Results for 'Death Islam.'

992 found
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  1.  2
    Contemporary Medicalization and the Ethics of Death and Dying.Asmat Ara Islam - 2021 - Bangladesh Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):29-36.
    This paper argues that contemporary medicalization is one of the reasons why death and dying should be considered as ethical issues. First, two distinct features regarding death and dying can be analysed by comparing ‘tamed death’ and ‘death untamed’. The distinction between death in Ars Moriendi and death as deprivationism has been compared before deducing a conclusion that biomedical ethics is an indispensable tool today to deal with the morality of death and dying. (...)
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  2.  39
    A Study on Service Availability and Readiness Assessment of Non-Communicable Disease Using the WHO Tool for Gazipur District in Bangladesh.Mohammad Rashedul Islam, Shamima Parvin Laskar & Darryl Macer - 2016 - Bangladesh Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):1-13.
    Non-communicable diseases disproportionately affect low and middle-income countries where nearly three quarters of NCD deaths occur. Bangladesh is also in NCD burden. This cross-sectional study was done on 50 health facilities centres at Gazipur district in Bangladesh from July 2015 to December 2015 to introduce SARA for better monitoring and evaluation of non-communicable diseases health service delivery. The General Service readiness index score was 61.52% refers to the fact that about 62% of all the facilities were ready to provide general (...)
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  3. Part I. Methodological Issues: 1. End-of-Life Care, Dying and Death Islamic Ethics, A Primer.Mohammed Ghaly - 2022 - In End-of-life care, dying and death in the Islamic moral tradition. Boston: Brill.
  4.  67
    Brain death in islamic ethico-legal deliberation: Challenges for applied islamic bioethics.Aasim I. Padela, Ahsan Arozullah & Ebrahim Moosa - 2011 - Bioethics 27 (3):132-139.
    Since the 1980s, Islamic scholars and medical experts have used the tools of Islamic law to formulate ethico-legal opinions on brain death. These assessments have varied in their determinations and remain controversial. Some juridical councils such as the Organization of Islamic Conferences' Islamic Fiqh Academy (OIC-IFA) equate brain death with cardiopulmonary death, while others such as the Islamic Organization of Medical Sciences (IOMS) analogize brain death to an intermediate state between life and death. Still other (...)
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  5.  33
    End-of-life care, dying and death in the Islamic moral tradition.Mohammed Ghaly (ed.) - 2022 - Boston: Brill.
    Modern biomedical technologies managed to revolutionise the End-of-Life Care (EoLC) in many aspects. The dying process can now be "engineered" by managing the accompanying physical symptoms or by "prolonging/hastening" death itself. Such interventions questioned and problematised long-established understandings of key moral concepts, such as good life, quality of life, pain, suffering, good death, appropriate death, dying well, etc. This volume examines how multifaceted EoLC moral questions can be addressed from interdisciplinary perspectives within the Islamic tradition. Contributors Amir (...)
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  6.  41
    Family and community concerns about post-mortem needle biopsies in a Muslim society.Emily S. Gurley, Shahana Parveen, M. Saiful Islam, M. Jahangir Hossain, Nazmun Nahar, Nusrat Homaira, Rebeca Sultana, James J. Sejvar, Mahmudur Rahman & Stephen P. Luby - 2011 - BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):10.
    Background: Post-mortem needle biopsies have been used in resource-poor settings to determine cause of death and there is interest in using them in Bangladesh. However, we did not know how families and communities would perceive this procedure or how they would decide whether or not to consent to a post-mortem needle biopsy. The goal of this study was to better understand family and community concerns and decision-making about post-mortem needle biopsies in this low-income, predominantly Muslim country in order to (...)
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  7. Paper: Brain death revisited: it is not ‘complete death’ according to Islamic sources.Ahmet Bedir & Şahin Aksoy - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (5):290-294.
    Concepts, such as death, life and spirit cannot be known in their quintessential nature, but can be defined in accordance with their effects. In fact, those who think within the mode of pragmatism and Cartesian logic have ignored the metaphysical aspects of these terms. According to Islam, the entity that moves the body is named the soul. And the aliment of the soul is air. Cessation of breathing means leaving of the soul from the body. Those who agree on (...)
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  8. Brain death and islamic traditions.Birgit Krawietz - 2003 - In Jonathan E. Brockopp (ed.), Islamic Ethics of Life: Abortion, War, and Euthanasia. University of South Carolina Press. pp. 194--213.
  9.  38
    ‘They say Islam has a solution for everything, so why are there no guidelines for this?’ Ethical dilemmas associated with the births and deaths of infants with fatal abnormalities from a small Sample of pakistani muslim couples in Britain.Alison Shaw - 2011 - Bioethics 26 (9):485-492.
    This paper presents ethical dilemmas concerning the termination of pregnancy, the management of childbirth, and the withdrawal of life-support from infants in special care, for a small sample of British Pakistani Muslim parents of babies diagnosed with fatal abnormalities. Case studies illustrating these dilemmas are taken from a qualitative study of 66 families of Pakistani origin referred to a genetics clinic in Southern England. The paper shows how parents negotiated between the authoritative knowledge of their doctors, religious experts, and senior (...)
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  10.  15
    The Islamic Understanding of Death and Resurrection.Michael Collins Dunn - 1983 - Philosophy East and West 33 (3):310-311.
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  11.  45
    Death of a Prophet: The End of Muhammad’s Life and the Beginnings of Islam. By Stephen J. Shoemaker. [REVIEW]Robert Hoyland - 2021 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 134 (4):728-730.
    The Death of a Prophet: The End of Muhammad’s Life and the Beginnings of Islam. By Stephen J. Shoemaker. Divinations: Rereading Late Ancient Religion. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012. Pp. vii + 408. $75.
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  12.  2
    Can Islamic Jurisprudence Justify Procurement of Transplantable Vital Organs in Brain Death?Mohamed Y. Rady - 2018 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 29 (2):162-163.
  13.  24
    The Islamic Understanding of Death and Resurrection.Mahmoud M. Ayoub - 1983 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 103 (2):447.
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  14.  76
    The degree of certainty in brain death: probability in clinical and Islamic legal discourse.Faisal Qazi, Joshua C. Ewell, Ayla Munawar, Usman Asrar & Nadir Khan - 2013 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (2):117-131.
    The University of Michigan conference “Where Religion, Policy, and Bioethics Meet: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Islamic Bioethics and End-of-Life Care” in April 2011 addressed the issue of brain death as the prototype for a discourse that would reflect the emergence of Islamic bioethics as a formal field of study. In considering the issue of brain death, various Muslim legal experts have raised concerns over the lack of certainty in the scientific criteria as applied to the definition and diagnosis (...)
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  15. The good death in islamic theology and law.Jonathan E. Brockopp - 2003 - In Islamic Ethics of Life: Abortion, War, and Euthanasia. University of South Carolina Press.
  16.  4
    Beyond death: the mystical teachings of ʻAyn al-Quḍāt al-Hamadhānī.Firoozeh Papan-Matin - 2010 - Boston: Brill.
    Ayn al-Qu t al-Hamadh n (d. 1131) is a defining mystic of medieval Iran whose teachings influenced many Iranian and Indian scholars after him. A major focus in his work is his approach to death as a state of consciousness. Drawing on medieval manuscripts and primary sources, this book offers insight on this mystic and his perception of death.
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  17. Muslim Disquiet over Brain-Death: Advancing Islamic Bioethics Discourses by Treating Death as a Social Construct that Aligns Purposes with Criteria and Ethical Behaviours.Aasim I. Padela - 2022 - In Mohammed Ghaly (ed.), End-of-life care, dying and death in the Islamic moral tradition. Boston: Brill.
  18.  78
    Birth and Death in an Islamic Society.Paul Vieille & Victor A. Velen - 1967 - Diogenes 15 (57):101-127.
  19.  72
    Islamic biomedical ethics: principles and application.Abdulaziz Abdulhussein Sachedina - 2009 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    In search of principles of health care in Islam -- Health and suffering -- Beginning of life -- Terminating early life -- Death and dying -- Organ donation and cosmetic enhancement -- Recent developments -- Epilogue.
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  20.  16
    Brain Death and its Entanglements.Omarsultan Haque - 2008 - Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (1):13-36.
    The Islamic philosophical, mystical, and theological sub‐traditions have each made characteristic assumptions about the human person, including an incorporation of substance dualism in distinctive manners. Advances in the brain sciences of the last half century, which include a widespread acceptance of death as the end of essential brain function, require the abandonment of dualistic notions of the human person that assert an immaterial and incorporeal soul separate from a body. In this article, I trace classical Islamic notions of (...) and the soul, the modern definition of death as “brain death,” and some contemporary Islamic responses to this definition. I argue that a completely naturalistic account of human personhood in the Islamic tradition is the best and most viable alternative for the future. This corporeal monistic account of Muslim personhood as embodied consciousness incorporates the insights of pre‐modern Muslim thinkers yet rehabilitates their characteristic mistakes and thus has the advantages of neuroscientific validity and modern relevance in trans‐cultural ethical discourse; it also helps to alleviate organ shortages in countries with majority Muslim populations, a serious ethical impasse of recent years. (shrink)
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  21. Brain death and its entanglements.Omar Sultan Haque - 2008 - Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (1):13-36.
    The Islamic philosophical, mystical, and theological sub-traditions have each made characteristic assumptions about the human person, including an incorporation of substance dualism in distinctive manners. Advances in the brain sciences of the last half century, which include a widespread acceptance of death as the end of essential brain function, require the abandonment of dualistic notions of the human person that assert an immaterial and incorporeal soul separate from a body. In this article, I trace classical Islamic notions of (...) and the soul, the modern definition of death as "brain death," and some contemporary Islamic responses to this definition. I argue that a completely naturalistic account of human personhood in the Islamic tradition is the best and most viable alternative for the future. This corporeal monistic account of Muslim personhood as embodied consciousness incorporates the insights of pre-modern Muslim thinkers yet rehabilitates their characteristic mistakes and thus has the advantages of neuroscientific validity and modern relevance in trans-cultural ethical discourse; it also helps to alleviate organ shortages in countries with majority Muslim populations, a serious ethical impasse of recent years. (shrink)
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  22.  14
    Beyond death: the mystical teachings of ʻAyn al-Quḍāt al-Hamadhānī.Firoozeh Papan-Matin - 2010 - Boston: Brill.
    This famous Persian mystic was born in Hamadhān in ah 490 or 492 (ad/) and was executed in the same town in 525/ on the charge of heresy. ...
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  23.  28
    Michel Houellebecq’s shifting representation of Islam: From the death of God to counter-Enlightenment.Camil Ungureanu - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):514-528.
    Michel Houellebecq has, I argue, changed significantly his portrayal of Islam: in earlier novels, he advances a hostile view of it premised on the secularist belief in the death of God and the inexorable decline of monotheism. Houellebecq sets capitalism against Islam, and advances a vision of a godless ‘religion positive’ better suited for capitalist modernity. In contrast, in his last novel and interventions, Houellebecq makes a post-secular turn largely driven by the radicalization of positivist ideas relying on evolutionary (...)
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  24. Islamic ethics of life: abortion, war, and euthanasia.Jonathan E. Brockopp (ed.) - 2003 - Columbia, S.C.: University of South Carolina Press.
    o ne -taking -Life ana Oavmg .Life The Islamic Context Jonathan E. Brockopp The great ethicists of the western world, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, and others, ...
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  25.  64
    The moral code in Islam and organ donation in Western countries: reinterpreting religious scriptures to meet utilitarian medical objectives.Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde - 2014 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9:11.
    End-of-life organ donation is controversial in Islam. The controversy stems from: scientifically flawed medical criteria of death determination; invasive perimortem procedures for preserving transplantable organs; and incomplete disclosure of information to consenting donors and families. Data from a survey of Muslims residing in Western countries have shown that the interpretation of religious scriptures and advice of faith leaders were major barriers to willingness for organ donation. Transplant advocates have proposed corrective interventions: reinterpreting religious scriptures, reeducating faith leaders, and utilizing (...)
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  26. Islamic bioethics of pain medication: an effective response to mercy argument.Mohammad Manzoor Malik - 2012 - Bangladesh Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):4-15.
    Pain medication is one of the responses to the mercy argument that utilitarian ethicists use for justifying active euthanasia on the grounds of prevention of cruelty and appeal to beneficence. The researcher reinforces the significance of pain medication in meeting this challenge and considers it the most preferred response among various other responses. It is because of its realism and effectiveness. In exploring the mechanism and considerations related to pain medication, the researcher briefly touches the Catholic ethical position on the (...)
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  27.  8
    Understanding riddah in Islamic jurisprudence: Between textual interpretation and human rights.Rokhmadi Rokhmadi, Moh Khasan, Nasihun Amin & Umul Baroroh - 2023 - HTS Theological Studies 79 (1):7.
    The application of the death penalty for perpetrators of riddah by fuqaha is a problematic violation of human rights. This is because there is no good reason to show that the punishment for riddah is the death penalty. The existence of the hadith which is considered to be the legitimacy of riddah punishment turns out to be very different from the reality of its application in the history of Islamic criminal law. This article aims to answer academic anxiety (...)
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  28.  40
    Islam and bioethics.Jonathan E. Brockopp - 2008 - Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (1):3-12.
    Muslim theologians, jurists, and healthcare workers have been addressing the challenges of modern biotechnology for years. Major textbooks on religion and bioethics cover Islam in one or two articles, offering only a general introduction to these important discussions. The five articles in this issue of the "Journal of Religious Ethics", originating from a conference at Pennsylvania State University, are unusual in the specificity of their topics-brain death, feeding tubes, sex selection, spiritual counseling, and organ transplantation-and in their engagement with (...)
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  29.  9
    Muhammad's Grave: Death Rites and the Making of Islamic Society. [REVIEW]Leor Halevi - 2008 - Speculum 83 (4):999--1000.
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  30.  61
    Islamic Philosophy and Artificial Intelligence: Epistemological Arguments.Biliana Popova - 2020 - Zygon 55 (4):977-995.
    This essay presents an analysis of different processes of machine learning: supervised, unsupervised, and semisupervised, through the prism of the epistemologies of several prominent Islamic philosophical schools. I discuss the way each school conceptualizes the ontological absolute (immortality, death, afterlife) and the way this shapes their respective epistemologies. I present an analysis of the different machine learning processes through the prism of the epistemological constructs of each of these philosophic traditions. I conclude with the argument that more scholars from (...)
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  31. The individual's experience as it applies to the community: An examination of six dream narrations dealing with the Islamic understanding of Death = Un examen de seis narraciones de sueños que tienen relación con la comprensión islámica de la muerte.Leah Kimberg - 2000 - Al-Qantara 21 (2):425-444.
    El artículo versa sobre la manera islámica de comprender la muerte a partir del análisis de la narración de seis sueños. El Islam clásico concedía especial importancia a los sueños, que desempeñan un papel esencial en el desciframiento del enigma de la muerte y del morir, a partir de narraciones de sueños que tratan de sucesos cotidianos descritos de una manera sencilla, se traslucen cuestiones de la mayor importancia acerca del proceso de la muerte y del más allá. Aunque cada (...)
     
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  32.  9
    The individual's experience as it applies to the community: An examination of six dream narrations dealing with the Islamic understanding of death.Leah Kinberg - 2000 - Al-Qantara 21 (2):425-444.
    El artículo versa sobre la manera islámica de comprender la muerte a partir del análisis de la narración de seis sueños. El Islam clásico concedía especial importancia a los sueños, que desempeñan un papel esencial en el desciframiento del enigma de la muerte y del morir, a partir de narraciones de sueños que tratan de sucesos cotidianos descritos de una manera sencilla, se traslucen cuestiones de la mayor importancia acerca del proceso de la muerte y del más allá. Aunque cada (...)
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  33.  4
    A Theory for Resolving the Limitations of Confucianism with Islam in the Ma-Dexin(馬德新)’ Philosophy - The Life and Death of Confucianism and Life after Life -. 권상우 - 2021 - Journal of the New Korean Philosophical Association 106:51-72.
    논문에서는 중국이슬람 학자인 마덕신(馬德新)의 유학의 생사관에 대한 입장과 이슬람의 후세 부활설을 논의하였다. 마덕신은 도덕적이고 자연적인 유학의 생사관은 인간의 죽음에 대한 근본적인 두려움과 공포심을 해소할 수 없다고 비판하면서, 유학의 부족한 점을 이슬람의 후세 부활설로 보완하고자 한다. 그는 유학의 죽음관은 영혼불멸을 인정하지 않는다고 비판하면서 이슬람의 부활설을 제시한다.BR 마덕신은 부활설을 통해서 현세와 후세를 연결하면서, 현세는 도덕적인 삶을 살아야 하는 공간으로, 후세는 자신의 선악을 재판하는 장소로 구분한다. 마덕신은 알라는 절대 공정한 존재이며, 어떠한 차별도 하지 않는다고 주장한다. 현세에는 악을 짓고도 벌을 받지 않거나 선을 행하고도 (...)
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  34.  5
    Beyond Death: The Mystical Teachings of ʿAyn al-Quḍāt al-Hamadhānī. By Firoozeh Papan-Matin.Asghar Seyed-Gohrab - 2021 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 133 (1).
    Beyond Death: The Mystical Teachings of ʿAyn al-Quḍāt al-Hamadhānī. By Firoozeh Papan-Matin. Islamic History and Civilization, vol. 75. Leiden: Brill, 2010. Pp. x + 242. $150.
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  35.  7
    Islam Rimba: Islamic philosophy and local culture engagement in Sumatera.Waryono Waryono, M. Nurdin Zuhdi, M. Anwar Nawawi & Elmansyah Elmansyah - 2021 - HTS Theological Studies 77 (4):1-8.
    This research aims to reveal the historical roots and elements of the background for the formation of the Orang Rimba's religion. This study is based on field research with a descriptive approach of religious phenomenon. The research derives some conclusions: the Orang Rimba is monotheist, that is, they are not adherents to dynamism, polytheism, or animism as it has been understood. The history of the Orang Rimba's religion is affected by two elements; namely, Rimba culture and Islamic culture. Evidence suggests (...)
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  36.  78
    Islamic Views on Artificial Nutrition and Hydration in Terminally Ill Patients.Sami Alsolamy - 2012 - Bioethics 28 (2):96-99.
    Withholding and withdrawing artificial nutrition and hydration from terminally ill patients poses many ethical challenges. The literature provides little information about the Islamic beliefs, attitudes, and laws related to these challenges. Artificial nutrition and hydration may be futile and reduce quality of life. They can also harm the terminally ill patient because of complications such as aspiration pneumonia, dyspnea, nausea, diarrhea, and hypervolemia. From the perspective of Islam, rules governing the care of terminally ill patients are derived from the principle (...)
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  37.  12
    Communication skills according to Islamic teachings and students’ life skills.Rubino Rubino, Iskandar Muda, Ahmed Almedee, Sohaib Alam, Ali Dawod Ali, Rustam Sadikov & Elena Panova - 2023 - HTS Theological Studies 79 (2):6.
    Religious teachings express the fact that a human is a social being and associates with various people. In order to have a successful and safe life, we should refrain from any selfishness, harming others, malice and humiliating people and should always be forgiving, selfless and humble in relationships. Interpersonal relationships are one of the most important components of human life from birth to death; none of the potential capabilities of humans grow except in the shadow of interpersonal relationships. Learning (...)
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  38.  14
    Islamic Perspectives on Clinical Intervention Near the End of Life: We Can but Must We?Aasim I. Padela & Omar Qureshi - 2019 - In Timothy D. Knepper, Lucy Bregman & Mary Gottschalk (eds.), Death and Dying : An Exercise in Comparative Philosophy of Religion. Springer Verlag. pp. 201-225.
    The ever-increasing technological advances of modern medicine have increased physicians’ capacity to carry out a wide array of clinical interventions near the end of life. These new procedures have resulted in new “types” of living where a patient’s cognitive functions are severely diminished although many physiological functions remain active. In this biomedical context, patients, surrogate decision-makers, and clinicians all struggle with decisions about what clinical interventions to pursue and when therapeutic intent should be replaced with palliative goals of care. For (...)
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  39.  15
    Death, dying and informatics: misrepresenting religion on MedLine.Pablo Rodríguez Del Pozo & Joseph J. Fins - 2005 - BMC Medical Ethics 6 (1):1-5.
    BackgroundThe globalization of medical science carries for doctors worldwide a correlative duty to deepen their understanding of patients' cultural contexts and religious backgrounds, in order to satisfy each as a unique individual. To become better informed, practitioners may turn to MedLine, but it is unclear whether the information found there is an accurate representation of culture and religion. To test MedLine's representation of this field, we chose the topic of death and dying in the three major monotheistic religions.MethodsWe searched (...)
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  40.  2
    Islamic and Jewish Philosophers.Oliver Leaman & David E. Cooper - 2017 - In Robert L. Arrington (ed.), A Companion to the Philosophers. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 665–690.
    Averroes is the Latin name of Abu'l Walid ibn Ahmad ibn Muhammad ibn Rushd (1126–1198 ce), who was born in Cordoba, Spain. He was a public official, serving as both royal physician and judge, but his political career was often difficult, and by the time of his death he had suffered banishment to North Africa. He is an outstanding representative of the great cultural achievements of Muslim Spain, and produced philosophical works which came to resonate through the West for (...)
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  41.  9
    Sacred rituals and humane death: religion in the ethics and politics of modern meat.Magfirah Dahlan-Taylor - 2019 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    Sacred Rituals and Humane Death critically analyzes the civilizing nature of the underlying fundamental concept of "humaneness" in contemporary discourses around modern meat and animal ethics. As religious methods of animal slaughter, such as the halal method in Islam, as well as the practice of religious animal sacrifice, are sometimes categorized as barbaric in recent debates, the civilizing narrative of progress leads supposedly to more humane adaptation of methods and practices of animal curation and slaughter. This volume argues that (...)
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  42.  9
    Jokes, Life After Death, and God.Joseph Bobik - 2014 - St. Augustine's Press.
    _Jokes, Life after Death, and God _has two main tasks: to try to understand exactly what a joke is, and to see whether there are any connections between jokes, on the one hand, and life after death and God, on the other hand. But it pursues other tasks as well, tasks of an ancillary sort. This book devises a general and comprehensive, but brief, theory of jokes. The author begins with critiques of other writers’ views on the subject. (...)
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  43. Proposed Expert System for Calculating Inheritance in Islam.Alaa N. Akkila & Samy S. Abu Naser - 2016 - World Wide Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development 2 (9):38-48.
    The truth of every human being is the end his life with death, and this leads to leaving assets and funds for those after him and can lead to hate between the heirs, it has made a point of Islamic law on all aspects of life, including the subject of the inheritance of the deceased. The main problem is how to get the knowledge of the basics of inheritance. This paper reviews work done in the use of expert system (...)
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  44.  12
    The Gift of Death as the Grand Narrative of Humanism: Towards an Inclusive Ethos for Co-realization.T. J. Abraham - 2022 - Tattva - Journal of Philosophy 14 (1):85-102.
    The celebrated western humanist tradition has its source in its early philosophical texts. In The Gift of Death, Derrida analyses the history of the emergence of ethical responsibility in the so-called Religions of the Book such as Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. While the humanist project helped itself through its conquest of the human sphere, it has served to upset the ecological balance and jeopardize sustainability. While searching for an inclusive vision for a sustainable, ethical perspective, Dōgen’s philosophy gains relevance (...)
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  45.  20
    Conceptions of Caliphate in Contemporary Islamic Thought: Muhammad Hamīdullah and High Caliphate Council.Abdulkadir Maci̇t - 2018 - Cumhuriyet İlahiyat Dergisi 22 (2):833-858.
    After the death of Prophet Muhammad (p.b.u.h), one of the most significant debated topics of Muslims was the institution of caliphate. This institution caused crucial argumentations through the ages from Abu Bakr to Abd-al-Majid who was the hundreth khalifa. Some prominent issues in that regard as follows: How khalifa comes to power, who becomes khalifa, whether he is descended from Quraysh or not, which kind of traits khalifa should have, and how khalifa should behave in certain circumstances. While these (...)
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  46.  8
    The Death and Disposal of Sacred Texts.Ahmed El Shamsy - 2022 - Der Islam: Journal of the History and Culture of the Middle East 99 (1):97-112.
    Both Islamic and Jewish thought display a sensitivity to the treatment of texts, particularly sacred texts. This article investigates Muslim debates on how to dispose of worn-out sacred texts. It argues that these debates were rooted in the precedent formed by the reported destruction of noncanonical copies of the Qurʾān by the third caliph ʿUthmān, and they featured various preferred and rejected methods of text disposal, including burning, washing, shredding, and burying. By the thirteenth century CE, these debates had yielded (...)
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  47.  3
    Review: A. H. Mathias Zahniser. The Mission & Death of Jesus in Islam and Christianity. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 2008. 268 pages. ISBN: 9781570758072. [REVIEW]David Emmanuel Singh - 2010 - Transformation: An International Journal of Holistic Mission Studies 27 (2):139-140.
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  48. Brain-Dead Patients are not Cadavers: The Need to Revise the Definition of Death in Muslim Communities. [REVIEW]Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde - 2013 - HEC Forum 25 (1):25-45.
    The utilitarian construct of two alternative criteria of human death increases the supply of transplantable organs at the end of life. Neither the neurological criterion (heart-beating donation) nor the circulatory criterion (non-heart-beating donation) is grounded in scientific evidence but based on philosophical reasoning. A utilitarian death definition can have unintended consequences for dying Muslim patients: (1) the expedited process of determining death for retrieval of transplantable organs can lead to diagnostic errors, (2) the equivalence of brain (...) with human death may be incorrect, and (3) end-of-life religious values and traditional rituals may be sacrificed. Therefore, it is imperative to reevaluate the two different types and criteria of death introduced by the Resolution (Fatwa) of the Council of Islamic Jurisprudence on Resuscitation Apparatus in 1986. Although we recognize that this Fatwa was based on best scientific evidence available at that time, more recent evidence shows that it rests on outdated knowledge and understanding of the phenomenon of human death. We recommend redefining death in Islam to reaffirm the singularity of this biological phenomenon as revealed in the Quran 14 centuries ago. (shrink)
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  49.  48
    From Logic in Islam to Islamic Logic.Musa Akrami - 2017 - Logica Universalis 11 (1):61-83.
    Speaking of relations between logic and religion in Islamic world may refer to logic in two respects: logic in religious texts, from doctrinal sacred texts such as Qur’ān and sayings of the Prophet to the Qur’ānic commentaries and the texts related to the principles and fundamentals of jurisprudence, all of which make use of some reasoning to persuade the audiences or to infer the rules and prescripts for religious behavior of the members of religious community; and logic as a discipline (...)
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    Not quite dead: why Egyptian doctors refuse the diagnosis of death by neurological criteria.Sherine Hamdy - 2013 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (2):147-160.
    Drawing on two years of ethnographic fieldwork in Egypt focused on organ transplantation, this paper examines the ways in which the “scientific” criteria of determining death in terms of brain function are contested by Egyptian doctors. Whereas in North American medical practice, the death of the “person” is associated with the cessation of brain function, in Egypt, any sign of biological life is evidence of the persistence, even if fleeting, of the soul. I argue that this difference does (...)
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