Results for 'David Strang'

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  1. Institutional conditions for diffusion.David Strang & John W. Meyer - 1993 - Theory and Society 22 (4):487-511.
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  2.  8
    Peer Review and Scholarly Originality: Let 1,000 Flowers Bloom, but Don’t Step on Any.David Strang & Kyle Siler - 2017 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 42 (1):29-61.
    We examine the criticisms and subsequent changes that arise in the course of peer review. Fifty-two scholars who had recently published in Administrative Science Quarterly were surveyed regarding their peer review experience and how their article changed from initial journal submission to eventual publication. Papers that challenged theoretical perspectives faced distinctively high levels of criticism and change, particularly with attention to methodology, while those that offered a new perspective or that extended or combined established perspectives were less criticized and changed. (...)
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  3. A Strange Kind of Power: Vetter on the Formal Adequacy of Dispositionalism.David Yates - 2020 - Philosophical Inquiries 8 (1):97-116.
    According to dispositionalism about modality, a proposition <p> is possible just in case something has, or some things have, a power or disposition for its truth; and <p> is necessary just in case nothing has a power for its falsity. But are there enough powers to go around? In Yates (2015) I argued that in the case of mathematical truths such as <2+2=4>, nothing has the power to bring about their falsity or their truth, which means they come out both (...)
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  4. Emergence and strange attractors.David V. Newman - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (2):245-61.
    Recent work in the Philosophy of Mind has suggested that alternatives to reduction are required in order to explain the relationship between psychology and biology or physics. Emergence has been proposed as one such alternative. In this paper, I propose a precise definition of emergence, and I argue that chaotic systems provide concrete examples of properties that meet this definition. In particular, I suggest that being in the basin of attraction of a strange attractor is an emergent property of any (...)
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  5.  26
    The strangeness of the phaedrus.David J. Schenker - 2006 - American Journal of Philology 127 (1):67-87.
  6.  72
    Haig’s ‘strange inversion of reasoning’ and Making sense: information interpreted as meaning.David Haig & Daniel Dennett - unknown
    David Haig propounds and illustrates the unity of a radically revised set of definitions of the family of terms at the heart of philosophy of cognitive science and mind: information, meaning, interpretation, text, choice, possibility, cause. This biological re-grounding of much-debated concepts yields a bounty of insights into the nature of meaning and life. An interpreter is a mechanism that uses information in choice. The capabilities of the interpreter couple an entropy of inputs to an entropy of outputs is (...)
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  7. The strange case of the man who took 40,000 ecstasy pills in nine years.David McCandless - unknown
    Doctors from London University have revealed details of what they believe is the largest amount of ecstasy ever consumed by a single person. Consultants from the addiction centre at St George's Medical School, London, have published a case report of a British man estimated to have taken around 40,000 pills of MDMA, the active ingredient in ecstasy, over nine years. The heaviest previous lifetime intake on record is 2,000 pills. Though the man, who is now 37, stopped taking the drug (...)
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  8.  8
    Where Does The Weirdness Go?: Why Quantum Mechanics Is Strange, But Not As Strange As You Think.David Lindley - 2008
    Few revolutions in science have been more far-reaching--but less understood--than the quantum revolution in physics. Everyday experience cannot prepare us for the sub-atomic world, where quantum effects become all-important. Here, particles can look like waves, and vice versa; electrons seem to lose their identity and instead take on a shifting, unpredictable appearance that depends on how they are being observed; and a single photon may sometimes behave as if it could be in two places at once. In the world of (...)
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  9.  19
    Foreign Bodies in Strange Places: A Note on Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Georges Bataille, and Architecture.David Farrell Krell - 1991 - Philosophy Today 35 (1):43-50.
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  10.  73
    How does anybody live in this strange place? A reply to Samantha Vice.David Benatar - 2012 - South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):619-361.
    This article builds on Samantha Vice’s argument on the problem of whiteness in contemporary South Africa. I will explore the thesis of invisibility regarding whiteness and argue for its relevance to the rich per se. This thesis demonstrates how white privilege and affluence, despite being glaringly visible in a concrete sense, is rendered invisible together with the mostly black poverty by which it is contrasted. The invisibility of whiteness translates and flows into the so-called ‘invisibility of richness’, which involves anyone (...)
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  11.  55
    Security of infantile attachment as assessed in the “strange situation”: Its study and biological interpretation.Michael E. Lamb, Ross A. Thompson, William P. Gardner, Eric L. Charnov & David Estes - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):127-147.
    The Strange Situation procedure was developed by Ainsworth two decades agoas a means of assessing the security of infant-parent attachment. Users of the procedureclaim that it provides a way of determining whether the infant has developed species-appropriate adaptive behavior as a result of rearing in an evolutionary appropriate context, characterized by a sensitively responsive parent. Only when the parent behaves in the sensitive, species-appropriate fashion is the baby said to behave in the adaptive or secure fashion. Furthermore, when infants are (...)
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  12.  72
    My Own Life.David Hume - 1927 - Mill House Press.
    In a final, short summary of his life and works, David Hume wrote My Own Life as he suffered from gastrointestinal issues that ultimately killed him. Despite his bleak prognosis, Hume remains lighthearted and inspirational throughout. He discusses his life growing up, his family relationships, and his desire to constantly improve his works and his reputation as an author. He confesses, "I have suffered very little pain from my disorder; and what is more strange, have... never suffered a moment's (...)
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  13. On Being a Random Sample.David Manley - manuscript
    It is well known that de se (or ‘self-locating’) propositions complicate the standard picture of how we should respond to evidence. This has given rise to a substantial literature centered around puzzles like Sleeping Beauty, Dr. Evil, and Doomsday—and it has also sparked controversy over a style of argument that has recently been adopted by theoretical cosmologists. These discussions often dwell on intuitions about a single kind of case, but it’s worth seeking a rule that can unify our treatment of (...)
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  14.  4
    Strange Talk. [REVIEW]David Bain - 2001 - The Classical Review 51 (1):14-15.
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  15.  27
    Strange Talk S. Colvin: Dialect in Aristophanes. The Politics of Language in Ancient Greek Literature . Pp. xii + 347. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1999. Cased, £48. ISBN: 0-19-815249-. [REVIEW]David Bain - 2001 - The Classical Review 51 (01):14-.
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  16. Norton’s Slippery Slope.David B. Malament - 2008 - Philosophy of Science 75 (5):799-816.
    In my contribution to the Symposium ("On the Vagaries of Determinism and Indeterminism"), I will identify several issues that arise in trying to decide whether Newtonian particle mechanics qualifies as a deterministic theory. I'll also give a mini-tutorial on the geometry and dynamical properties of Norton's dome surface. The goal is to better understand how his example works, and better appreciate just how wonderfully strange it is.
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  17. Aristotle on the Matter for Birth, Life, and the Elements.David Ebrey - 2020 - In Liba Taub (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Science. Cambridge, UK: pp. 79-101.
    This essay considers three case studies of Aristotle’s use of matter, drawn from three different scientific contexts: menstrual fluid as the matter of animal generation in the Generation of Animals, the living body as matter of an organism in Aristotle’s On the Soul (De Anima), and the matter of elemental transformation in Generation and Corruption. I argue that Aristotle conceives of matter differently in these treatises (1) because of the different sorts of changes under consideration, and (2) because sometimes he (...)
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  18.  5
    Emptiness: the beauty and wisdom of absence.David Arthur Auten - 2017 - Eugene, Oregon: Cascade Books.
    Emptiness is a strange phenomenon that haunts us in many ways. Most of us have felt empty at one time or another, though we don’t often talk about it. We have a sense that something is missing in life. This absence extends beyond human experience to the physical world. As contemporary science has revealed to us on both a macroscopic and subatomic level, curiously, the vast majority of the universe is composed mostly of nothing but empty space. Emptiness is “abundant” (...)
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  19. Reflections of a reluctant clinical ethicist: Ethics consultation and the collapse of critical distance.David Barnard - 1992 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 13 (1).
    The obvious appeal and growing momentum of clinical ethics in academic medical centers should not blind us to a potential danger: the collapse of critical distance. The very integration into the clinical milieu and the processes of clinical decision making, that clinical ethics claims as its greatest success, carries the seeds of a dilution of ethics' critical stance toward medicine and medical education. The purpose of this paper is to suggest how this might occur, and what potential contributions of ethics (...)
     
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  20. A New Look at the Prime Mover.David Bradshaw - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (1):1-22.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:A New Look at the Prime MoverDavid BradshawThe last twenty years have seen a notable shift in scholarly views on the Prime Mover. Once widely dismissed as a relic of Aristotle's early Platonism, the Prime Mover is coming increasingly to be seen as a key—perhaps the key—to Aristotle's mature metaphysics and philosophy of mind. Perhaps the best example of the revisionist view is Jonathan Lear's Aristotle: The Desire to (...)
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  21.  8
    The Yoga Sutra of Patanjali: a biography.David Gordon White - 2014 - Princeton: Princeton University Press.
    Consisting of fewer than two hundred verses written in an obscure if not impenetrable language and style, Patanjali's Yoga Sutra is today extolled by the yoga establishment as a perennial classic and guide to yoga practice. As David Gordon White demonstrates in this groundbreaking study, both of these assumptions are incorrect. Virtually forgotten in India for hundreds of years and maligned when it was first discovered in the West, the Yoga Sutra has been elevated to its present iconic status--and (...)
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  22.  7
    Senses of Mystery: Engaging with Nature and the Meaning of Life.David Edward Cooper - 2017 - New York: Routledge.
    In this beautifully written book David E. Cooper uses a gentle walk through a tropical garden, the view of the fields and hills beyond it, the sound of birds, voices and flute, the reflection of light in water, the play of shadows among the trees and presence of strange animals, as an opportunity to reflect on experiences of nature and the mystery of existence. Covering an extensive range of topics, from Daoism to dogs, from gardening to walking, from Zen (...)
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  23.  23
    Hume's Mistake — Another Guess.David Raynor - 1981 - Hume Studies 7 (2):164-166.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:164. HUME'S MISTAKE — ANOTHER GUESS Richard Price's first biographer reports that David Hume once "candidly acknowledged that on one point Mr. Price had succeeded in convincing him that his arguments were inconclusive; but it does not appear that Mr. Hume, in consequence of this conviction, made any alteration in the subsequent edition of his Essays." It has 2 been suggested that Hume's avowed mistake is to be (...)
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  24.  38
    Species Nova [To See Anew]: Art as Ecology.David Haley - 2003 - Ethics and the Environment 8 (1):143 - 150.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Ethics & the Environment 8.1 (2003) 143-150 [Access article in PDF] Species Nova [To See Anew]Art as Ecology David Haley Looking Back From space, looking back at earth, we may see three key issues: the accelerating increase of the human species, the accelerating decrease of other species, and the accelerating effects of climate change. We might ask, how are we to cope with these changes creatively?That our societies (...)
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  25.  17
    Species Nova [].David Haley - 2003 - Ethics and the Environment 8 (1):143-150.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Ethics & the Environment 8.1 (2003) 143-150 [Access article in PDF] Species Nova [To See Anew]Art as Ecology David Haley Looking Back From space, looking back at earth, we may see three key issues: the accelerating increase of the human species, the accelerating decrease of other species, and the accelerating effects of climate change. We might ask, how are we to cope with these changes creatively?That our societies (...)
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  26.  14
    Species Nova [To See Anew]: Art as Ecology.David Haley - 2003 - Ethics and the Environment 8 (1):143-150.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Ethics & the Environment 8.1 (2003) 143-150 [Access article in PDF] Species Nova [To See Anew]Art as Ecology David Haley Looking Back From space, looking back at earth, we may see three key issues: the accelerating increase of the human species, the accelerating decrease of other species, and the accelerating effects of climate change. We might ask, how are we to cope with these changes creatively?That our societies (...)
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  27.  36
    Regressus and Empiricism in the Controversy about Galileo’s Lunar Observations.David Marshall Miller - 2018 - Perspectives on Science 26 (3):293-324.
    One of the distinctive features of modern science is a commitment to empiricism—a fundamental expectation that theoretical hypotheses will survive encounters with observations. Those that comport with the theory's explanations and predictions confirm the theory. Anomalous observations that do not fit theoretical expectations disconfirm it. Moreover, experiments can be contrived to generate observations that might serve to confirm or disconfirm a theory. Philosophers of science may disagree as to how exactly all of this is supposed to work, but the basic (...)
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  28. Robust moral realism: an excellent religion.David Killoren - 2016 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 79 (3):223-237.
    According to robust moral realism, there exist objective, non-natural moral facts. Moral facts of this sort do not fit easily into the world as illuminated by natural science. Further, if such facts exist at all, it is hard to see how we could know of their existence by any familiar means. Yet robust realists are not moral skeptics; they believe that we do know the moral facts. Thus robust moral realism comes with a number of hard-to-defend ontological and epistemological commitments. (...)
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  29.  9
    Lermontov and the omniscience of narrators.David A. Goldfarb - 1996 - Philosophy and Literature 20 (1):61-74.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Lermontov And The Omniscience Of NarratorsDavid A. GoldfarbGod and fictional narrators are the only beings who are sometimes considered omniscient. God, who is sometimes regarded as not fictional, is frequently also regarded as omnipotent. Narrators, who normally seem to have no sphere of action save for conveying information to readers, particularly when they speak omnisciently in the third person, are not considered to have “power” in any way, because (...)
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  30.  8
    Dialogues concerning natural religion.David Hume & Norman Kemp Smith - 1991 - Ann Arbor, Mich.: Caravan Books. Edited by Stanley Tweyman.
    It Seems Strange To Me, Said Cleanthes, That You, Demea, Who Are So Sincere In The Cause Of Religion, Should Still Maintain The Mysterious, Incomprehensible Nature Of The Deity, And Should Insist So Strenuously That He Has No Manner Of Likeness Or Resemblance To Human Creatures. The Deity, I Can Readily Allow, Possesses Many Powers And Attributes Of Which We Can Have No Comprehension.
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  31. From Yijing to Copenhagen Interpretation of Quantum Physics.David Leong - manuscript
    In the quest and search for a physical theory of everything from the macroscopic large body matter to the microscopic elementary particles, with strange and weird concepts springing from quantum physics discovery, irreconcilable positions and inconvenient facts complicated physics – from Newtonian physics to quantum science, the question is- how do we close the gap? Indeed, there is a scientific and mathematical fireworks when the issue of quantum uncertainties and entanglements cannot be explained with classical physics. The Copenhagen interpretation is (...)
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  32.  27
    "We the Others": Interpretive Community and Plural Voice in Herodotus.David Chamberlain - 2001 - Classical Antiquity 20 (1):5-34.
    When Herodotus uses the first person plural in phrases like "We know," "We say," and so on, the modern reader naturally takes this either to refer to his ethnic group or to be something like the scholarly first person plural: an appeal to consensus among a group of qualied experts. Neither is the case. Only once does Herodotus' "we" refer to the Greeks as a group; in virtually every other instance it must be interpreted as plural for singular. It refers, (...)
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  33.  21
    Review of : Cannibalism and the Common Law: The Story of the Tragic Last Voyage of the "Mignonette" and the Strange Legal Proceedings to Which It Gave Rise[REVIEW]David Braybrooke & Judith Fingard - 1985 - Ethics 95 (3):745-747.
  34. On Reason and Spectral Machines: Robert Brandom and Bounded Posthumanism.David Roden - 2017 - In Rosi Braidotti & Rick Dolphijn (eds.), Philosophy After Nature. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield International. pp. 99-119.
    I distinguish two theses regarding technological successors to current humans (posthumans): an anthropologically bounded posthumanism (ABP) and an anthropologically unbounded posthumanism (AUP). ABP proposes transcendental conditions on agency that can be held to constrain the scope for “weirdness” in the space of possible posthumans a priori. AUP, by contrast, leaves the nature of posthuman agency to be settled empirically (or technologically). Given AUP there are no “future proof” constraints on the strangeness of posthuman agents. -/- In Posthuman Life I defended (...)
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  35.  39
    What’s It Like to Be a Universe: Implications of Being In, Of, and About a Brain, or a Speculative Panconsciousness Approach to Quantum Nonlocality.David Robert Gruber - 2022 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 36 (3):323-339.
    ABSTRACT The problem of quantum nonlocality references instantaneous entanglements happening between particles at great distances, putting under question physical assumptions about time and local effects. Despite a wide range of proposed solutions in physics, the problem persists; however, due to the recent interest in panconsciousness and panpsychism in philosophy as well as numerous suggestions that consciousness and quantum physics are intimately related, I argue in favor of thinking strange quantum effects—and nonlocality as case in point—in lieu of conscious activity happening (...)
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  36.  8
    Berdyaev’s Philosophy of History: An Existentialist Theory of Social Creativity and Eschatology.David Bonner Richardson - 1968 - The Hague,: Springer.
    BERDYAEV AS A PHILOSOPHER How shall a non-Russian, above all a North American, assimilate the extraordinary assemblage of ideas which is Berdyaev's philosophy? Dr. Richardson does not exaggerate the difficulties. And he introduces us with great care (and what a formidable task it must have been) precisely to what is most strange in this writer, his fusion of historical.. eschatological-metaphysical-mystical-Christian conceptions. By some standards Berdyaev is a theologian rather than a philosopher; for he takes the truth of the Christian revelation (...)
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  37.  15
    Sudden Music: Improvisation, Sound, Nature.David Rothenberg (ed.) - 2016 - University of Georgia Press.
    Music, said Zen patriarch Hui Neng, "is a means of rapid transformation." It takes us home to a natural world that functions outside of logic, where harmony and dissonance, tension and release work in surprising ways. Weaving memoir, travelogue, and philosophical reflection, Sudden Music presents a musical way of knowing that can closely engage us with the world and open us to its spontaneity.Improvisation is everywhere, says David Rothenberg, and his book is a testament to its creative, surprising power. (...)
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  38.  26
    On the Way to Econstruction.David Wood - 2006 - Environmental Philosophy 3 (1):35-46.
    Environmentalism finds itself facing problems and aporiae which deconstruction helps us address. But equally, environmental concerns can embolden deconstruction to embrace a strategic materialism – the essential interruptibility of every idealization. Moreover, deconstruction’s critique of presence opens us to the strange temporalities of environmentalism: needing to act before we have proof, and for the benefit of future humans. The history of the earth is a singular sequence, ideographic – concrete, not rule governed, and not to be repeated. French ‘anti-humanism’ is (...)
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  39.  13
    The Law of the Stranger.David Janssens - 2006 - Ethical Perspectives 13 (3):383-410.
    Waldenfels’ reception of the Platonic dialogues is markedly ambivalent. On the one hand, Plato recurrently appears as a major philosophical antagonist. Like Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Derrida, Waldenfels charges Plato with having fettered Socrates’ boundless questioning to a closed meta- physical system in which there is no place for the strange. On the other hand, he occasionally hints at an “other,” more Socratic Plato whose thought he seems to view as much more akin to his own. This “other” Plato, however, plays (...)
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  40.  8
    Perloff's Wittgenstein: W(h)ither Poetic Theory?David Kellogg - 1996 - Diacritics 26 (3/4):67-85.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Perloff’s Wittgenstein: W(h)ither Poetic Theory?David Kellogg (bio)Though Marjorie Perloff has been one of the most powerful forces in contemporary poetry studies for some time, her work has not received the critical attention it warrants. Her latest book, Wittgenstein’s Ladder: Poetic Language and the Strangeness of the Ordinary, provides an opportunity for reflection on a body of writing remarkable both in its consistency and its constant reinvention. Indeed, reading (...)
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  41. The warring twins: sociology, cultural studies, alterity and sameness.David Inglis - 2007 - History of the Human Sciences 20 (2):99-122.
    Of all sociology's `strange others', cultural studies is perhaps the least unfamiliar to many sociologists. Yet cultural studies exists in one of the most ambiguous relationships with sociology of any academic discipline. In this article, it is argued that the complicated nature of the relationship is compelled by the very closeness of the two participants in it. What often seems to be an ongoing state of ritualized antagonism between them flows not from their ostensible differences but in fact from their (...)
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  42. Jessie Left.David Kennedy - 1994 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 15 (1).
    Late afternoon winter light entered the room obliquely, striking the seven asembled there as if in some final reckoning. They sat around the oblong table slumped in the padded chairs, exhausted, but strangely poised. No one had spoken since Jesse slammed out.
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  43.  7
    Legal Dimensions in Gene Ownership.David Koepsell - 2015-03-19 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), Who Owns You? Wiley. pp. 83–100.
    This chapter contains sections titled: The Role of the Law Autonomy and Property Early Cases on Microorganisms and Animals: The Slope toward Human Patents Patenting Animals Renting Your Spleen? The Move to Human Gene Patents Patenting Diseases Catalona and Beyond What's so Strange about the Law of Bodies and Tissues? The Law of Personal Identity Reconciling the Law with Reality.
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  44.  19
    The warring twins.David Inglis - 2007 - History of the Human Sciences 20 (2):99-122.
    Of all sociology's `strange others', cultural studies is perhaps the least unfamiliar to many sociologists. Yet cultural studies exists in one of the most ambiguous relationships with sociology of any academic discipline. In this article, it is argued that the complicated nature of the relationship is compelled by the very closeness of the two participants in it. What often seems to be an ongoing state of ritualized antagonism between them flows not from their ostensible differences but in fact from their (...)
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  45.  41
    Through a (First) Contact Lens Darkly: Arrival, Unreal Time and Chthulucinema.David H. Fleming & William Brown - 2018 - Film-Philosophy 22 (3):340-363.
    Science fiction is often held up as a particularly philosophical genre. For, beyond actualising mind-experiment-like fantasies, science fiction films also commonly toy with speculative ideas, or else engineer encounters with the strange and unknown. Denis Villeneuve's Arrival is a contemporary science fiction film that does exactly this, by introducing Lovecraft-esque tentacular aliens whose arrival on Earth heralds in a novel, but ultimately paralysing, inhuman perspective on the nature of time and reality. This article shows how this cerebral film invites viewers (...)
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  46. Life's too short to pretend you're not religious.David Dark - 2016 - Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press.
    Religion happens -- Crackers and grape juice -- Attention collection -- Choose your ancestors carefully -- I learned it by watching you -- Hurry up and matter! -- The web, the net, and the verse -- The chother -- Policy is liturgy writ large -- Strange negotiations.
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  47.  22
    You make my heart sing.David Rothenberg - 2003 - Ethics and the Environment 8 (1):112-125.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Ethics & the Environment 8.1 (2003) 112-125 [Access article in PDF] You Make My Heart Sing David Rothenberg Last March I went to Pittsburgh to play music live with birds. The plan was to arrive at dawn, to catch the wary singers at their best—in the early morning chorus, when the most sound was happening. I met my friend Michael Pestel at the gates of the National Aviary, (...)
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  48.  8
    William Poteat.David W. Rutledge - 2013 - Tradition and Discovery 40 (2):36-45.
    This essay provides an overview of Poteat’s thought, beginning with his basic problem of the eradication of the embodied person from accounts of human knowing in the critical tradition. Poteat’s analysis of the move from “place” to “space” as the arena of living shows his procedure. I isolate six elements of the recovery of the person in his work: the necessity of his strange vocabulary, the need to embed knowing in time, the primacy of speech over writing, the centrality of (...)
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  49. Epistemic freedom.J. David Velleman - 1989 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 70 (1):73-97.
    Epistemic freedom is the freedom to affirm anyone of several incompatible propositions without risk of being wrong. We sometimes have this freedom, strange as it seems, and our having it sheds some light on the topic of free will and determinism. This paper sketches a potential explanation for our feeling of freedom. The freedom that I postulate is not causal but epistemic (in a sense that I shall define), and the result is that it is quite compatible with determinism. I (...)
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  50.  9
    Three Last Dubious Projects.David Farrell Krell - 2020 - Research in Phenomenology 50 (3):407-424.
    The article discusses three research projects that I may never undertake: a genealogy of Nietzsche interpretations devolving from Bataille and Heidegger; a discussion of Derrida’s strange mix of biology and biography in his work on Nietzsche; and an account of meetings I had on various occasions with Heidegger, Arendt, and Derrida.
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