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David Lefkowitz [35]David B. Lefkowitz [1]
  1. On a moral right to civil disobedience.David Lefkowitz - 2007 - Ethics 117 (2):202-233.
  2.  54
    In Defense of Penalizing (but not Punishing) Civil Disobedience.David Lefkowitz - 2018 - Res Publica 24 (3):273-289.
    While many contemporary political philosophers agree that citizens of a legitimate state enjoy a moral right to civil disobedience, they differ over both the grounds of that right and its content. This essay defends the view that the moral right to civil disobedience derives from a general right to political participation, and the characterization of that right as precluding the state from punishing, but not from penalizing, those who exercise it. The argument proceeds by way of rebuttals to criticisms of (...)
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  3.  12
    Philosophy and International Law: A Critical Introduction.David Lefkowitz - 2020 - Cambridge University Press.
    In Philosophy and International Law, David Lefkowitz examines core questions of legal and political philosophy through critical reflection on contemporary international law. Is international law really law? The answer depends on what makes law. Does the existence of law depend on coercive enforcement? Or institutions such as courts? Or fidelity to the requirements of the rule of law? Or conformity to moral standards? Answers to these questions are essential for determining the truth or falsity of international legal skepticism, and understanding (...)
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  4. The duty to obey the law.David Lefkowitz - 2006 - Philosophy Compass 1 (6):571–598.
    Under what conditions, if any, do those the law addresses have a moral duty or obligation to obey it simply because it is the law? In this essay, I identify five general approaches to carrying out this task, and offer a somewhat detailed discussion of one or two examples of each approach. The approaches studied are: relational‐role approaches that appeal to the fact that an agent occupies the role of member in the political community; attempts to ground the duty to (...)
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  5.  45
    Autonomy, residence, and return.David Lefkowitz - 2015 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 18 (5):529-546.
  6.  65
    Partiality and Weighing Harm to Non-Combatants.David Lefkowitz - 2009 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 6 (3):298-316.
    The author contests the claim made independently by F.M. Kamm and Thomas Hurka that combatants ought to assign greater weight to collateral harm done to their compatriot noncombatants then they assign to collateral harm done to enemy non-combatants. Two arguments by analogy offered in support of such partiality, one of which appeals to permissible self/other asymmetry in cases of harming the few to save the many, and the second of which appeals to parents' justifiable partiality to their children, are found (...)
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  7. On the concept of a morally relevant harm.David Lefkowitz - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (4):409-423.
    The author argues that only when the two harms are morally relevant to one another may an agent take into account the number of people he can save. He defends an orbital conception of morally relevant harm, according to which harms that fall within the of a given harm are relevant to it, while all other harms are not. The possibility of preventing a harm provides both a first-order reason to prevent that harm, and a second-order reason not to consider (...)
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  8.  40
    A Contractualist Defense of Democratic Authority.David Lefkowitz - 2005 - Ratio Juris 18 (3):346-364.
    This paper provides a defense of the following thesis: When there is reasonable disagreement over the design of morally necessary collective action schemes, it would not be reasonable to reject the authority of a democratic decision procedure to settle these disputes. My first argument is a straightforward application of contractualist reasoning, and mirrors T. M. Scanlon's defense of a principle of fairness for the distribution of benefits produced by a cooperative scheme. My second argument develops and defends the intuition that (...)
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  9.  26
    The Nature of Fairness and Political Obligation.David Lefkowitz - 2004 - Social Theory and Practice 30 (1):1-31.
  10.  70
    On the foundation of rights to political self-determination: Secession, nonintervention, and democratic governance.David Lefkowitz - 2008 - Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (4):492-511.
  11.  25
    International Law, Institutional Moral Reasoning, and Secession.David Lefkowitz - 2018 - Law and Philosophy 37 (4):385-413.
    This paper argues for the superiority of international law’s existing ban on unilateral secession over its reform to include either a primary or remedial right to secession. I begin by defending the claim that secession is an inherently institutional concept, and that therefore we ought to employ institutional moral reasoning to defend or criticize specific proposals regarding a right to secede. I then respond to the objection that at present we lack the empirical evidence necessary to sustain any specific conclusion (...)
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  12.  29
    What makes a social order primitive? In defense of Hart's take on international law.David Lefkowitz - 2017 - Legal Theory 23 (4):258-282.
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  13.  18
    Democracy, Legitimacy, and Global Governance.David Lefkowitz - unknown
  14.  63
    Debate: Legitimate authority, following orders, and wars of questionable justice.David Lefkowitz - 2009 - Journal of Political Philosophy 18 (2):218-227.
  15.  42
    Skeptical challenges to international law.Carmen E. Pavel & David Lefkowitz - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (8):e12511.
    International and domestic law offer a study in contrasts: States' legal obligations often depend on their consent to specific international legal norms, whereas domestic law applies to individuals with or without their consent; enforcement in international law is weak and, for many international treaties, non‐existent, whereas states spend considerable resources to create centralized coercive enforcement mechanisms; and international law is characterized by much less institutional differentiation and specialization of functions than domestic legal systems are. These differences have invited a number (...)
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  16. The Principle of Fairness and States’ Duty to Obey International Law.David Lefkowitz - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 24 (2):327-346.
    I employ the principle of fairness to argue that many existing states have a moral duty to obey international law simply in virtue of its status as law. On this voluntarist interpretation of the principle of fairness, agents must accept the benefits of a cooperative scheme in order to acquire an obligation to contribute to that scheme’s operation. I contend that states can accept the benefits international law provides, and that only if they do so do states have a fair-play (...)
     
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  17.  72
    Legitimate political authority and the duty of those subject to it: A critique of Edmundson.David Lefkowitz - 2004 - Law and Philosophy 23 (4):399-435.
    According to William Edmundson, a legitimatepolitical authority is one that claims tocreate in its subjects a general duty ofobedience to the law, and that succeeds increating in its subjects a duty to obey stateofficials when they apply the law in particularcases. His argument that legitimate politicalauthority does not require the state''s claim tobe true rests on his analysis of legitimatetheoretical authority, and the assumption thattheoretical and practical authority are thesame in the relevant respects, both of whichare challenged here. In addition, (...)
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  18.  14
    Political Feasibility and a Global Climate Treaty.David Lefkowitz - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment.
    I contend that to be politically feasible a global climate treaty must satisfy the International Paretian principle (IP). I begin by defending IP as a principle of instrumental rationality that reflects the fact of extremely limited altruism vis-à-vis foreigners. I then address two objections to my thesis. One holds that an IP treaty is either economically infeasible or, contrary to its proponents’ claim, does not require side payments from poor states to rich ones. The other holds poor states will reject (...)
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  19.  6
    Facing authority: a theory of political legitimacy.David Lefkowitz - forthcoming - Contemporary Political Theory:1-4.
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  20. Collateral damage.David Lefkowitz - 2008 - In Larry May (ed.), War: Essays in Political Philosophy. New York: Cambridge University Press.
     
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  21.  54
    Should the Law Convict Those Who Act from Conviction? Reflections on a Demands-of-Conscience Criminal Defense.David Lefkowitz - 2016 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (4):657-675.
    How should the judge or jury in a just criminal court treat a civil disobedient, someone who performs a conscientiously motivated communicative breach of the criminal law? Kimberley Brownlee contends that all else equal a court of law should neither convict nor punish such offenders. Though I agree with this conclusion, I contend that Brownlee mischaracterizes the nature of the criminal defense to which civil disobedients are entitled. Whereas Brownlee maintains that such actors ought to be excused for their criminal (...)
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  22.  8
    Giving Up On Moral Truth Shall Set You Free: Walzer on Relativism, Criticism, and Toleration.David Lefkowitz - 2015 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 274 (4):385-398.
    Michael Walzer affirme que la morale est plurielle, subjective et concrète : une multitude de modes de vie morale qui sont créés par les membres des communautés historiquement situées. Cette thèse implique l’abandon d’une notion généralement acceptée de vérité morale ; d’après laquelle, au moins quelques revendications du type « il est immoral que ϕ » sont vraies en vertu du fait qu’elles constituent des applications de principes moraux universels et objectifs auxquels tout agent moral, en tant que quel, est (...)
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  23. A Moral Contractualist Defense of Political Obligation.David B. Lefkowitz - 2003 - Dissertation, University of Maryland, College Park
    Do citizens of any modern state have a general duty to acknowledge its authority to determine for them, for action guiding purposes, whether certain kinds of conduct are morally permissible, required, or forbidden? That is, is there a duty to obey the law? Moral Contractualism, I contend, entails that citizens of a liberal democratic state have such a duty. ;Treating others morally often requires agents to act collectively, but even agents who accept the moral necessity of collective action will sometimes (...)
     
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  24.  27
    Blame and the Criminal Law.David Lefkowitz - 2015 - Jurisprudence 6 (3):451-469.
    Many retributivists appear to presume that the concept of blame that figures in their accounts of just punishment is the same one people employ in their interpersonal moral relationships. David Shoemaker contends that this presumption is mistaken. Moral blameworthiness, he maintains, tracks only the meaning of a person's action––his reasons for acting as he did––while criminal blameworthiness, which he equates with liability to punishment, tracks only the impermissibility of an agent's action. I contest the second of these two claims, and (...)
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  25.  12
    Customary Law and the Case for Incorporationism.David Lefkowitz - 2005 - Legal Theory 11 (4):405-420.
  26.  2
    Civil Liability for Civil Disobedience.David Lefkowitz - 2023 - Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 31 (1):93-106.
    Sollte der freiheitlich-demokratische Staat zivil Ungehorsame für Schäden haftbar machen, die durch ihren Protest verursacht werden? Wenn nicht, warum nicht und wer sollte stattdessen die Kosten tragen? In diesem Aufsatz vertrete ich die Auffassung, dass zivil Ungehorsame für die von ihnen verursachten Schäden zivilrechtlich nicht haftbar gemacht werden sollten, solange ihr Protest die Form eines angemessen begrenzten zivilen Ungehorsams wahrt, der in der freiheitlichen Demokratie toleriert werden sollte. Statt der Ungehorsamen sollte die politische Gemeinschaft diese Kosten übernehmen, als einen Teil (...)
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  27. Global legal pluralism and the rule of law.David Lefkowitz - 2020 - In Paul Schiff Berman (ed.), The Oxford handbook of global legal pluralism. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
     
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  28.  22
    On Moral Arguments against a Legal Right to Unilateral Humanitarian Intervention.David Lefkowitz - 2006 - Public Affairs Quarterly 20 (2):115-134.
  29. solving The Chronological Paradox In Customary International Law: A Hartian Approach.David Lefkowitz - 2008 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 21 (1):128-148.
    As traditionally conceived, the creation of a new rule of customary international law requires that states believe the law to already require the conduct specified in the rule. Distinguishing the process whereby a customary rule comes to exist from the process whereby that customary rule becomes law dissolves this chronological paradox. Creation of a customary rule requires only that states come to believe that there exists a normative standard to which they ought to adhere, not that this standard is law. (...)
     
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  30. The Sources of International Law: Some Philosophical Reflections.David Lefkowitz - 2010 - In Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.), The philosophy of international law. New York: Oxford University Press.
     
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  31. What makes law? Dworkin, Fish, and Koskenniemi on the rule of law.David Lefkowitz - 2023 - In Thomas da Rosa de Bustamante & Margaret Martin (eds.), New essays on the Fish-Dworkin debate. New York: Hart Publishing, An Imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing.
     
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  32. 10. Evan Selinger and Robert Crease, eds., The Philosophy of Expertise Evan Selinger and Robert Crease, eds., The Philosophy of Expertise (pp. 377-381). [REVIEW]Philip Pettit, David Lefkowitz, Steven Wall, Mark Schroeder, Paula Casal & Rosalind Hursthouse - 2006 - In Laurie Dimauro (ed.), Ethics. Greenhaven Press.
     
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  33.  23
    Stilz, Anna . Liberal Loyalty: Freedom, Obligation, and the State . Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009. Pp. 264. $29.95 (cloth). [REVIEW]David Lefkowitz - 2010 - Ethics 120 (4):874-878.
  34.  77
    Review of Margaret Gilbert, A Theory of Political Obligation: Membership, Commitment, and the Bonds of Society[REVIEW]David Lefkowitz - 2007 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (6).
  35.  57
    Review of Thomas Christiano, The Constitution of Equality: Democratic Authority and its Limits[REVIEW]David Lefkowitz - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (5).
  36.  21
    Ratner, Steven R. The Thin Justice of International Law: A Moral Reckoning of the Law of Nations.New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. 496. $85.00. [REVIEW]David Lefkowitz - 2016 - Ethics 127 (1):310-314.
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