14 found
Order:
  1.  12
    Phases of a Pandemic Surge: The Experience of an Ethics Service in New York City during COVID-19.Joseph J. Fins, Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, C. Ronald MacKenzie, Seth A. Waldman, Mary F. Chisholm, Jennifer E. Hersh, Zachary E. Shapiro, Joan M. Walker, Nicole Meredyth, Nekee Pandya, Douglas S. T. Green, Samantha F. Knowlton, Ezra Gabbay, Debjani Mukherjee & Barrie J. Huberman - 2020 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 31 (3):219-227.
    When the COVID-19 surge hit New York City hospitals, the Division of Medical Ethics at Weill Cornell Medical College, and our affiliated ethics consultation services, faced waves of ethical issues sweeping forward with intensity and urgency. In this article, we describe our experience over an eight-week period (16 March through 10 May 2020), and describe three types of services: clinical ethics consultation (CEC); service practice communications/interventions (SPCI); and organizational ethics advisement (OEA). We tell this narrative through the prism of time, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  11
    Emerging Roles of Clinical Ethicists.Margot M. Eves, David M. Chooljian, Susan McCammon, Debjani Mukherjee, Emma Tumilty & Jeffrey S. Farroni - 2019 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 30 (3):262-269.
    Debates regarding clinical ethicists’ scope of practice are not novel and will continue to evolve. Rapid changes in healthcare delivery, outcomes, and expectations have necessitated flexibility in clinical ethicists’ roles whereby hospital-based clinical ethicists are expected to be woven into the institutional fabric in a way that did not exist in more traditional relationships. In this article we discuss three emerging roles: the ethicist embedded in the interdisciplinary team, the ethicist with an expanded educational mandate, and the ethicist as a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  30
    If Not Now, Then When? Taking Disability Seriously in Bioethics.Debjani Mukherjee, Preya S. Tarsney & Kristi L. Kirschner - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (3):37-48.
    Hastings Center Report, Volume 52, Issue 3, Page 37-48, May–June 2022.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  27
    Discharge Decisions and the Dignity of Risk.Debjani Mukherjee - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (3):7-8.
    Mrs. Smith's eyes filled with tears as she said, “I feel like I've done something wrong. Are they punishing me because I've been refusing therapy and won't go to a nursing home?” She acknowledged that she hadn't always listened to her doctors but said that she knew better now and wanted to go home and see if she could make it work. Many staff members at our rehabilitation hospital had explained their safety concerns to her, and some had enlisted her (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5.  20
    Refusal of Dialysis: Context Matters.Debjani Mukherjee & Nekee Pandya - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (8):91-93.
    As ethics consultants on a busy consult service in a large urban setting, we would approach this case by gathering more information and context. This involves clarifying the clinical facts, underst...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Conflicting Beliefs.Vidya Bhushan Gupta & Debjani Mukherjee - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (4):14-15.
    Vijay is a forty-eight-year-old man with profound mental retardation and cerebral palsy. He uses a wheelchair, cannot speak or eat by mouth, and requires constant care. He lived in a group home for twenty-eight years. During the last year, Vijay has required two visits to the emergency room on average per month and has been hospitalized for two hundred days in total. These hospitalizations are the result of a number of painful and dangerous complications related to the gastrostomy tube that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  21
    Commentary: Surrogate Decisionmaking and Communication.Debjani Mukherjee - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (3):560-563.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  13
    Dignity of Risk and Attributions About the Other.Debjani Mukherjee - 2022 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 65 (2):213-220.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  19
    Experiencing Community in a Covid Surge.Debjani Mukherjee - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):10-11.
    As I organize a pile of ethics consult chart notes in New York City in mid‐April 2020, I look at the ten cases that I have co‐consulted on recently. Nine of the patients were found to be Covid positive. The reasons for the consults are mostly familiar—surrogate decision‐making, informed refusal of treatment, goals of care, defining futility. But the context is unfamiliar and unsettling. Bioethicists are in pandemic mode, dusting off and revising triage plans. Patients and potential patients are fearful—of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  17
    Editor's Introduction: Disability, Social Justice, and Dignity of Risk at 50 Years.Debjani Mukherjee - 2022 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 65 (2):157-161.
    Dignity of risk is a simple concept that is surprisingly hard to enact, honor, and prioritize in health care. The term was coined 50 years ago by Robert Perske in an article entitled "The Dignity of Risk and the Mentally Retarded". And as I have written in "Discharge Decisions and the Dignity of Risk", "the concept involves respect for persons, self-determination, and attempts to minimize paternalism or parentalism". Most simply, the dignity of risk embraces respecting or honoring an individual's choices (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  19
    In Defense of Common Human Responses.Debjani Mukherjee & Rebecca Brashler - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (9):20-22.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  30
    Learning from Lingering Angst.Debjani Mukherjee - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (3):9-10.
    I am leading a debriefing session—the second part of a three-part model we have started for ethics consultations at our rehabilitation hospital. The debriefing is loosely organized. We begin with follow-up from a recent ethics consultation. For some team members, this is a time to learn how ethics was involved and how things got resolved. I then ask for their responses to the case: what went right, what went wrong.One team member remarks, "I was angry at Maria's daughter. She never (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Freeman replies.Teresa A. Savage, Kristi L. Kirschner, Rebecca Brashler & Debjani Mukherjee - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  31
    ""On" humility": the limited effect of disability.Teresa A. Savage, Kristi L. Kirschner, Rebecca Brashler & Debjani Mukherjee - 2004 - Hastings Center Report 34 (6):5.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark