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  1.  29
    The Effects of Beliefs Versus Risk Attitude on Bargaining Outcomes.David L. Dickinson - 2009 - Theory and Decision 66 (1):69-101.
    In bargaining environments with uncertain disagreement or “impasse” outcomes (e.g., litigation or labor strike outcomes), there is an identification problem that confounds data interpretation. Specifically, the minimally acceptable settlement value from a risk-averse (risk-loving) but unbiased-belief bargainer is empirically indistinguishable from what one could get with risk-neutrality and pessimistically (optimistically) biased beliefs. This article reports results from a controlled bargaining experiment where data on both risk attitude and beliefs under uncertainty are generated in order to assess their relative importance in (...)
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  2. Ultimatum decision-making: A test of reciprocal kindness.David L. Dickinson - 2000 - Theory and Decision 48 (2):151-177.
    While fairness is often mentioned as a determinant of ultimatum bargaining behavior, few data sets are available that can test theories that incorporate fairness considerations. This paper tests the reciprocal kindness theory in Rabin (1993 Incorporating fairness into game theory and economics, The American Economic Review 83: 1281-1302) as an application to the one-period ultimatum bargaining game. We report on data from 100 ultimatum games that vary the financial stakes of the game from 1 to 15. Responder behavior is strongly (...)
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  3.  28
    Thinking about complex decisions: How sleep and time-of-day influence complex choices.Todd McElroy & David L. Dickinson - 2019 - Consciousness and Cognition 76 (C):102824.
  4.  60
    Nonbinding recommendations: the relative effects of focal points versus uncertainty reduction on bargaining outcomes. [REVIEW]David L. Dickinson & Lynn Hunnicutt - 2010 - Theory and Decision 69 (4):615-634.
    This article focuses on the effects of nonbinding recommendations on bargaining outcomes. Recommendations are theorized to have two effects: they can create a focal point for final bargaining positions, and they can decrease outcome uncertainty should dispute persist. While the focal point effect may lower dispute rates, the uncertainty reduction effect is predicted to do the opposite for risk-averse bargainers. Which of these effects dominates is of critical importance in the design of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) procedures, which are increasingly (...)
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