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  1. Wittgenstein on mind and language.David G. Stern - 1995 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Drawing on ten years of research on the unpublished Wittgenstein papers, Stern investigates what motivated Wittgenstein's philosophical writing and casts new light on the Tractatus and Philosophical Investigations. The book is an exposition of Wittgenstein's early conception of the nature of representation and how his later revision and criticism of that work led to a radically different way of looking at mind and language. It also explains how the unpublished manuscripts and typescripts were put together and why they often provide (...)
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  2.  72
    Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations: An Introduction.David G. Stern - 2004 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    In this new introduction to a classic philosophical text, David Stern examines Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations. He gives particular attention to both the arguments of the Investigations and the way in which the work is written, and especially to the role of dialogue in the book. While he concentrates on helping the reader to arrive at his or her own interpretation of the primary text, he also provides guidance to the unusually wide range of existing interpretations, and to the reasons why (...)
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  3.  66
    The Cambridge Companion to Wittgenstein.Hans D. Sluga & David G. Stern (eds.) - 1996 - Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
    Ludwig Wittgenstein is one of the most important, influential, and often-cited philosophers of the twentieth century, yet he remains one of its most elusive and least accessible. The essays in this volume address central themes in Wittgenstein's writings on the philosophy of mind, language, logic, and mathematics. They chart the development of his work and clarify the connections between its different stages. The contributors illuminate the character of the whole body of work by keeping a tight focus on some key (...)
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  4. Wittgenstein's Method: Neglected Aspects.Gordon Baker, Ilham Dilman & David G. Stern - 2005 - Philosophy 80 (313):432-455.
     
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  5. Models of memory: Wittgenstein and cognitive science.David G. Stern - 1991 - Philosophical Psychology 4 (2):203-18.
  6. Wittgenstein’s Place in Twentieth-Century Analytic Philosophy.David G. Stern & P. M. S. Hacker - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (3):449.
    Originally conceived as a forty-page conclusion to Hacker’s twenty years of work on the monumental four-volume Analytical Commentary on the Philosophical Investigations, this book “rapidly assumed a life of its own”. A major contribution to the history of analytic philosophy, this substantial volume delivers even more than the title promises. The eight chapters are best approached as a six-chapter book, itself some 220 pages long, on Wittgenstein’s contribution to twentieth-century philosophy, followed by a two-chapter, 120-page epilogue about how and why (...)
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  7.  36
    Ethics and professionalism: What does a resident need to learn?Susan Dorr Goold & David T. Stern - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):9 – 17.
    Training in ethics and professionalism is a fundamental component of residency education, yet there is little empirical information to guide curricula. The objective of this study is to describe empirically derived ethics objectives for ethics and professionalism training for multiple specialties. Study design is a thematic analysis of documents, semi-structured interviews, and focus groups conducted in a setting of an academic medical center, Veterans Administration, and community hospital training more than 1000 residents. Participants were 84 informants in 13 specialties including (...)
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  8.  27
    The Later Wittgenstein: The Emergence of a New Philosophical Method.David G. Stern & S. Stephen Hilmy - 1990 - Philosophical Review 99 (4):639.
  9.  50
    The University of Iowa Tractatus Map.David G. Stern - 2016 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 5 (2):203-220.
    Drawing on recent work on the nature of the numbering system of the _Tractatus_ and Wittgenstein’s use of that system in his composition of the _Prototractatus_, the paper sets out the rationale for the online tool called__ __ The University of Iowa Tractatus Map. The map consists of a website with a front page that links to two separate subway-style maps of the hypertextual numbering system Wittgenstein used in his _Tractatus_. One map displays the structure of the published _Tractatus_; the (...)
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  10.  41
    How Many Wittgensteins?David G. Stern - 2006 - In Alois Pichler & Simo Säätelä (eds.), Wittgenstein: The Philosopher and his Works. Ontos Verlag.
    The paper maps out and responds to some of the main areas of disagreement over the nature of Wittgenstein’s philosophy: (1) Between defenders of a “two Wittgensteins” reading (which draws a sharp distinction between early and late Wittgenstein) and the opposing “one Wittgenstein” interpretation. (2) Among “two-Wittgensteins” interpreters as to when the later philosophy emerged, and over the central difference between early and late Wittgenstein. (3) Between those who hold that Wittgenstein opposes only past philosophy in order to do philosophy (...)
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  11.  42
    The Practical Turn.David G. Stern - 2003 - In Stephen P. Turner & Paul Roth (eds.), The Blackwell Guidebook to the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Blackwell. pp. 11--185.
  12. The availability of Wittgenstein's philosophy.David G. Stern - 1996 - In Hans D. Sluga & David G. Stern (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Wittgenstein. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  13.  4
    The Practical Turn.David G. Stern - 2003 - In Stephen P. Turner & Paul A. Roth (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 185–206.
    This chapter contains sections titled: What is Practice Theory? What is a Practice? Being‐in‐the‐World and Practical Holism Two Philosophers and an Antiphilosophy: Kripkenstein, Winchgenstein, and Therapeutic Quietism Winchgensteinian Practice Theory From Winchgenstein to Frankenstein Investigating Practices Note.
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  14. Private Language.David Stern - 2011 - In Marie McGinn & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Wittgenstein. Oxford University Press.
    Ludwig Wittgenstein's treatment of private language has received more attention than any other aspect of his philosophy. Yet, for more than fifty years, a remarkably self-contained exegetical tradition has defined the terms of debate and the principal positions that are discussed. Orthodox interpreters hold that the proof that a private language is impossible turns on showing it is ruled out by some set of systematic philosophical commitments about logic, meaning, and knowledge. Leading candidates for this ground on which the argument (...)
     
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  15.  14
    Wittgenstein: Lectures, Cambridge 1930-1933: From the Notes of G. E. Moore.David G. Stern, Brian Rogers & Gabriel Citron (eds.) - 2016 - Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.
    This edition of G. E. Moore's notes taken at Wittgenstein's seminal Cambridge lectures in the early 1930s provides, for the first time, an almost verbatim record of those classes. The presentation of the notes is both accessible and faithful to their original manuscripts, and a comprehensive introduction and synoptic table of contents provide the reader with essential contextual information and summaries of the topics in each lecture. The lectures form an excellent introduction to Wittgenstein's middle-period thought, covering a broad range (...)
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  16.  86
    The “middle wittgenstein”: From logical atomism to practical holism.David Stern - 1991 - Synthese 87 (2):203 - 226.
  17.  29
    Wittgenstein in the 1930s: Between the Tractatus and the Investigations.David G. Stern (ed.) - 2018 - New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    Wittgenstein's 'middle period' is often seen as a transitional phase connecting his better-known early and later philosophies. The fifteen essays in this volume focus both on the distinctive character of his teaching and writing in the 1930s, and on its pivotal importance for an understanding of his philosophy as a whole. They offer wide-ranging perspectives on the central issue of how best to identify changes and continuities in his philosophy during those years, as well as on particular topics in the (...)
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  18. Wittgenstein, the Vienna Circle, and physicalism: A reassessment.David G. Stern - 2007 - In Alan Richardson & Thomas Uebel (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Logical Empiricism. Cambridge University Press. pp. 305--31.
    The "standard account" of Wittgenstein’s relations with the Vienna Circle is that the early Wittgenstein was a principal source and inspiration for the Circle’s positivistic and scientific philosophy, while the later Wittgenstein was deeply opposed to the logical empiricist project of articulating a "scientific conception of the world." However, this telegraphic summary is at best only half-true and at worst deeply misleading. For it prevents us appreciating the fluidity and protean character of their philosophical dialogue. In retrospectively attributing clear-cut positions (...)
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  19. Another strand in the private language argument.David Stern - 2010 - In Arif Ahmed (ed.), Wittgenstein's Philosophical investigations: a critical guide. New York: Cambridge University Press.
    The title of this chapter is borrowed from John McDowell's ‘One strand in the private language argument’ (1998b). In that paper, he argues that much of what is best in Wittgenstein's discussion of private language can be seen as a development of the Kantian insight that there is no such thing as an unconceptualized experience - that even the most elementary sensation must have a conceptual aspect. On McDowell's view, a sensation is a ‘perfectly good something - an object, if (...)
     
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  20.  70
    The return of the subject?: Power, reflexivity and agency.David Stern - 2000 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 26 (5):109-122.
    The deconstruction of the subject associated with postmodernism cannot be said to have simply carried the day. Opponents and critics of postmodernism have held that we must return to the subject and to autonomy as a necessary condition of thinking about ethics, politics, agency and responsibility. Indeed, Peter Dews has recently argued that efforts to displace the subject repeat rather than dissolve the problems generated by subject-centered theories, a charge he takes to be devastating. The implications of this return to (...)
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  21. Wittgenstein and Moore on grammar.David G. Stern - 2018 - In Wittgenstein in the 1930s: Between the Tractatus and the Investigations. Cambridge University Press.
  22. Practices, practical holism, and background practices.David G. Stern - 2000 - In Mark Wrathall & Jeff Malpas (eds.), Heidegger, Coping, and Cognitive Science: Essays in Honor of Hubert L. Dreyfus, Volume 2. MIT Press.
  23.  7
    Wittgenstein's Texts and Style.David G. Stern - 2017 - In Hans-Johann Glock & John Hyman (eds.), A Companion to Wittgenstein. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 41–55.
    Wittgenstein's principal works, the Tractatus Logico‐Philosophicus and Philosophical Investigations, are each written in such strikingly unconventional ways that it takes considerable effort to translate them into conventional philosophical writing. The most important aspect of Wittgenstein's style for an understanding of his philosophy is his use of multiple voices, and the way he forces his reader to engage with those voices in order to understand him. This chapter provides an outline of the leading macro‐level answers to the question which of Wittgenstein's (...)
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  24. Moore’s Notes on Wittgenstein’s Lectures, Cambridge 1930-1933: Text, Context, and Content.David G. Stern, Gabriel Citron & Brian Rogers - 2013 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review (1):161-179.
    Wittgenstein’s writings and lectures during the first half of the 1930s play a crucial role in any interpretation of the relationship between the Tractatus and the Philosophical Investigations . G. E. Moore’s notes of Wittgenstein’s Cambridge lectures, 1930-1933, offer us a remarkably careful and conscientious record of what Wittgenstein said at the time, and are much more detailed and reliable than previously published notes from those lectures. The co-authors are currently editing these notes of Wittgenstein’s lectures for a book to (...)
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  25.  58
    The professionalism movement: Behaviors are the key to progress.Shiphra Ginsburg & David T. Stern - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (2):14 – 15.
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  26.  10
    The Uses of Wittgenstein's Beetle: Philosophical Investigations §293 and Its Interpreters.David G. Stern - 2007-08-24 - In Guy Kahane, Edward Kanterian & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), Wittgenstein and His Interpreters. Blackwell. pp. 248–268.
    This chapter contains section titled: Introduction: Baker on the Private Language Argument Strawson's and Malcolms Interpretations of the Beetle Story Pitcher's, Cook's, and Donagan's Interpretations of the Beetle Story Cohen's Repudiation of the Beetle Story Hacker's and Baker's Interpretations of the Beetle Story.
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  27.  55
    The uses of Wittgenstein's beetle: Philosophical investigations and its interpreters.David G. Stern - 2007 - In Guy Kahane, Edward Kanterian & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), Wittgenstein and His Interpreters: Essays in Memory of Gordon Baker. Blackwell. pp. 248--268.
  28.  48
    Essays on Hegel's Philosophy of Subjective Spirit: Imaginative Transformation and Ethical Action in Literature.David S. Stern (ed.) - 2013 - State University of New York Press.
    The first English-language collection devoted to Hegel’s Philosophy of Subjective Spirit.
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  29.  5
    Essays on Hegel's Philosophy of Subjective Spirit.David S. Stern (ed.) - 2013 - State University of New York Press.
    _The first English-language collection devoted to Hegel’s_ Philosophy of Subjective Spirit.
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  30. Was Wittgenstein a Jew?David G. Stern - 2001 - In James Klagge (ed.), Wittgenstein: Biography and Philosoph. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  31.  56
    Wittgenstein's Lectures on Ethics, Cambridge 1933.David G. Stern - 2013 - Wittgenstein-Studien 4 (1).
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  32.  13
    Parables in Midrash: Narrative and Exegesis in Rabbinic Literature.Edward A. Goldman & David Stern - 1993 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 113 (3):500.
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  33.  8
    Specificity within the EGF family/ErbB receptor family signaling network.David J. Riese & David F. Stern - 1998 - Bioessays 20 (1):41-48.
    Recent years have witnessed tremendous growth in the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family of peptide growth factors and the ErbB family of tyrosine kinases, the receptors for these factors. Accompanying this growth has been an increased appreciation for the roles these molecules play in tumorigenesis and in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation during development. Consequently, a significant question has been how diverse biological responses are specified by these hormones and receptors. Here we discuss several characteristics of hormone-receptor interactions and receptor (...)
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  34.  92
    Heraclitus’ and Wittgenstein’s River Images: Stepping Twice into the Same River.David G. Stern - 1991 - The Monist 74 (4):579-604.
    This paper examines a number of river images which have been attributed to Heraclitus, the ways they are used by Plato and Wittgenstein, and the connection between these uses of imagery and the metaphilosophical issues about the nature and limits of philosophy which they lead to. After indicating some of the connections between Heraclitus’, Plato’s and Wittgenstein’s use of river images, I give a preliminary reading of three crucial fragments from the Heraclitean corpus, associating each with a different river image. (...)
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  35.  29
    Tree-structured readings of the Tractatus.David G. Stern - 2023 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 11.
    I argue that the numbering system of the Tractatus lets us see how it was constructed, in two closely related senses of that term. First, it tells us a great deal about the genesis of the book, for the numbering system was used to assemble and rearrange a series of drafts, as recorded in MS 104. Second, it helps us understand the structure of the published book, as cryptically summarized in the opening footnote. I also discuss an unpublished letter from (...)
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  36.  8
    Wittgenstein: Lectures, Cambridge 1930–1933, From the Notes of G. E. Moore.David Stern, Brian Rogers & Gabriel Citron - 2016 - In Aidan Seery, Josef G. F. Rothhaupt & Lars Albinus (eds.), Wittgenstein’s Remarks on Frazer: The Text and the Matter. Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 85-98.
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  37.  54
    Wittgenstein versus Carnap on physicalism: a reassessment.David Stern - unknown
    The "standard account" of Wittgenstein’s relations with the Vienna Circle is that the early Wittgenstein was a principal source and inspiration for the Circle’s positivistic and scientific philosophy, while the later Wittgenstein was deeply opposed to the logical empiricist project of articulating a "scientific conception of the world." However, this telegraphic summary is at best only half-true and at worst deeply misleading. For it prevents us appreciating the fluidity and protean character of their philosophical dialogue. In retrospectively attributing clear-cut positions (...)
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  38.  14
    Foundationalism, Holism, or Hegel?David S. Stern - 1991 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 22 (1):21-32.
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  39.  45
    Midrash and Indeterminacy.David Stern - 1988 - Critical Inquiry 15 (1):132-161.
    Literary theory, newly conscious of its own historicism, has recently turned its attention to the history of interpretation. For midrash, this attention has arrived none too soon. The activity of Biblical interpretation as practiced by the sages of early Rabbinic Judaism in late antiquity, midrash has long been known to Western scholars, but mainly as either an exegetical curiosity or a source to be mined for facts about the Jewish background of early Christianity. The perspective of literary theory has placed (...)
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  40.  63
    The Immanence of Thought.David S. Stern - 1990 - The Owl of Minerva 22 (1):19-33.
    From Kierkegaard’s famous polemic against Hegel’s system, and Marx’s rejection of the “mysticism” of reason, to Heidegger’s claim that Hegel completes the tradition of western metaphysics, and contemporary critics’ identification of Hegel as the authoritative spokesman — the “Master” — for the principles of unity and identity, a standard view has governed interpretations and evaluations of Hegel’s philosophy. Though familiarity with the positions just cited reveals considerable disparity, one does not need an especially discerning eye to recognize the common features (...)
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  41. The Methods of the Tractatus: beyond positivism and metaphysics?David G. Stern - 2003 - In Paolo Parrini, Wes Salmon & Merrilee Salmon (eds.), Logical Empiricism: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. Pittsburgh University Pres.
     
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  42.  13
    Weininger and Wittgenstein on ‘animal psychology.’.David G. Stern - 2004 - In David G. Stern & Béla Szabados (eds.), Wittgenstein Reads Weininger. Cambridge University Press. pp. 169.
  43.  3
    Wittgenstein on Ethical Concepts: A Reading of Philosophical Investigations §77 and Moore’s Lecture Notes, May 1933.David G. Stern - 2013 - In Martin G. Weiss & Hajo Greif (eds.), Ethics, society, politics: proceedings of the 35th International Ludwig Wittgenstein Symposium, Kirchberg am Wechsel, Austria, 2012. Boston: De Gruyter Ontos. pp. 55-68.
  44.  33
    Des Remarques philosophiques aux Recherches philosophiques.David Stern - 2012 - Philosophiques 39 (1):9-34.
    La discussion sur le langage privé que l’on trouve dans les Recherchesphilosophiques a été écrite entre 1937 et 1945, après que les 190 premières remarques de la partie I du livre eurent presque atteint leur forme finale. Les textes post-1936 sur le langage privé constituent un nouveau départ, dans sa lettre et son esprit, par rapport au matériau d’avant 1936.Néanmoins, entre 1929 et 1936, Wittgenstein s’est penché à plusieurs reprises sur l’idée d’un langage « que moi seul peux comprendre ». (...)
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  45.  35
    The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum: an emerging genomic model system for ecological, developmental and evolutionary studies.Jennifer A. Brisson & David L. Stern - 2006 - Bioessays 28 (7):747-755.
    Aphids display an abundance of adaptations that are not easily studied in existing model systems. Here we review the biology of a new genomic model system, the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. We then discuss several phenomena that are particularly accessible to study in the pea aphid: the developmental genetic basis of polyphenisms, aphid–bacterial symbioses, the genetics of adaptation and mechanisms of virus transmission. The pea aphid can be maintained in the laboratory and natural populations can be studied in the field. (...)
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  46.  26
    Wittgenstein: Lectures, Cambridge 1930–1933, From the Notes of G. E. Moore: Lecture 3b, May 5, 1933 and Lecture 4a, May 9, 1933.David Stern, Brian Rogers & Gabriel Citron - 2016 - In Aidan Seery, Josef G. F. Rothhaupt & Lars Albinus (eds.), Wittgenstein’s Remarks on Frazer: The Text and the Matter. Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 85-98.
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  47. On Wittgenstein.James Conant, Wolfgang Kienzler, Stefan Majetschak, Volker Munz, Josef G. F. Rothhaupt, David Stern & Wilhelm Vossenkuhl - 2013 - In Sascha Bru, Wolfgang Huemer & Daniel Steuer (eds.), Wittgenstein Reading. Berlin & New York: De Gruyter. pp. 96-107.
     
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  48.  42
    A new exposition of the 'private language argument': Wittgenstein's 'Notes for the "Philosophical Lecture"'.David G. Stern - 1994 - Philosophical Investigations 17 (3):552-565.
  49. Brief Notices.Natalie B. Dohrmann & David Stern - 2009 - Speculum 84 (2):523.
  50.  75
    The "Dénouement" of "Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind".Keith Lehrer & David G. Stern - 2000 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 17 (2):201 - 216.
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