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  1.  24
    Science, Site and Speech: Scientific Knowledge and the Spaces of Rhetoric.David N. Livingstone - 2007 - History of the Human Sciences 20 (2):71-98.
    An awareness of the significance of location in the production and dissemination of scientific knowledge has brought a new dimension to recent work on the sociology of science. But the importance of speech in scientific enterprises has been less well developed. This article explores the idea of `spaces of speech' by underscoring the connections between location and locution. It develops a case study of how Darwinian evolution was talked about in different sites using examples from Ireland and the American South (...)
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  2.  4
    Darwinism and Calvinism: The Belfast-Princeton Connection.David N. Livingstone - 1992 - Isis 83 (3):408-428.
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  3. Risen Into Empire": Moral Geographies of the American Republic.David N. Livingstone - 2005 - In David N. Livingstone & Charles W. J. Withers (eds.), Geography and Revolution. University of Chicago Press. pp. 304--325.
     
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  4.  11
    Finding Revelation in Anthropology: Alexander Winchell, William Robertson Smith and the Heretical Imperative.David N. Livingstone - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Science 48 (3):435-454.
    Anthropological inquiry has often been considered an agent of intellectual secularization. Not least is this so in the sphere of religion, where anthropological accounts have often been taken to represent the triumph of naturalism. This metanarrative, however, fails to recognize that naturalistic explanations could sometimes be espousedforreligious purposes and in defence of confessional creeds. This essay examines two late nineteenth-century figures – Alexander Winchell in the United States and William Robertson Smith in Britain – who found in anthropological analysis resources (...)
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  5.  27
    Public Spectacle and Scientific Theory: William Robertson Smith and the Reading of Evolution in Victorian Scotland.David N. Livingstone - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (1):1-29.
    This paper examines the reaction of Victorian Presbyterian culture to the theory of evolution in late nineteenth century Scotland. Focusing on the role played by the Free Church theologian, biblical critic and anthropological theorist, William Robertson Smith, it argues that, compared with Smith’s radical scholarship, evolutionary theories did little to disturb the Scottish Calvinist mind-set. After surveying the attitudes to evolution among a range of theological leaders, the paper examines Smith’s fundamentally threatening proposals and the circumstances that led to the (...)
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  6.  30
    Human Acclimatization: Perspectives on a Contested Field of Inquiry in Science, Medicine and Geography.David N. Livingstone - 1987 - History of Science 25 (4):359-394.
  7. Re-Placing Darwinism and Christianity.David N. Livingstone - 2003 - In David C. Lindberg & Ronald L. Numbers (eds.), When Science and Christianity Meet. University of Chicago Press. pp. 193.
     
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  8.  34
    Geography and Revolution.David N. Livingstone & Charles W. J. Withers (eds.) - 2005 - University of Chicago Press.
    A term with myriad associations, revolution is commonly understood in its intellectual, historical, and sociopolitical contexts. Until now, almost no attention has been paid to revolution and questions of geography. Geography and Revolution examines the ways that place and space matter in a variety of revolutionary situations. David N. Livingstone and Charles W. J. Withers assemble a set of essays that are themselves revolutionary in uncovering not only the geography of revolutions but the role of geography in revolutions. Here, scientific (...)
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  9.  9
    Of Design and Dining Clubs: Geography in America and Britain, 1770–1860.David N. Livingstone - 1991 - History of Science 29 (84):153-183.
  10.  6
    The History of Cartography. Volume 2, Book 2: Cartography in the Traditional East and Southeast Asian Societies. J. B. Harley, David Woodward. [REVIEW]David N. Livingstone - 1995 - Isis 86 (4):625-626.
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  11.  6
    The Construction of Nature. A Discursive Strategy in Modern European Thought.David N. Livingstone - 1996 - History of European Ideas 22 (2):128-129.
  12.  8
    Public Spectacle and Scientific Theory: William Robertson Smith and the Reading of Evolution in Victorian Scotland.David N. Livingstone - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (1):1-29.
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  13.  11
    Science, Magic and Religion: A Contextual Reassessment of Geography in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries.David N. Livingstone - 1988 - History of Science 26 (73):269-294.
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  14.  2
    Creation, Evolution, and “The New Cosmic Philosophy”: William Todd Martin's Critique of Herbert Spencer.Andrew R. Holmes & David N. Livingstone - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (2):375-396.
    This article explores the religious response of one neglected writer to the evolutionary philosophy of Herbert Spencer. William Todd Martin was a minister of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland and in 1887 published The Evolution Hypothesis: A Criticism of the New Cosmic Philosophy. The work demonstrates the essentially contested nature of “evolution” and “creation” by showing how a self-confessed creationist could affirm an evolutionary understanding of the natural world and species transformation. Martin's approach reflected a transatlantic Presbyterian worldview that saw (...)
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  15.  12
    The History of Science and the History of Geography: Interactions and Implications.David N. Livingstone - 1984 - History of Science 22 (3):271-302.