because they presuppose that the participants have a robust theory of mind, something young children lack. But young children do engage in joint action. The author offers a revision of Michael Bratman’s analysis of joint (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  24. Naturalizing Joint Action: A Process-Based Approach.Deborah Tollefsen & Rick Dale - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (3):385-407.
    Numerous philosophical theories of joint agency and its intentional structure have been developed in the past few decades. These theories have offered accounts of joint agency that appeal to higher-level states that are?shared? in some way. These accounts have enhanced our understanding of joint agency, yet there are a number of lower-level cognitive phenomena involved in joint action that philosophers rarely acknowledge. In particular, empirical research in cognitive science has revealed that when individuals engage in a joint activity such as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  25.  81
    Aristotle’s Theory of Language and Meaning.Deborah K. W. Modrak - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book about Aristotle's philosophy of language, interpreted in a framework that provides a comprehensive interpretation of Aristotle's metaphysics, philosophy of mind, epistemology and science. The aim of the book is to explicate the description of meaning contained in De Interpretatione and to show the relevance of that theory of meaning to much of the rest of Aristotle's philosophy. In the process Deborah Modrak reveals how that theory of meaning has been much maligned. This is a major (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  26.  54
    The Human Function Compunction: Teleological Explanation in Adults.Deborah Kelemen & Evelyn Rosset - 2009 - Cognition 111 (1):138-143.
    Research has found that children possess a broad bias in favor of teleological - or purpose-based - explanations of natural phenomena. The current two experiments explored whether adults implicitly possess a similar bias. In Study 1, undergraduates judged a series of statements as "good" or "bad" explanations for why different phenomena occur. Judgments occurred in one of three conditions: fast speeded, moderately speeded, or unspeeded. Participants in speeded conditions judged significantly more scientifically unwarranted teleological explanations as correct, but were not (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   81 citations  
  27.  62
    Differences in the Perceptions of Moral Intensity in the Moral Decision Process: An Empirical Examination of Accounting Students. [REVIEW]Deborah L. Leitsch - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 53 (3):313-323.
    The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the impact of moral issues on the moral decision-making process within the field of accounting. In particular, the study examined differences in the perceptions of the underlying characteristics of moral issues on the specific steps of the moral decision-making process of four different accounting situations.The research results suggested that student's perception of the components of moral intensity as well as the various stages of the moral decision-making process was (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  28.  91
    Aristotle: The Power of Perception.DEBORAH K. W. MODRAK - 1987 - University of Chicago Press.
  29.  81
    Descartes and the Passionate Mind.Deborah J. Brown - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Descartes is often accused of having fragmented the human being into two independent substances, mind and body, with no clear strategy for explaining the apparent unity of human experience. Deborah Brown argues that, contrary to this view, Descartes did in fact have a conception of a single, integrated human being, and that in his view this conception is crucial to the success of human beings as rational and moral agents and as practitioners of science. The passions are pivotal in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  30. Computer Systems: Moral Entities but Not Moral Agents. [REVIEW]Deborah G. Johnson - 2006 - Ethics and Information Technology 8 (4):195-204.
    After discussing the distinction between artifacts and natural entities, and the distinction between artifacts and technology, the conditions of the traditional account of moral agency are identified. While computer system behavior meets four of the five conditions, it does not and cannot meet a key condition. Computer systems do not have mental states, and even if they could be construed as having mental states, they do not have intendings to act, which arise from an agent’s freedom. On the other hand, (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   58 citations  
  31.  11
    Professional Physical Scientists Display Tenacious Teleological Tendencies: Purpose-Based Reasoning as a Cognitive Default.Deborah Kelemen, Joshua Rottman & Rebecca Seston - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (4):1074-1083.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   59 citations  
  32. Severe Testing as a Basic Concept in a Neyman–Pearson Philosophy of Induction.Deborah G. Mayo & Aris Spanos - 2006 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (2):323-357.
    Despite the widespread use of key concepts of the Neyman–Pearson (N–P) statistical paradigm—type I and II errors, significance levels, power, confidence levels—they have been the subject of philosophical controversy and debate for over 60 years. Both current and long-standing problems of N–P tests stem from unclarity and confusion, even among N–P adherents, as to how a test's (pre-data) error probabilities are to be used for (post-data) inductive inference as opposed to inductive behavior. We argue that the relevance of error probabilities (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   52 citations  
  33. Epistemic Reactive Attitudes.Deborah Perron Tollefsen - 2017 - American Philosophical Quarterly 54 (4):353-366.
    Although there have been a number of recent discussions about the emotions that we bring with us to our epistemic endeavors, there has been little, if any, discussion of the emotions we bring with us to epistemic appraisal. This paper focuses on a particular set of emotions, the reactive attitudes. As Peter F. Strawson and others have argued, our reactive attitudes reveal something deep about our moral commitments. A similar argument can be made within the domain of epistemology. Our "epistemic (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  34.  28
    Experimenting on Theories.Deborah Dowling - 1999 - Science in Context 12 (2):261-273.
  35. Organizations as True Believers.Deborah Tollefsen - 2002 - Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (3):395–410.
  36.  93
    Alignment, Transactive Memory, and Collective Cognitive Systems.Deborah P. Tollefsen, Rick Dale & Alexandra Paxton - 2013 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (1):49-64.
    Research on linguistic interaction suggests that two or more individuals can sometimes form adaptive and cohesive systems. We describe an “alignment system” as a loosely interconnected set of cognitive processes that facilitate social interactions. As a dynamic, multi-component system, it is responsive to higher-level cognitive states such as shared beliefs and intentions (those involving collective intentionality) but can also give rise to such shared cognitive states via bottom-up processes. As an example of putative group cognition we turn to transactive memory (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  37.  5
    Digital Companion Species and Eating Data: Implications for Theorising Digital Data–Human Assemblages.Deborah Lupton - 2016 - Big Data and Society 3 (1).
    This commentary is an attempt to begin to identify and think through some of the ways in which sociocultural theory may contribute to understandings of the relationship between humans and digital data. I develop an argument that rests largely on the work of two scholars in the field of science and technology studies: Donna Haraway and Annemarie Mol. Both authors emphasised materiality and multiple ontologies in their writing. I argue that these concepts have much to offer critical data studies. I (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  38.  36
    The Scope of Teleological Thinking in Preschool Children.Deborah Kelemen - 1999 - Cognition 70 (3):241-272.
  39. Group Testimony.Deborah Tollefsen - 2007 - Social Epistemology 21 (3):299 – 311.
    The fact that much of our knowledge is gained through the testimony of others challenges a certain form of epistemic individualism. We are clearly not autonomous knowers. But the discussion surrounding testimony has maintained a commitment to what I have elsewhere called epistemic agent individualism. Both the reductionist and the anti-reductionist have focused their attention on the testimony of individuals. But groups, too, are sources of testimony - or so I shall argue. If groups can be testifiers, a natural question (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  40. WIKIPEDIA and the Epistemology of Testimony.Deborah Tollefsen - 2009 - Episteme 6 (1):8-24.
    In “Group Testimony” (2007) I argued that the testimony of a group cannot be understood (or at least cannot always be understood) in a summative fashion; as the testimony of some or all of the group members. In some cases, it is the group itself that testifies. I also argued that one could extend standard reductionist accounts of the justification of testimonial belief to the case of testimonial belief formed on the basis of group testimony. In this paper, I explore (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  41.  66
    Quid Quidditism Est?Deborah Smith - 2016 - Erkenntnis 81 (2):237-257.
    Over the last decade or so, there has been a renewed interest in a view about properties known as quidditism. However, a review of the literature reveals that ‘quidditism’ is used to cover a range of distinct views. In this paper I explore the logical space of distinct types of quidditism. The first distinction noted is between quidditism as a thesis explicitly about property individuation and quidditism as a principle of unrestricted property recombination. The distinction recently drawn by Dustin Locke (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  42.  51
    We-Narratives and the Stability and Depth of Shared Agency.Deborah Tollefsen & Shaun Gallagher - 2017 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 47 (2):95-110.
    The basic approach to understanding shared agency has been to identify individual intentional states that are somehow “shared” by participants and that contribute to guiding and informing the actions of individual participants. But, as Michael Bratman suggests, there is a problem of stability and depth that any theory of shared agency needs to solve. Given that participants in a joint action might form shared intentions for different reasons, what binds them to one another such that they have some reason for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  43.  29
    Connectivity Thinking, Animism, and the Pursuit of Liveliness.Deborah Bird Rose - 2017 - Educational Theory 67 (4):491-508.
    In this essay, Deborah Bird Rose takes up Val Plumwood's challenge that Western thought needs radical revitalization by pursuing the liveliness of the biosphere and human ontologies of connectivity. The first part looks at obstacles to the West's understanding of Earth as a place of lively, interactive connectivities that promote diversity, complexity, and relationality. In this context Rose offers a brief overview of Indigenous animisms. The second part explores the question of liveliness. It is taken as given that the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  80
    Why Robots Should Not Be Treated Like Animals.Deborah G. Johnson & Mario Verdicchio - 2018 - Ethics and Information Technology 20 (4):291-301.
    Responsible Robotics is about developing robots in ways that take their social implications into account, which includes conceptually framing robots and their role in the world accurately. We are now in the process of incorporating robots into our world and we are trying to figure out what to make of them and where to put them in our conceptual, physical, economic, legal, emotional and moral world. How humans think about robots, especially humanoid social robots, which elicit complex and sometimes disconcerting (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  45. School Trouble: Identity, Power and Politics in Education.Deborah Youdell - 2010 - Routledge.
    What is the trouble with schools and why should we want to make ‘school trouble’? Schooling is implicated in the making of educational and social exclusions and inequalities as well as the making of particular sorts of students and teachers. For this reason schools are important sites of counter- or radical- politics. In this book, Deborah Youdell brings together theories of counter-politics and radical traditions in education to make sense of the politics of daily life inside schools and explores (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  46. Collective Intentionality.Deborah Tollefsen - 2004 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  47.  91
    Un-Making Artificial Moral Agents.Deborah G. Johnson & Keith W. Miller - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):123-133.
    Floridi and Sanders, seminal work, “On the morality of artificial agents” has catalyzed attention around the moral status of computer systems that perform tasks for humans, effectively acting as “artificial agents.” Floridi and Sanders argue that the class of entities considered moral agents can be expanded to include computers if we adopt the appropriate level of abstraction. In this paper we argue that the move to distinguish levels of abstraction is far from decisive on this issue. We also argue that (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  48.  97
    Error and Inference: Recent Exchanges on Experimental Reasoning, Reliability, and the Objectivity and Rationality of Science.Deborah G. Mayo & Aris Spanos (eds.) - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Although both philosophers and scientists are interested in how to obtain reliable knowledge in the face of error, there is a gap between their perspectives that has been an obstacle to progress. By means of a series of exchanges between the editors and leaders from the philosophy of science, statistics and economics, this volume offers a cumulative introduction connecting problems of traditional philosophy of science to problems of inference in statistical and empirical modelling practice. Philosophers of science and scientific practitioners (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  49.  49
    The Ethics of Autism: Among Them, but Not of Them.Deborah R. Barnbaum - 2008 - Indiana University Press.
    Autism is one of the most compelling, controversial, and heartbreaking cognitive disorders. It presents unique philosophical challenges as well, raising intriguing questions in philosophy of mind, cognitive science, and philosophy of language that need to be explored if the autistic population is to be responsibly served. Starting from the "theory of mind" thesis that a fundamental deficit in autism is the inability to recognize that other persons have minds, Deborah R. Barnbaum considers its implications for the nature of consciousness, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  50.  2
    Economics and the Philosophy of Science.Deborah A. Redman - 1991 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Economists and other social scientists in this century have often supported economic arguments by referring to positions taken by philosophers of science. This important new book looks at the reliability of this practice and, in the process, provides economists, social scientists, and historians with the necessary background to discuss methodological matters with authority. Redman first presents an accurate, critical, yet neutral survey of the modern philosophy of science from the Vienna Circle to the present, focusing particularly on logical positivism, sociological (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000