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  1. Unto Others: The Evolution and Psychology of Unselfish Behavior.Elliot Sober & David Sloan Wilson - 1998 - Harvard University Press.
    The authors demonstrate that unselfish behavior is in fact an important feature of both biological and human nature. Their book provides a panoramic view of altruism throughout the animal kingdom--from self-sacrificing parasites to the human capacity for selflessness--even as it explains the evolutionary sense of such behavior.
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  2. Reintroducing Group Selection to the Human Behavioral Sciences.David Sloan Wilson & Elliott Sober - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):585-608.
    In both biology and the human sciences, social groups are sometimes treated as adaptive units whose organization cannot be reduced to individual interactions. This group-level view is opposed by a more individualistic one that treats social organization as a byproduct of self-interest. According to biologists, group-level adaptations can evolve only by a process of natural selection at the group level. Most biologists rejected group selection as an important evolutionary force during the 1960s and 1970s but a positive literature began to (...)
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  3. A Critical Review of Philosophical Work on the Units of Selection Problem.Elliott Sober & David Sloan Wilson - 1994 - Philosophy of Science 61 (4):534-555.
    The evolutionary problem of the units of selection has elicited a good deal of conceptual work from philosophers. We review this work to determine where the issues now stand.
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  4.  31
    Unto Others.David Sloan Wilson & Elliott Sober - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):681-684.
    It is a challenge to explain how evolutionary altruism can evolve by the process of natural selection, since altruists in a group will be less fit than the selfish individuals in the same group who receive benefits but do not make donations of their own. Darwin proposed a theory of group selection to solve this puzzle. Very simply, even though altruists are less fit than selfish individuals within any single group, groups of altruists are more fit than groups of selfish (...)
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  5. On the Relationship Between Evolutionary and Psychological Definitions of Altruism and Selfishness.David Sloan Wilson - 1992 - Biology and Philosophy 7 (1):61-68.
    I examine the relationship between evolutionary definitions of altruism that are based on fitness effects and psychological definitions that are based on the motives of the actor. I show that evolutionary altruism can be motivated by proximate mechanisms that are psychologically either altruistic or selfish. I also show that evolutionary definitions do rely upon motives as a metaphor in which the outcome of natural selection is compared to the decisions of a psychologically selfish (or altruistic) individual. Ignoring the precise nature (...)
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  6.  16
    Unto Others.David Sloan Wilson & Elliott Sober - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):692-696.
    Altruism has both an evolutionary and a psychological meaning. As the term is used in evolutionary theory, a trait is deemed altruistic if it reduces the fitness of the actor and enhances the fitness of someone else. In its psychological sense, the thesis that we have altruistic ultimate motives asserts that we care about the welfare of others, not just as a means of enhancing our own well-being, but as an end in itself. In Unto Others (hereafter UO), we consider (...)
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  7.  27
    Evolution for Everyone: How Darwin’s Theory Can Change the Way We Think About Our Lives.David Sloan Wilson - 2007 - Delacorte Press.
    What is the biological reason for gossip? For laughter? For the creation of art? Why do dogs have curly tails? What can microbes tell us about morality? These and many other questions are tackled by renowned evolutionist David Sloan Wilson in this witty and groundbreaking new book. With stories that entertain as much as they inform, Wilson outlines the basic principles of evolution and shows how, properly understood, they can illuminate the length and breadth of creation, from the origin of (...)
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  8. Does Altruism Exist?: Culture, Genes, and the Welfare of Others.David Sloan Wilson - 2015 - Yale University Press.
    _A powerful treatise that demonstrates the existence of altruism in nature, with surprising implications for human society_ Does altruism exist? Or is human nature entirely selfish? In this eloquent and accessible book, famed biologist David Sloan Wilson provides new answers to this age-old question based on the latest developments in evolutionary science. From an evolutionary viewpoint, Wilson argues, altruism is inextricably linked to the functional organization of groups. “Groups that work” undeniably exist in nature and human society, although special conditions (...)
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  9.  29
    Evolving the Future: Toward a Science of Intentional Change.David Sloan Wilson, Steven C. Hayes, Anthony Biglan & Dennis D. Embry - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (4):395-416.
    Humans possess great capacity for behavioral and cultural change, but our ability to manage change is still limited. This article has two major objectives: first, to sketch a basic science of intentional change centered on evolution; second, to provide examples of intentional behavioral and cultural change from the applied behavioral sciences, which are largely unknown to the basic sciences community.All species have evolved mechanisms of phenotypic plasticity that enable them to respond adaptively to their environments. Some mechanisms of phenotypic plasticity (...)
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  10.  39
    Pathological Altruism.Barbara Oakley, Ariel Knafo, Guruprasad Madhavan & David Sloan Wilson (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
  11. Summary Of: ‘Unto Others. The Evolution and Psychology of Unselfish Behavior'.Elliott Sober & David Sloan Wilson - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (1-2):185-206.
    The hypothesis of group selection fell victim to a seemingly devastating critique in 1960s evolutionary biology. In Unto Others (1998), we argue to the contrary, that group selection is a conceptually coherent and empirically well documented cause of evolution. We suggest, in addition, that it has been especially important in human evolution. In the second part of Unto Others, we consider the issue of psychological egoism and altruism -- do human beings have ultimate motives concerning the well-being of others? We (...)
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  12.  78
    Species of Thought: A Comment on Evolutionary Epistemology.David Sloan Wilson - 1990 - Biology and Philosophy 5 (1):37-62.
    The primary outcome of natural selection is adaptation to an environment. The primary concern of epistemology is the acquistion of knowledge. Evolutionary epistemology must therefore draw a fundamental connection between adaptation and knowledge. Existing frameworks in evolutionary epistemology do this in two ways; (a) by treating adaptation as a form of knowledge, and (b) by treating the ability to acquire knowledge as a biologically evolved adaptation. I criticize both frameworks for failing to appreciate that mental representations can motivate behaviors that (...)
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  13.  7
    Beyond Belmont: Ensuring Respect for AI/AN Communities Through Tribal IRBs, Laws, and Policies.Sara Chandros Hull & David R. Wilson - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (7):60-62.
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  14. On the Inappropriate Use of the Naturalistic Fallacy in Evolutionary Psychology.Anne B. Clark, Eric Dietrich & David Sloan Wilson - 2003 - Biology and Philosophy 18 (5):669-81.
    The naturalistic fallacy is mentionedfrequently by evolutionary psychologists as anerroneous way of thinking about the ethicalimplications of evolved behaviors. However,evolutionary psychologists are themselvesconfused about the naturalistic fallacy and useit inappropriately to forestall legitimateethical discussion. We briefly review what thenaturalistic fallacy is and why it is misusedby evolutionary psychologists. Then we attemptto show how the ethical implications of evolvedbehaviors can be discussed constructivelywithout impeding evolutionary psychologicalresearch. A key is to show how ethicalbehaviors, in addition to unethical behaviors,can evolve by natural selection.
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  15.  14
    On the Inappropriate Use of the Naturalistic Fallacy in Evolutionary Psychology.David Wilson, Eric Dietrich & Anne Clark - 2003 - Biology and Philosophy 18 (5):669-681.
    The naturalistic fallacy is mentionedfrequently by evolutionary psychologists as anerroneous way of thinking about the ethicalimplications of evolved behaviors. However,evolutionary psychologists are themselvesconfused about the naturalistic fallacy and useit inappropriately to forestall legitimateethical discussion. We briefly review what thenaturalistic fallacy is and why it is misusedby evolutionary psychologists. Then we attemptto show how the ethical implications of evolvedbehaviors can be discussed constructivelywithout impeding evolutionary psychologicalresearch. A key is to show how ethicalbehaviors, in addition to unethical behaviors,can evolve by natural selection.
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  16.  30
    Testing Major Evolutionary Hypotheses About Religion with a Random Sample.David Sloan Wilson - 2005 - Human Nature 16 (4):382-409.
  17.  5
    Does Altruism Exist?: Culture, Genes, and the Welfare of Others.David Sloan Wilson - 2015 - Yale University Press.
    _A powerful treatise that demonstrates the existence of altruism in nature, with surprising implications for human society_ Does altruism exist? Or is human nature entirely selfish? In this eloquent and accessible book, famed biologist David Sloan Wilson provides new answers to this age-old question based on the latest developments in evolutionary science. From an evolutionary viewpoint, Wilson argues, altruism is inextricably linked to the functional organization of groups. “Groups that work” undeniably exist in nature and human society, although special conditions (...)
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  18. Language, Praxis, and the Right Hemisphere: Clues to Some Mechanisms of Consciousness.Michael S. Gazzaniga, J. E. LeDoux & David H. Wilson - 1977 - Neurology 27:1144-1147.
  19. Utilities of Gossip Across Organizational Levels.Kevin M. Kniffin & David Sloan Wilson - 2005 - Human Nature 16 (3):278-292.
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  20.  52
    Language as a Community of Interacting Belief Systems: A Case Study Involving Conduct Toward Self and Others. [REVIEW]David Sloan Wilson - 1995 - Biology and Philosophy 10 (1):77-97.
    Words such as selfish and altruistic that describe conduct toward self and others are notoriously ambiguous in everyday language. I argue that the ambiguity is caused, in part, by the coexistence of multiple belief systems that use the same words in different ways. Each belief system is a relatively coherent linguistic entity that provides a guide for human behavior. It is therefore a functional entity with design features that dictate specific word meaning. Since different belief systems guide human behavior in (...)
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  21.  15
    Gossip and Other Aspects of Language as Group-Level Adaptations.David Sloane Wilson, Carolyn Wilczynski, Alexandra Wells & Laura Weiser - 2000 - In Celia Heyes & Ludwig Huber (eds.), The Evolution of Cognition. MIT Press.
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  22.  14
    Levels of Selection: An Alternative to Individualism in Biology and the Human Sciences.David Sloan Wilson - 1994 - In E. Sober (ed.), Conceptual Issues in Evolutionary Biology. The Mit Press. Bradford Books.
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  23.  2
    Herschel and Whewell's Version of Newtonianism.David B. Wilson - 1974 - Journal of the History of Ideas 35 (1):79.
  24.  41
    Cognitive Cooperation.David Sloan Wilson, John J. Timmel & Ralph R. Miller - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (3):225-250.
    Cooperation can evolve in the context of cognitive activities such as perception, attention, memory, and decision making, in addition to physical activities such as hunting, gathering, warfare, and childcare. The social insects are well known to cooperate on both physical and cognitive tasks, but the idea of cognitive cooperation in humans has not received widespread attention or systematic study. The traditional psychological literature often gives the impression that groups are dysfunctional cognitive units, while evolutionary psychologists have so far studied cognition (...)
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  25.  13
    Multilevel Selection and the Social Transmission of Behavior.David Sloan Wilson & Kevin M. Kniffin - 1999 - Human Nature 10 (3):291-310.
    Many evolutionary models assume that behaviors are caused directly by genes. An implication is that behavioral uniformity should be found only in groups that are genetically uniform. Yet, the members of human social groups often behave in a uniform fashion, despite the fact that they are genetically diverse. Behavioral uniformity can occur through a variety of psychological mechanisms and social processes, such as imitation, consensus decision making, or the imposition of social norms. We present a series of models in which (...)
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  26.  13
    The Leading Edge of Leadership Studies.David Carl Wilson - 2018 - Philosophy of Management 17 (3):373-378.
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  27.  86
    Das Adam Smith Problem - A Critical Realist Perspective.David Wilson & William Dixon - 2006 - Journal of Critical Realism 5 (2):251-272.
    The old Das Adam Smith Problem is no longer tenable. Few today believe that Smith postulates two contradictory principles of human action: one in the Wealth of Nations and another in the Theory of Moral Sentiments . Nevertheless, an Adam Smith problem of sorts endures: there is still no widely agreed version of what it is that links these two texts, aside from their common author; no widely agreed version of how, if at all, Smith's postulation of self-interest as the (...)
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  28.  7
    Multilevel Selection and Tomasello’s A Natural History of Human Morality: A Translation Manual.David Sloan Wilson - 2018 - Philosophical Psychology 31 (5):669-679.
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  29.  51
    A Divided Mind: Observations of the Conscious Properties of the Separated Hemispheres.J. E. LeDoux, David H. Wilson & Michael S. Gazzaniga - 1977 - Annals of Neurology 2:417-21.
  30.  22
    Emotions and Actions Associated with Norm-Breaking Events.David Sloan Wilson & Rick O’Gorman - 2003 - Human Nature 14 (3):277-304.
    Norms have a strong influence on human social interactions, but the emotions and actions associated with norm-breaking events have not been systematically studied. We asked subjects to imagine themselves in a conflict situation and then to report how they would feel, how they would act, and how they would imagine the feelings and actions of their opponent. By altering the fictional scenario that they were asked to imagine (weak vs. strong norm) and the perspective of the subject (norm-breaker vs. the (...)
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  31.  37
    Perspectives and Parameterizations Commentary on Benjamin Kerr and Peter Godfrey-Smith's ``Individualist and Multi-Level Perspectives on Selection in Structured Populations''.Elliott Sober & David Sloan Wilson - 2002 - Biology and Philosophy 17 (4):529-537.
    We have two main objections to Kerr and Godfrey-Smith's (2002) meticulous analysis. First, they misunderstand the position we took in Unto Others – we do not claim that individual-level statements about the evolution of altruism are always unexplanatory and always fail to capture causal relationships. Second, Kerr and Godfrey-Smith characterize the individual and the multi-level perspectives in terms of different sets of parameters. In particular, they do not allow the multi-level perspective to use the individual fitness parameters i and i. (...)
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  32.  93
    A Critique of R.D. Alexander's Views on Group Selection.David Sloan Wilson - 1999 - Biology and Philosophy 14 (3):431-449.
    Group selection is increasingly being viewed as an important force in human evolution. This paper examines the views of R.D. Alexander, one of the most influential thinkers about human behavior from an evolutionary perspective, on the subject of group selection. Alexander's general conception of evolution is based on the gene-centered approach of G.C. Williams, but he has also emphasized a potential role for group selection in the evolution of individual genomes and in human evolution. Alexander's views are internally inconsistent and (...)
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  33.  24
    Nonphysical Souls Would Violate Physical Laws.David L. Wilson - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 349-367.
    This paper argues that nonphysical souls would violate fundamental physical laws if they were able to influence brain events. Though we have no idea how nonphysical souls might operate, we know quite a bit about how brains work, so we can consider each of the ways that an external force could interrupt brain processes enough to control one’s body. It concludes that there is no way that a nonphysical soul could interact with the brain—neither by introducing new energy into the (...)
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  34.  61
    Morality and ‘Unto Others': Response to Commentary Discussion.Elliott Sober & David Sloan Wilson - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (1-2):257-268.
    We address the following issues raised by the commentators of our target article and book: (1) the problem of multiple perspectives; (2) how to define group selection; (3) distinguishing between the concepts of altruism and organism; (4) genetic versus cultural group selection; (5) the dark side of group selection; (6) the relationship between psychological and evolutionary altruism; (7) the question of whether the psychological questions can be answered; (8) psychological experiments. We thank the contributors for their commentaries, which provide a (...)
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  35.  2
    When Everyone Wins? Exploring Employee and Customer Preferences for No-Haggle Pricing.Kevin M. Kniffin, Richard Reeves-Ellington & David S. Wilson - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  36.  31
    Das Adam Smith Problem: A Critical Realist Perspective.David Wilson & William Dixon - 2006 - Journal of Critical Realism 5 (2):251-272.
    _ Source: _Volume 5, Issue 2, pp 251 - 272 The old _Das Adam Smith Problem_ is no longer tenable. Few today believe that Smith postulates two contradictory principles of human action: one in the _Wealth of Nations_ and another in the _Theory of Moral Sentiments_. Nevertheless, an Adam Smith problem of sorts endures: there is still no widely agreed version of what it is that links these two texts, aside from their common author; no widely agreed version of how, (...)
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  37.  14
    George Gabriel Stokes on Stellar Aberration and the Luminiferous Ether.David B. Wilson - 1972 - British Journal for the History of Science 6 (1):57-72.
    Acceptance of Augustin Fresnel's wave theory of light posed numerous questions for early nineteenth-century physicists. Among the most pressing was the problem of the properties of the luminiferous ether. Fresnel had shown that light waves were transverse. Therefore, since, among ordinary materials, only solids support transverse vibrations, there existed striking likenesses between highly tangible solids and the highly intangible ether. Accordingly, such men as Augustin-Louis Cauchy, James MacCullagh, Franz Neumann, and George Green constructed various theories of an elastic-solid ether.1 At (...)
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  38. Racial Prejudice and the Performing Animals Controversy in Early Twentieth-Century Britain.David Wilson - 2009 - Society and Animals 17 (2):149-165.
    This paper attempts to show how racial prejudice and selective, usually inarticulate, racial discrimination influenced attempts to conduct an objective examination of charges of cruelty in the training and exhibition of performing animals in Britain in the early twentieth century. As the debate intensified, and following the appointment of a parliamentary Select Committee, one explanation often given by both sides for shortcomings in the treatment of performing animals was the alleged cruelty particularly or exclusively attributable to the “alien enemy,” “foreigners,” (...)
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  39.  19
    Groups as Units of Functional Analysis, Individuals as Proximate Mechanisms.David Sloan Wilson - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (3):279-280.
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  40.  8
    Butts on Whewell's View of True Causes.David B. Wilson - 1973 - Philosophy of Science 40 (1):121-124.
  41. Convergence: Metaphysical Pleasure Versus Physical Constraint.David B. Wilson - 1991 - In Menachem Fisch & Simon Schaffer (eds.), William Whewell: A Composite Portrait. Clarendon Press. pp. 233--54.
     
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  42. By The Finger of God: Demon Possession and Exorcism in Early Christianity in the Light of Modern Views of Mental Illness.S. Vernon McCasland & David Cole Wilson - 1951
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  43.  27
    Functionalism and Moral Personhood: One View Considered.David C. Wilson - 1984 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 44 (June):521-530.
    Daniel dennett has offered a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for something's being the proper object of our moral commitment, That is, For something's being a person. Strict application of these largely pragmatic conditions, However, Would result in a moral community with quite a surprising membership roster, Because of both who is on it and who isn't. The problem is that "your" being a person should amount to more than a function of "my" goals and cleverness.
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  44.  14
    On the Nature of Consciousness and of Physical Reality.David L. Wilson - 1976 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 19 (4):568-581.
  45.  5
    Seeking Nature's Logic: Natural Philosophy in the Scottish Enlightenment.David B. Wilson - 2009 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    "Studies the path of natural philosophy (i.e., physics) from Isaac Newton through Scotland into the nineteenth-century background to the modern revolution in physics.
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  46.  17
    Animal Psychology and Ethology in Britain and the Emergence of Professional Concern for the Concept of Ethical Cost.David A. H. Wilson - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 33 (2):235-262.
    It has been argued that if an animal is psychologically like us, there may be more scientific reason to experiment upon it, but less moral justification to do so. Some scientists deny the existence of this dilemma, claiming that although there are scientifically valuable similarities between humans and animals that make experimentation worthwhile, humans are at the same time unique and fundamentally different. This latter response is, ironically, typical of pre-Darwinian beliefs in the relationship between human and non-human animals. Another (...)
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  47.  9
    Suicide, Beanbag Genetics, and Pleiotropy.David Sloan Wilson - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (2):283-283.
  48.  49
    Group Selection: The Theory Replaces the Bogey Man.David Sloan Wilson & Elliott Sober - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):639-654.
    In both biology and the human sciences, social groups are sometimes treated as adaptive units whose organization cannot be reduced to individual interactions. This group-level view is opposed by a more individualistic one that treats social organization as a byproduct of self-interest. According to biologists, group-level adaptations can evolve only by a process of natural selection at the group level. Most biologists rejected group selection as an important evolutionary force during the 1960s and 1970s but a positive literature began to (...)
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  49.  9
    Quantum Theory and Consciousness.David L. Wilson - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):615-616.
  50.  41
    Sociopathy Within and Between Small Groups.David Sloan Wilson - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):577-577.
    If sociopathy is a biological adaptation, it probably evolved in small social groups in which individuals lacked the social mobility required for a con-man strategy to work. On the other hand, conflicts between groups may have provided a large niche for sociopathy throughout human history.
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