78 found
Order:
Disambiguations
David Koepsell [72]David R. Koepsell [6]David Richard Koepsell [4]
  1.  52
    On genies and bottles: Scientists' moral responsibility and dangerous technology r&d.David Koepsell - 2010 - Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (1):119-133.
    The age-old maxim of scientists whose work has resulted in deadly or dangerous technologies is: scientists are not to blame, but rather technologists and politicians must be morally culpable for the uses of science. As new technologies threaten not just populations but species and biospheres, scientists should reassess their moral culpability when researching fields whose impact may be catastrophic. Looking at real-world examples such as smallpox research and the Australian “mousepox trick”, and considering fictional or future technologies like Kurt Vonnegut’s (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  2.  21
    Scientific integrity and research ethics: An approach from the ethos of science.David Koepsell - 2016 - Amsterdam, NL: Springer.
    This book is an easy to read, yet comprehensive introduction to practical issues in research ethics and scientific integrity. It addresses questions about what constitutes appropriate academic and scientific behaviors from the point of view of what Robert Merton called the “ethos of science.” In other words, without getting into tricky questions about the nature of the good or right (as philosophers often do), Koepsell’s concise book provides an approach to behaving according to the norms of science and academia without (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3. Beyond Paper.David Koepsell & Barry Smith - 2014 - The Monist 97 (2):222–235.
    The authors outline the way in which documents as social objects have evolved from their earliest forms to the electronic documents of the present day. They note that while certain features have remained consistent, processes regarding document authentication are seriously complicated by the easy reproducibility of digital entities. The authors argue that electronic documents also raise significant questions concerning the theory of ‘documentality’ advanced by Maurizio Ferraris, especially given the fact that interactive documents seem to blur the distinctions between the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4.  16
    Who Owns You?: The Corporate Gold Rush to Patent Your Genes.David Koepsell - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    You quite rightly need not fear being owned in the most traditional and reprehensible sense by which humans ... New and more subtle forms of ownership have emerged in the past hundred years that now impact on essential qualities and ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5.  4
    The Science.David Koepsell - 2015-03-19 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), Who Owns You? Wiley. pp. 49–65.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Classical Genetics Modern Genetics How Genes Work DNA Function in Metabolism Differentiation Information, Structure and Function: Individuals and “Persons” Information and Individuals Personhood and “Me‐ness”.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  25
    John Searle's Ideas About Social Reality: Extensions, Criticisms, and Reconstructions.David Koepsell & Laurence S. Moss - 2003 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    John R. Searle’s 1995 publication The Construction of Social Reality is the foundation of this collection of scholarly papers examining Searle's philosophical theories. Searle’s book sets out to reconstruct the ontology of the social sciences through an analysis of linguistic practices in the context of his celebrated work on intentionality. His book provided a stimulating account of institutional facts such as money and marriage and how they are created and replicated in everyday social life. The authors in this collection provide (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  7.  51
    Back to Basics: How Technology and the Open Source Movement Can Save Science.David Koepsell - 2010 - Social Epistemology 24 (3):181-190.
    The recent debate arising from leaked emails from a UK-based research group working on the issue of climate change is another in a long string of historical lapses that periodically threatens public confidence in the institutions and methods of science. As with other similar events, it did not have to happen. What should concern us is that the accepted methods and practices of science have once again to be shown to be too easily set aside, ignored, or broken due to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8. Social Reality, Law, and Justice.David Koepsell - 2016 - In Leonardo Zaibert (ed.), The Theory and Practice of Ontology. London, UK: pp. 79-94.
    Reality is composed of many layers, including what John Searle calls “brute facts” and, superimposed on these, what he calls “social reality”. Ontology is the study of reality in its various layers, and involves attempts to describe that reality in ways that are useful and logically consistent. Philosophers and others who attempt to “build” ontologies, must examine the manners in which we can best describe objects, and devise structured vocabularies that can be used consistently, often across disciplines, and now with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  27
    Science and ethics: can science help us make wise moral judgments?Paul Kurtz & David Richard Koepsell (eds.) - 2007 - Amherst, N.Y.: Prometheus Books.
    This volume presents a unique collection of authors who generally maintain that science can help us make wise choices and that an increase in scientific knowledge can help modify our ethical values and bring new ethical principles into social awareness.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10. Letter to the Editor: Dealing with socially constructed concepts in an ontology.David Koepsell & Barry Smith - 2009 - Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics 4 (2):75-76.
    Response to the paper “The Biomedical Ethics Ontology Proposal: Excellent Aims, Questionable Methods" by James DuBois, published in the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Creating a Controlled Vocabulary for the Ethics of Human Research: Towards a biomedical ethics ontology.David Koepsell, Robert Arp, Jennifer Fostel & Barry Smith - 2009 - Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics 4 (1):43-58.
    Ontologies describe reality in specific domains in ways that can bridge various disciplines and languages. They allow easier access and integration of information that is collected by different groups. Ontologies are currently used in the biomedical sciences, geography, and law. A Biomedical Ethics Ontology would benefit members of ethics committees who deal with protocols and consent forms spanning numerous fields of inquiry. There already exists the Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI); the proposed BMEO would interoperate with OBI, creating a powerful (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Human Participants in Engineering Research: Notes from a Fledgling Ethics Committee.David Koepsell, Willem-Paul Brinkman & Sylvia Pont - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (4):1033-1048.
    For the past half-century, issues relating to the ethical conduct of human research have focused largely on the domain of medical, and more recently social–psychological research. The modern regime of applied ethics, emerging as it has from the Nuremberg trials and certain other historical antecedents, applies the key principles of: autonomy, respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice to human beings who enter trials of experimental drugs and devices :168–175, 2001). Institutions such as Institutional Review Boards and Ethics Committees oversee (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  91
    An emerging ontology of jurisdiction in cyberspace.David R. Koepsell - 2000 - Ethics and Information Technology 2 (2):99-104.
    The emergence of the new information economy hascomplicated jurisdictional issues in commerce andcrime. Many of these difficulties are simplyextensions of problems that arose due to other media.Telephones and fax machines had already complicatedjurists'' determinations of applicable laws. Evenbefore the Internet, contracts were often negotiatedwithout any face-to-face contact – entirely bytelephone and fax. Where is such a contractnegotiated? The answer to this question is critical toany litigation that may arise over such contracts. Thelaws of contract are often quite different from onejurisdiction (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14. Human Research Ethics Committees in Technical Universities.David Koepsell, Willem-Paul Brinkman & Sylvia Pont - 2014 - Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics 9 (3):67-73.
    Human research ethics has developed in both theory and practice mostly from experiences in medical research. Human participants, however, are used in a much broader range of research than ethics committees oversee, including both basic and applied research at technical universities. Although mandated in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia, non-medical research involving humans need not receive ethics review in much of Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Our survey of the top 50 technical universities in the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  36
    Breaking Bad as Philosophy.David Koepsell - 2022 - In David Kyle Johnson (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook of Popular Culture as Philosophy. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 1-21.
    Breaking Bad has been lauded as the best series ever on television by numerous critics and polls. It follows the “Breaking Bad” (i.e., the moral degradation) of Walter White, a middle-class, middle-aged high school chemistry teacher in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Presented in the form of a literary epic employing satire, it provides us with a way to look at complex issues of justice, the good, and meaning, all while imparting a sense of aesthetics of justice and morality. The aesthetics of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Applied Ontology: A Marvin Farber Conference on Law and Institutions in Society.Barry Smith & David R. Koepsell (eds.) - 1998 - Buffalo: University at Buffalo.
    The application of ontology has thus far [in 1998] been confined almost exclusively to the field of knowledge representation. Ontology has been applied, for example, in the design of medical databases and in the construction of geographical information systems. One area which is naturally suited to ontological analysis is that of the law and of social institutions in general. -/- Legal systems are composed of legal entities, such as laws, contracts, obligations, and rights. Their application yields new categories of entities (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Peter Hare and the problem of evil.David Koepsell - 2010 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (1):53-59.
    Peter Hare and Edward Madden's collaborative book Evil and the Concept of God (968) has become a staple in literature about the problem of evil and remains frequently cited by supporters and critics alike. The major concepts of the work arose out of earlier papers in which they first began to formulate their arguments about the problem of evil. Their article "Evil and Unlimited Power" embodies many of their arguments against quasi-theist attempts to resolve the problem of evil.1 Assembled from (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  10
    DNA, Species, Individuals, and Persons.David Koepsell - 2015-03-19 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), Who Owns You? Wiley. pp. 66–82.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Individuals and Species Commonalities among Species Individuals within Species Individual Histories and Individual Genomes The Social and Legal Importance of Individuality Human Individuals, Persons, and Rights Implications for Justice.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  17
    Ownership of Information Technology.David Koepsell - 2022 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), Ethics in the AI, Technology, and Information Age. London, UK: pp. 103-115.
    Modern information technologies rely on electronic and optical signals transmitting data, expressions, and other signals around the world. Digital networks account for trillions of dollars worth of worldwide commerce, but the nature of their objects is complicated and has proven to be a challenge for customary and legal modes of ownership for expressions. Intellectual property law governed expressions and inventions for the past couple hundred years, but software and other digital objects, due to their ephemeral and non-physical natures, pose some (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  17
    Philosophy and Breaking Bad.Kevin S. Decker, David R. Koepsell & Robert Arp (eds.) - 2016 - Cham: Palgrave Macmillan.
    This volume considers the numerous philosophical ideas and arguments found in and inspired by the critically acclaimed series Breaking Bad. This show garnered both critical and popular attention for its portrayal of a cancer-stricken, middle-aged, middle-class, high school chemistry teacher’s drift into the dark world of selling methamphetamine to support his family. Its characters, situations, and aesthetic raise serious and familiar philosophical issues, especially related to ethics and morality. The show provokes a bevy of rich questions and discussion points, such (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  47
    Authorship and Artefacts.David Koepsell - 2010 - The Monist 93 (3):481-492.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  5
    Are Genes Intellectual Property?David Koepsell - 2015-03-19 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), Who Owns You? Wiley. pp. 101–118.
    US law has until recently treated unmodified and merely “isolated” genes as a form of intellectual property. Patents protect processes, methods, manufactures, and compositions of matter. Legal theorists and intellectual property scholars have similarly weighed in on the patentability of genes, often uncritical of the strained lines of reasoning that made first “isolated and purified” products of nature patentable, or simply weighing the costs vs. benefits. In the early fifteenth century, the first robust institutionalized forms of intellectual property protection emerged (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  4
    Are Genes Intellectual Property?David Koepsell - 2015-03-19 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), Who Owns You? Wiley. pp. 101–118.
    This chapter contains sections titled: The Historical Development of Intellectual Property The Theory of Intellectual Property Problem Areas in Intellectual Property Theory and Practice Do Genes Fit any Current Notion of Intellectual Property? What CAN Properly be Patented? Genes and the Law: Where Do They Fit?
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. A Regular Guy.David Koepsell - 2007 - Free Inquiry 27:18-18.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Against Solipsism.David Koepsell - 2007 - Free Inquiry 27:16-17.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. A Time For Courage.David Koepsell - 2006 - Free Inquiry 26:14-15.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Blockchains and Genomics: Promises and Limits of Technology.David Koepsell & Mirelle Vanessa Gonzalez - 2022 - Blockchain in Life Sciences.
    One of the early, non-financial uses of blockchain technologies around which several startups have developed was to help manage, monetize, and make the sharing of genomic data more private. Because deidentified genomic data are excluded from HIPAA and many other regulatory contexts worldwide—and is already a widely traded commodity for science valued in the hundreds of millions over the past decade—genomic blockchains proved a promising entry point for using the benefits of blockchains for dissemination and remuneration of data. Several models (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  4
    BRCA1 and 2.David Koepsell - 2015-03-19 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), Who Owns You? Wiley. pp. 88–100.
    From the late 1980s, scientists began concentrating their search for genes presumed responsible for inherited tendencies to get ovarian and breast cancers on chromosome 17. The Berkeley group and others around the world were closing in on the sequence when Mark Skolnick, a founder of Myriad Genetics, announced successfully isolating and cloning the BRCA1 mutation. In 1994, Myriad and other cooperating parties first filed a patent for the BRCA1 mutation they isolated and then in 1995 they also filed patents for (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  50
    Breaking bad and philosophy.David Richard Koepsell & Robert Arp (eds.) - 2012 - Chicago: Open Court.
    Breaking Bad, hailed by Stephen King, Chuck Klosterman, and many others as the best of all TV dramas, tells the story of a man whose life changes because of the medical death sentence of an advanced cancer diagnosis. The show depicts his metamorphosis from inoffensive chemistry teacher to feared drug lord and remorseless killer. Driven at first by the desire to save his family from destitution, he risks losing his family altogether because of his new life of crime. In defiance (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Beyond Human: Smart Contracts, Smart-Machines, and Documentality.David Koepsell - 2022 - In Jason Grant Allen & Peter Hunn (eds.), Smart Legal Contracts: Computable Law in Theory and Practice. Oxford, UK: pp. 327-337.
    The theory of documentality is a way of describing social reality. Developed by Italian philosopher Maurizio Ferraris, it says that the world of social objects is a world of documents, fundamentally. Specifically, it attempts to fill in gaps regarding the existence of objects whose dependence precedes traditional, written documents. Borrowing from Derrida, Ferraris concludes that no part of social reality exists outside of texts, while expanding the notion of texts to include inscriptions as memories in minds. Social reality is constructed (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Bringing Something to the Table.David Koepsell - 2007 - Free Inquiry 27:16-17.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  14
    Copyright Genes, Embryos.David Koepsell - 2014 - In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary debates in bioethics. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 25--152.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Cfi Goes To China.David Koepsell - 2005 - Free Inquiry 25.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Carl Menger and exact theory in the social sciences.David R. Koepsell - 2007 - In Paul Kurtz & David R. Koepsell (eds.), Science and Ethics: Can Science Help Us Make Wise Moral Judgments? Prometheus Books. pp. 332.
  35.  7
    DNA and The Commons.David Koepsell - 2015-03-19 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), Who Owns You? Wiley. pp. 119–136.
    For nearly two decades, nonengineered human DNA was patented without challenge. The US Supreme Court recently agreed that many of those patents do not fit accurately into any currently accepted scheme of intellectual property protection. One should consider: whether DNA fits into other forms of property protection (land, moveables, chattels, etc.); whether DNA warrants a new and unique form of property protection, or whether DNA belongs to the class of objects generally considered to be as “the commons.” Current schemes of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  6
    DNA and The Commons.David Koepsell - 2015-03-19 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), Who Owns You? Wiley. pp. 119–136.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Current Schemes of Intellectual Property Protection Existing Forms of Property Protection Brute Facts and Genes Unique Property Protection for DNA? The Notion of the Commons The Commons as a Choice The Commons by Necessity DNA as a Commons Is DNA More like Ideas or Radio Spectra?
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Designer Moods: The Ethics of Neurochemical Enhancement.David Koepsell - 2009 - Free Inquiry 29:26-27.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  5
    DNA, Species, Individuals, and Persons.David Koepsell - 2015-03-19 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), Who Owns You? Wiley. pp. 52–68.
    The sciences of genetics and genomics are revealing more all the time regarding our statuses as individuals relative to our particular genomes. Geographical isolation is presumably the greatest factor in allowing for populations of a species to change genetically over time, in response to environmental pressures and genetic drift accelerated by the mechanism of sexual reproduction. In order to develop a robust account of what rights individual members of the human species might have to either their own particular DNA or (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  7
    Ethics and Ontology.David Koepsell - 2015-03-19 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), Who Owns You? Wiley. pp. 21–29.
    Gene patenting was enabled by strained interpretations of legal precedent and with very little consideration of its ultimate ethical implications. The sciences of justice, ethics, and morals remain in their dark ages, with their practitioners all ascribing to differing values and modes of inquiry, besieged in their various camps of deontological, or consequentialist, or emotive or theistic dogmas. Ownership and property rights in moveables are good candidates for grounded relations as opposed to intellectual property. The groundedness of a valid possession (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Gaius Baltar and the Transhuman Temptation.David Koepsell - 2008 - In Jason T. Eberl (ed.), Battlestar Galactica and Philosophy: Knowledge Here Begins Out There. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 241--252.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  4
    Gaius Baltar and the Transhuman Temptation.David Koepsell - 2007-11-16 - In Jason T. Eberl (ed.), Battlestar Galactica and Philosophy. Blackwell. pp. 241–252.
    This chapter contains section titled: The Fall of Baltar The Transhuman Temptation… Really! The First and Last Temptations of Baltar “There Must Be Some Way Out of Here” Notes.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Great Minds: John Stuart Mill.David Koepsell - 2005 - Free Inquiry 26:47-48.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Humanism and Civil Rights.David Koepsell - 2007 - Free Inquiry 27:13-14.
  44. Humanist 'Leadership' and Me.David Koepsell - 2010 - Free Inquiry 30:34-36.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Individual and Collective Rights in Genomic Data: Preliminary Questions.David Koepsell - 2007 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 16 (1):151.
  46.  4
    Individual and Collective Rights in Genomic Data.David Koepsell - 2015-03-19 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), Who Owns You? Wiley. pp. 1–20.
    Life on earth is bound together by a common heritage, centered around a molecule that is present in almost every living cell of every living creature. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), composed of four base pairs, the nucleic acids thymine, adenine, cytosine, and guanine, encodes the data that directs, in conjunction with the environment, the development and metabolism of all nondependent living creatures. Except for some viruses that rely only on ribonucleic acid (RNA), all living things are built by the interaction of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  9
    Individual and Collective Rights in Genomic Data.David Koepsell - 2015-03-19 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), Who Owns You? Wiley. pp. 20–39.
    This chapter contains sections titled: The Current Conundrum The Objects of Our Study The Legal Framework So Far Special Challenges of DNA Property and Parts Autonomy, Individuality, and Personhood Economics and the Marketplace for Genes Ethics and Method An Outline for the Investigation The Challenge Ahead.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Innovation and Nanotechnology: Converging Technologies and the End of Intellectual Property.David Koepsell - 2011 - London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic.
    This book defines 'nanowares' as the ideas and products arising out of nanotechnology. Koepsell argues that these rapidly developing new technologies demand a new approach to scientific discovery and innovation in our society. He takes established ideas from social philosophy and applies them to the nanoparticle world. In doing so he breaks down the subject into its elemental form and from there we are better able to understand how these elements fit into the construction of a more complex system of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  4
    Introduction.David Koepsell - 2015-03-19 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), Who Owns You? Wiley. pp. 1–19.
    This chapter contains sections titled: You and Your Genes Your Patented Parts The “I, Robot, Your Robot” Scenario The Elephant Man Scenario There's Gold in Them Thar Genes! Bio‐Prospecting and Social Justice Discovery, not Invention Genetic Diversity and Cultural Commons Are You Your Genes? Genes, Information, and Privacy Practical Considerations: Gene Patents and Innovation The Road Ahead.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Is there a God? Go Ask Alice.David Koepsell - 2006 - Free Inquiry 26:14-14.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 78