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  1.  24
    Nurses’ moral experiences of assisted death: A meta-synthesis of qualitative research.James Elmore, David Kenneth Wright & Maude Paradis - 2018 - Nursing Ethics 25 (8):955-972.
    Background: Legislative changes are resulting in assisted death as an option for people at the end of life. Although nurses’ experiences and perspectives are underrepresented within broader ethical discourses about assisted death, there is a small but significant body of literature examining nurses’ experiences of caring for people who request this option. Aim: To synthesize what has been learned about nurses’ experiences of caring for patients who request assisted death and to highlight what is morally at stake for nurses who (...)
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  2.  91
    Moral identity and palliative sedation: A systematic review of normative nursing literature.David Kenneth Wright, Chris Gastmans, Amanda Vandyk & Bernadette Dierckx de Casterlé - 2020 - Nursing Ethics 27 (3):868-886.
    Background: In the last two decades, nursing authors have published ethical analyses of palliative sedation—an end-of-life care practice that also receives significant attention in the broader medical and bioethics literature. This nursing literature is important, because it contributes to disciplinary understandings about nursing values and responsibilities in end-of-life care. Research aim: The purpose of this project is to review existing nursing ethics literature about palliative sedation, and to analyze how nurses’ moral identities are portrayed within this literature. Research design: We (...)
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  3.  44
    Of dilemmas and tensions: a qualitative study of palliative care physicians’ positions regarding voluntary active euthanasia in Quebec, Canada.Emmanuelle Bélanger, Anna Towers, David Kenneth Wright, Yuexi Chen, Golda Tradounsky & Mary Ellen Macdonald - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (1):48-53.
    ObjectivesIn 2015, the Province of Quebec, Canada passed a law that allowed voluntary active euthanasia. Palliative care stakeholders in Canada have been largely opposed to euthanasia, yet there is little research about their views. The research question guiding this study was the following: How do palliative care physicians in Quebec position themselves regarding the practice of VAE in the context of the new provincial legislation?MethodsWe used interpretive description, an inductive methodology to answer research questions about clinical practice. A total of (...)
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  4. “We are not the person we will be when these things happen:” Reflections on personhood from an ethnography of neuropalliative care.Marianne Sofronas, Franco A. Carnevale, Mary Ellen Macdonald, Vasiliki Bitzas & David Kenneth Wright - forthcoming - Nursing Inquiry.
    Neuropalliative care developed to address the needs of patients living with life‐limiting neurologic disease. One critical consideration is that disease‐related changes to cognition, communication, and function challenge illness experiences and care practices. We conducted an ethnography to understand neuropalliative care as a phenomenon; how it was experienced, provided, conceptualized. Personhood served as our conceptual framework; with its long philosophical history and important place in nursing theory, we examined the extent to which it captured neuropalliative experiences and concerns. Personhood contextualized complex (...)
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  5.  20
    Relational ethics of delirium care: Findings from a hospice ethnography.David Kenneth Wright, Susan Brajtman & Mary Ellen Macdonald - 2018 - Nursing Inquiry 25 (3):e12234.
    Delirium, a common syndrome in terminally ill people, presents specific challenges to a good death in end‐of‐life care. This paper examines the relational engagement between hospice nurses and their patients in a context of end‐of‐life delirium. Ethnographic fieldwork spanning 15 months was conducted at a freestanding residential hospice in eastern Canada. A shared value system was apparent within the nursing community of hospice; patients’ comfort and dignity were deemed most at stake and therefore commanded nurses’ primary attention. This overarching commitment (...)
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