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David J. Gunkel [31]David Joseph Gunkel [1]
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David Gunkel
Northern Illinois University
  1. The Machine Question: Critical Perspectives on Ai, Robots, and Ethics.David J. Gunkel - 2012 - MIT Press.
    One of the enduring concerns of moral philosophy is deciding who or what is deserving of ethical consideration. Much recent attention has been devoted to the "animal question" -- consideration of the moral status of nonhuman animals. In this book, David Gunkel takes up the "machine question": whether and to what extent intelligent and autonomous machines of our own making can be considered to have legitimate moral responsibilities and any legitimate claim to moral consideration. The machine question poses a fundamental (...)
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  2. Mind the gap: responsible robotics and the problem of responsibility.David J. Gunkel - 2020 - Ethics and Information Technology 22 (4):307-320.
    The task of this essay is to respond to the question concerning robots and responsibility—to answer for the way that we understand, debate, and decide who or what is able to answer for decisions and actions undertaken by increasingly interactive, autonomous, and sociable mechanisms. The analysis proceeds through three steps or movements. It begins by critically examining the instrumental theory of technology, which determines the way one typically deals with and responds to the question of responsibility when it involves technology. (...)
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  3. The other question: can and should robots have rights?David J. Gunkel - 2018 - Ethics and Information Technology 20 (2):87-99.
    This essay addresses the other side of the robot ethics debate, taking up and investigating the question “Can and should robots have rights?” The examination of this subject proceeds by way of three steps or movements. We begin by looking at and analyzing the form of the question itself. There is an important philosophical difference between the two modal verbs that organize the inquiry—can and should. This difference has considerable history behind it that influences what is asked about and how. (...)
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  4. ChatGPT: deconstructing the debate and moving it forward.Mark Coeckelbergh & David J. Gunkel - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-11.
    Large language models such as ChatGPT enable users to automatically produce text but also raise ethical concerns, for example about authorship and deception. This paper analyses and discusses some key philosophical assumptions in these debates, in particular assumptions about authorship and language and—our focus—the use of the appearance/reality distinction. We show that there are alternative views of what goes on with ChatGPT that do not rely on this distinction. For this purpose, we deploy the two phased approach of deconstruction and (...)
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  5. Debate: What is Personhood in the Age of AI?David J. Gunkel & Jordan Joseph Wales - 2021 - AI and Society 36:473–486.
    In a friendly interdisciplinary debate, we interrogate from several vantage points the question of “personhood” in light of contemporary and near-future forms of social AI. David J. Gunkel approaches the matter from a philosophical and legal standpoint, while Jordan Wales offers reflections theological and psychological. Attending to metaphysical, moral, social, and legal understandings of personhood, we ask about the position of apparently personal artificial intelligences in our society and individual lives. Re-examining the “person” and questioning prominent construals of that category, (...)
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  6. A Vindication of the Rights of Machines.David J. Gunkel - 2014 - Philosophy and Technology 27 (1):113-132.
    This essay responds to the machine question in the affirmative, arguing that artifacts, like robots, AI, and other autonomous systems, can no longer be legitimately excluded from moral consideration. The demonstration of this thesis proceeds in four parts or movements. The first and second parts approach the subject by investigating the two constitutive components of the ethical relationship—moral agency and patiency. In the process, they each demonstrate failure. This occurs not because the machine is somehow unable to achieve what is (...)
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  7.  95
    Moral Status and Intelligent Robots.John-Stewart Gordon & David J. Gunkel - 2021 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 60 (1):88-117.
    The Southern Journal of Philosophy, Volume 60, Issue 1, Page 88-117, March 2022.
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  8. Facing Animals: A Relational, Other-Oriented Approach to Moral Standing.Mark Coeckelbergh & David J. Gunkel - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (5):715-733.
    In this essay we reflect critically on how animal ethics, and in particular thinking about moral standing, is currently configured. Starting from the work of two influential “analytic” thinkers in this field, Peter Singer and Tom Regan, we examine some basic assumptions shared by these positions and demonstrate their conceptual failings—ones that have, despite efforts to the contrary, the general effect of marginalizing and excluding others. Inspired by the so-called “continental” philosophical tradition , we then argue that what is needed (...)
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  9. Introduction to the Special Issue on Machine Morality: The Machine as Moral Agent and Patient.David J. Gunkel & Joanna Bryson - 2014 - Philosophy and Technology 27 (1):5-8.
    One of the enduring concerns of moral philosophy is deciding who or what is deserving of ethical consideration. This special issue of Philosophy and Technology investigates whether and to what extent machines, of various designs and configurations, can or should be considered moral subjects, defined here as either a moral agent, a moral patient, or both. The articles that comprise the issue were competitively selected from papers initially prepared for and presented at a symposium on this subject matter convened during (...)
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  10.  12
    The Relational Turn.David J. Gunkel - 2022 - In Janina Loh & Wulf Loh (eds.), Social Robotics and the Good Life: The Normative Side of Forming Emotional Bonds with Robots. Transcript Verlag. pp. 55-76.
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  11.  38
    Response to “The Problem of the Question About Animal Ethics” by Michal Piekarski.Mark Coeckelbergh & David J. Gunkel - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (4):717-721.
    In this brief article we reply to Michal Piekarski’s response to our article ‘Facing Animals’ published previously in this journal. In our article we criticized the properties approach to defining the moral standing of animals, and in its place proposed a relational and other-oriented concept that is based on a transcendental and phenomenological perspective, mainly inspired by Heidegger, Levinas, and Derrida. In this reply we question and problematize Piekarski’s interpretation of our essay and critically evaluate “the ethics of commitment” that (...)
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  12.  14
    Shifting Perspectives.David J. Gunkel - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (5):2527-2532.
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  13.  75
    Thinking otherwise: Ethics, technology and other subjects.David J. Gunkel - 2007 - Ethics and Information Technology 9 (3):165-177.
    Ethics is ordinarily understood as being concerned with questions of responsibility for and in the face of an other. This other is more often than not conceived of as another human being and, as such, necessarily excludes others – most notably animals and machines. This essay examines the ethics of such exclusivity. It is divided into three parts. The first part investigates the exclusive anthropocentrism of traditional forms of moral␣thinking and, following the example of recent innovations in animal rights philosophy, (...)
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  14.  8
    How to Survive a Robot Invasion: Rights, Responsibility, and Ai.David J. Gunkel - 2019 - Routledge.
    In this short introduction, David J. Gunkel examines the shifting world of artificial intelligence, mapping it onto everyday twenty-first century life and probing the consequences of this ever-growing industry and movement. The book investigates the significance and consequences of the robot invasion in an effort to map the increasingly complicated social terrain of the twenty-first century. Whether we recognize it as such or not, we are in the midst of a robot invasion. What matters most in the face of this (...)
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  15.  18
    Duty Now and for the Future: Communication, Ethics and Artificial Intelligence.David J. Gunkel - 2023 - Journal of Media Ethics 38 (4):198-210.
    This essay examines whether and to what extent the “other” in communicative interactions may be otherwise than another human subject and the moral opportunities and challenges this alteration would make available to us. Toward this end, the analysis proceeds in five steps or movements. The first reviews the way the discipline of communication has typically perceived and theorized the role and function of technology. The second and third parts investigate the critical challenges that emerging technology, such as artificial intelligence applications (...)
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  16.  11
    Special Section: Rethinking Art and Aesthetics in the Age of Creative Machines: Editor’s Introduction.David J. Gunkel - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (3):263-265.
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  17.  3
    Of remixology: ethics and aesthetics after remix.David J. Gunkel - 2016 - Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press.
    A new theory of moral and aesthetic value for the age of remix, going beyond the usual debates over originality and appropriation. Remix—or the practice of recombining preexisting content—has proliferated across media both digital and analog. Fans celebrate it as a revolutionary new creative practice; critics characterize it as a lazy and cheap (and often illegal) recycling of other people's work. In Of Remixology, David Gunkel argues that to understand remix, we need to change the terms of the debate. The (...)
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  18.  76
    Principi di Remixologia. Una assiologia per il XXI Secolo e oltre (traduzione di F. Fossa).Fabio Fossa & David J. Gunkel - 2019 - Odradek (1):411-434.
    Among the many forms of artistic expression that characterize the digital era, remix occupies a rather central position. At the same time, however, the success of remix as an artistic practice raises several hard questions. What is original and what is derived? How can we sort out and make sense of questions concerning origination and derivation in situations where one thing is appropriated, reused, and repurposed for something else? What theory of moral and aesthetic value can accommodate and explain these (...)
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  19.  5
    The Changing Face of Alterity: Communication, Technology and Other Subjects.David J. Gunkel, Ciro Marcondes Filho & Dieter Mersch (eds.) - 2016 - New York: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Addressing a challenge and opportunity that is definitive of life in the 21st century, this book provides a range of possible solutions that serve to motivate and structure future research and debate around the concept of 'the other' in communication.
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  20. Around "Deconstruction." Author’s Response.David J. Gunkel - 2023 - Studia Philosophiae Christianae 59 (2):7-20.
    In this paper I reply to the four critical articles that were provided in response to my book Deconstruction (MIT Press 2021). It proceeds in four steps: (1) I begin with a reply to Stanisław Chankowski’s use of the psychoanalytic term “fetishistic denial” to describe the formal character of the text. (2) I then engage with the criticism supplied by Piotr Kozak, who questions deconstruction’s theory of truth (or its lack thereof). (3) From this, I take-up and respond to Przemysław (...)
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  21.  20
    Better Living Through Technology.David J. Gunkel - 2017 - Foundations of Science 22 (2):349-352.
    In this brief response to Mark Coeckelbergh’s contribution, I demonstrate how the author introduces an important shift in the way we approach technology. Instead of focusing on the new and often-times dramatic existential vulnerabilities supposedly introduced by technological innovation, Coeckelbergh targets the way technology already transforms our existential vulnerabilities. And I show how this shift in focus has three very important consequences: a different way to ask about and investigate the question concerning technology, the importance of hacking as a mode (...)
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  22.  2
    Deconstruction.David J. Gunkel - 2021 - London, England: The MIT Press.
    A short, reader-friendly introduction to a complex philosophical topic. One that encompasses not just philosophical and literary topics but technological ones as well.
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  23.  6
    Deconstruction. Critical Interventions for the 21st Century and Beyond.David J. Gunkel - 2022 - Studia Philosophiae Christianae 58 (2):89-108.
    This essay seeks to make a case for deconstruction as a kind of critical intervention for responding to and dealing with the opportunities and challenges of the 21st century and beyond. Toward this end, it proceeds in three steps or movements. (1) The first part will deconstruct deconstruction, deliberately employing what will be revealed as an inaccurate vernacular understanding of the term in order to extract a more precise and technical characterization of the concept. (2) The second part will investigate (...)
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  24.  8
    Gaming the system: deconstructing video games, games studies, and virtual worlds.David J. Gunkel - 2018 - Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press.
    Terra nova 2.0 -- The real problem -- Social contract 2.0 -- In the face of others -- Open-ended conclusions.
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  25.  5
    Heidegger and the media.David J. Gunkel - 2014 - Malden, Massachusetts: Polity Press. Edited by Paul A. Taylor.
    The most significant philosopher of Being, Martin Heidegger has nevertheless largely been ignored within communications studies. This book sets the record straight by demonstrating the profound implications of his unique philosophical project for our understanding of today's mediascape. The full range of Heidegger's writing from Being and Time to his later essays is drawn upon.
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  26. Handbook of the Ethics of AI.David J. Gunkel (ed.) - forthcoming - Edward Elgar Publishing.
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  27.  5
    The changing face of alterity: communication, technology, and other subjects.David J. Gunkel, Ciro Marcondes & Dieter Mersch (eds.) - 2016 - New York: Rowman & Littlefield International.
    Addressing a challenge and opportunity that is definitive of life in the 21st century, this book provides a range of possible solutions that serve to motivate and structure future research and debate around the concept of 'the other' in communication.
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  28.  26
    Virtually transcendent: Cyberculture and the body.David J. Gunkel - 1998 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 13 (2):111 – 123.
    T h i s article examines the ethical implications of the desirefor disembodiment situated in the texts and technologies of cyberspace. The article is divided into 2 parts. The first traces the conceptual history of dualism, demonstrating its exclusive cultural politics and investigating the socio-political consequences of encoding this metaphysical information in contemporary media technology. The second part examines the material conditions of new communication technology, arguing that the issue of access reduplicates in practice the exclusivity of dualism. The article (...)
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  29.  5
    Žižek studies: the greatest hits (so far).David J. Gunkel & Paul A. Taylor (eds.) - 2020 - New York, NY: Peter Lang.
    Zizek Studies: The Greatest Hits (So Far) assembles and presents the best work published in the field of Zizek Studies over the last ten years, providing teachers, students, and researchers with a carefully curated volume of leading-edge scholarship addressing the unique and sometimes eclectic work of Slovenian philosopher and cultural critic Slavoj Zizek. The chapters included in this collection have been rigorously tested in and culled from the (virtual) pages of the International Journal of Zizek Studies, a leading open access (...)
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  30.  29
    Mark Coeckelbergh: Growing moral relations: critique of moral status ascription: Palgrave Macmillan, New York, 2012, 239 pp, ISBN: 978-1-137-02595-1. [REVIEW]David J. Gunkel - 2013 - Ethics and Information Technology 15 (3):239-241.
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  31.  7
    Book Review: How We Became Our Data: A Genealogy of the Informational Person, by Colin Koopman. [REVIEW]David J. Gunkel - 2021 - Political Theory 49 (5):873-877.
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