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  1. Virtue Ethics and Professional Roles.Justin Oakley & Dean Cocking - 2001 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Dean Cocking.
    Professionals, it is said, have no use for simple lists of virtues and vices. The complexities and constraints of professional roles create peculiar moral demands on the people who occupy them, and traits that are vices in ordinary life are praised as virtues in the context of professional roles. Should this disturb us, or is it naive to presume that things should be otherwise? Taking medical and legal practice as key examples, Justin Oakley and Dean Cocking develop a rigorous articulation (...)
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  2. Friendship and the self.Dean Cocking & Jeanette Kennett - 1998 - Ethics 108 (3):502-527.
    We argue that companion friendship is not importantly marked by self-disclosure as understood in either of these two ways. One's close friends need not be markedly similar to oneself, as is claimed by the mirror account, nor is the role of private information in establishing and maintaining intimacy important in the way claimed by the secrets view. Our claim will be that the mirror and secrets views not only fail to identify features that are in part constitutive of close or (...)
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  3. Friendship and moral danger.Dean Cocking & Jeanette Kennett - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (5):278-296.
    We focus here on some familiar kinds of cases of conflict between friendship and morality, and, on the basis of our account of the nature of friendship, argue for the following two claims: first, that in some cases where we are led morally astray by virtue of a relationship that makes its own demands on us, the relationship in question is properly called a friendship; second, that relationships of this kind are valuable in their own right.
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  4.  50
    Friendship and Moral Danger.Dean Cocking & Jeanette Kennett - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (5):278.
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  5.  10
    Evil online.Dean Cocking (ed.) - 2018 - Hoboken: Wiley.
    "I am delighted to offer my highest praise to Dean Cocking and Jeroen van den Hoven's brilliant new book, Evil Online. The confrontation between good and evil occupies a central place in the challenges facing our human nature, and this creative investigation into the spread of evil by means of all-powerful new technologies raises fundamental questions about our morality and values. Cocking and Van den Hoven's account of the moral fog of evil forces us to face both the demons within (...)
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  6. Unreal friends.Dean Cocking & Steve Matthews - 2000 - Ethics and Information Technology 2 (4):223-231.
    It has become quite common for people to develop `personal'' relationships nowadays, exclusively via extensive correspondence across the Net. Friendships, even romantic love relationships, are apparently, flourishing. But what kind of relations really are possible in this way? In this paper, we focus on the case of close friendship. There are various important markers that identify a relationship as one of close friendship. One will have, for instance, strong affection for the other, a disposition to act for their well-being and (...)
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  7. Indirect consequentialism, friendship, and the problem of alienation.Dean Cocking & Justin Oakley - 1995 - Ethics 106 (1):86-111.
    In this article we argue that the worries about whether a consequentialist agent will be alienated from those who are special to her go deeper than has so far been appreciated. Rather than pointing to a problem with the consequentialist agent's motives or purposes, we argue that the problem facing a consequentialist agent in the case of friendship concerns the nature of the psychological disposition which such an agent would have and how this kind of disposition sits with those which (...)
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  8.  7
    The Transformation of Social Life.Dean Cocking & Jeroen Hoven - 2018 - In Evil online. Hoboken: Wiley. pp. 59–82.
    Traditional social worlds enable plural modes of self‐expression and communication across both public and private realms. Our identity involves a variety of aspects of self. Moreover, plural and conflicting aspects of self are often presented within the context of one relationship, role, or encounter. The presentation of less chosen aspects of our selves often also provides the object for the expression of certain relational aspects of respect for one another's privacy. Self‐presentation and shared activity in many online social worlds can (...)
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  9.  48
    Plural selves and relational identity: Intimacy and privacy online.Dean Cocking - 2008 - In M. J. van den Joven & J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 123--141.
  10. Consequentialism, Moral Responsibility, and the Intention/ Foresight Distinction.Justin Oakley & Dean Cocking - 1994 - Utilitas 6 (2):201.
    In many recent discussions of the morality of actions where both good and bad consequences foreseeably ensue, the moral significance of the distinction between intended and foreseen consequences is rejected. This distinction is thought to bear on the moral status of actions by those who support the Doctrine of Double Effect. According to this doctrine, roughly speaking, to perform an action intending to bring about a particular bad effect as a means to some commensurate good end is impermissible, while performing (...)
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  11.  93
    Consequentialism, complacency, and slippery slope arguments.Justin Oakley & Dean Cocking - 2005 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (3):227-239.
    The standard problem with many slippery slope arguments is that they fail to provide us with the necessary evidence to warrant our believing that the significantly morally worse circumstances they predict will in fact come about. As such these arguments have widely been criticised as ‘scare-mongering’. Consequentialists have traditionally been at the forefront of such criticisms, demanding that we get serious about guiding our prescriptions for right action by a comprehensive appreciation of the empirical facts. This is not surprising, since (...)
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  12. Friendship and role morality.Dean Cocking & Jeanette Kennett - 2003 - In Kim Chong Chong, Sor-Hoon Tan & C. L. Ten (eds.), The Moral Circle and the Self: Chinese and Western Approaches. Open Court.
     
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  13.  7
    Index.Dean Cocking & Jeroen Hoven - 2018 - In Evil online. Hoboken: Wiley. pp. 157–159.
    Evil online is an increasingly disturbing phenomenon across a wide range of fronts, and, as is invariably the case with revolutionary technology. This chapter discusses various kinds of moral fog, from both online and traditional worlds. It then illustrates how thinking of evil doing in this way provides broader and deeper explanations of the territory of so‐called “banal evil”, and takes our understanding of evildoing a long way beyond banality. A notable online trend in which disturbing, even plainly appalling, conduct (...)
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  14.  21
    Introduction to Book Symposium on Bernard Gert's Common Morality: Deciding What to Do.Dean Cocking - 2005 - Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics 7 (1).
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  15. Moral Arrogance and Moral Disagreement.Dean Cocking - 2005 - Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics 7 (1).
     
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  16.  3
    Our Online Environment.Dean Cocking & Jeroen Hoven - 2018 - In Evil online. Hoboken: Wiley. pp. 33–58.
    This chapter discusses the following three fundamental features of our online environment: epistemic success, connectivity, and coordination. The Internet connects people and makes communication, interaction, and transactions between them easy and cheap. Two‐sided markets and platforms, like Uber, Airbnb and eBay, allow buyers and sellers, demand and supply, to find each other, and to coordinate their behavior and engage in interactions, transactions, and collaboration. In addition to these features, a number of other features of our online environments shed light on (...)
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  17. Professional interpretation and judgement, and the integrity of lawyers.Dean Cocking & Justin Oakley - unknown
     
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  18.  6
    The Fate of the Moral Life.Dean Cocking & Jeroen Hoven - 2018 - In Evil online. Hoboken: Wiley. pp. 119–149.
    Good moral character has commonly been understood in terms of its independence from, its contrast to, and its resilience against, the claims of self‐interest. And it has also been commonly understood in terms of its effectiveness in being able to issue in good conduct quite independently of the need of support from others and surrounds. Decisions that impact upon how we pursue our lives in all sorts of ways. Evil is characterized not only by contrast to what is good or (...)
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  19.  7
    The Moral Fog of Our Worlds.Dean Cocking & Jeroen Hoven - 2018 - In Evil online. Hoboken: Wiley. pp. 83–118.
    The moral fog is used in spiritual and religious contexts to describe the normative incompetence of our more widely shared and everyday lives. It describes features or circumstances of our worlds that render the nature and consequences of our conduct opaque, and so undermine our capacities for moral understanding and decision‐making. Better understanding the features that enable the problems of moral fog, helps explain much of the explosion in various types of evil that flourish online. Worlds that have brought problems (...)
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  20.  35
    Introduction: one thousand friends. [REVIEW]Dean Cocking, Jeroen den Hoven & Job Timmermans - 2012 - Ethics and Information Technology 14 (3):179-184.
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  21.  30
    Introduction: one thousand friends. [REVIEW]Dean Cocking, Jeroen van den Hoven & Job Timmermans - 2012 - Ethics and Information Technology 14 (3):179-184.
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