Results for 'David H. Filkenstein'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Replies to My Commentators.David H. Filkenstein - 2011 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):79-96.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  10
    "Précis of" Expression and the Inner".David H. Filkenstein - 2011 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):5-14.
  3.  18
    Causation and Intelligibility: David H. Sanford.David H. Sanford - 1994 - Philosophy 69 (267):55-67.
    I shall venture to affirm, as a general proposition which admits of no exception, that the knowledge of this relation is not, in any instance, attained by reasonings a priori, but arises entirely from experience, when we find that any particular objects are constantly conjoined with each other.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  50
    A Learning Algorithm for Boltzmann Machines.David H. Ackley, Geoffrey E. Hinton & Terrence J. Sejnowski - 1985 - Cognitive Science 9 (1):147-169.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   210 citations  
  5.  8
    Expression and the Inner.David H. Finkelstein - 2003 - Harvard University Press.
    At least since Descartes, philosophers have been interested in the special knowledge or authority that we exhibit when we speak about our own thoughts, attitudes, and feelings. This book contends that even the best work in contemporary philosophy of mind fails to account for this sort of knowledge or authority because it does not pay the right sort of attention to the notion of expression. What's at stake is not only how to understand self-knowledge and first-person authority, but also what (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   75 citations  
  6.  11
    Reaction Item to Changes in the Intensity of White Noise.David H. Raab & Mitchell Grossberg - 1965 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (6):609.
  7. Expression and the Inner.David H. Finkelstein - 2006 - Philosophical Quarterly 56 (224):466-468.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   79 citations  
  8.  63
    Philanthropy as Strategy When Corporate Charity “Begins at Home”.David H. Saiia, Archie B. Carroll & Ann K. Buchholtz - 2003 - Business and Society 42 (2):169-201.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   85 citations  
  9.  17
    Flow and Structure of Time Experience – Concept, Empirical Validation and Implications for Psychopathology.David H. V. Vogel, Christine M. Falter-Wagner, Theresa Schoofs, Katharina Krämer, Christian Kupke & Kai Vogeley - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (2):235-258.
    We present a conceptual framework on the experience of time and provide a coherent basis on which to base further inquiries into qualitative approaches concerning time experience. We propose two Time-Layers and two Time-Formats forming four Time-Domains. Micro-Flow and Micro-Structure represent the implicit phenomenal basis, from which the explicit experiences of Macro-Flow and Macro-Structure emerge. Complementary to this theoretical proposal, we present empirical results from qualitative content analysis obtained from 25 healthy participants. The data essentially corroborate the theoretical proposal. With (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  10.  11
    David Rex et Propheta. Hugo Steger.David H. Wright - 1964 - Speculum 39 (4):751-753.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  31
    Review of R Eal Time.David H. Sanford - 1984 - Philosophical Review 93 (2):289.
  12. The Problem of the Many, Many Composition Questions, and Naive Mereology.David H. Sanford - 1993 - Noûs 27 (2):219-228.
    Naive mereology studies ordinary, common-sense beliefs about part and whole. Some of the speculations in this article on naive mereology do not bear directly on Peter van Inwagen's "Material Beings". The other topics, (1) and (2), both do. (1) Here is an example of Peter Unger's "Problem of the Many". How can a table be a collection of atoms when many collections of atoms have equally strong claims to be that table? Van Inwagen invokes fuzzy sets to solve this problem. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  13.  39
    If P, Then Q: Conditionals and the Foundations of Reasoning.David H. Sanford - 1989 - New York, NY, USA: Routledge.
    This new edition includes three new chapters, updating the book to take into account developments in the field over the past fifteen years.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  14. Inference to the Best Explanation: Does It Track Truth?David H. Glass - 2012 - Synthese 185 (3):411-427.
    In the form of inference known as inference to the best explanation there are various ways to characterise what is meant by the best explanation. This paper considers a number of such characterisations including several based on confirmation measures and several based on coherence measures. The goal is to find a measure which adequately captures what is meant by 'best' and which also yields the truth with a high degree of probability. Computer simulations are used to show that the overlap (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  15. Begging the Question.David H. Sanford - 1972 - Analysis 32 (6):197-199.
    A primary purpose of argument is to increase the degree of reasonable confidence that one has in the truth of the conclusion. A question begging argument fails this purpose because it violates what W. E. Johnson called an epistemic condition of inference. Although an argument of the sort characterized by Robert Hoffman in his response (Analysis 32.2, Dec 71) to Richard Robinson (Analysis 31.4, March 71) begs the question in all circumstances, we usually understand the charge that an argument is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  16.  15
    Disturbed Experience of Time in Depression—Evidence From Content Analysis.David H. V. Vogel, Katharina Krämer, Theresa Schoofs, Christian Kupke & Kai Vogeley - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  17.  20
    Threshold Theories of Signal Detection.David H. Krantz - 1969 - Psychological Review 76 (3):308-324.
  18.  15
    Flow and structure of time experience – concept, empirical validation and implications for psychopathology.David H. V. Vogel, Christine M. Falter-Wagner, Theresa Schoofs, Katharina Krämer, Christian Kupke & Kai Vogeley - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-24.
    We present a conceptual framework on the experience of time and provide a coherent basis on which to base further inquiries into qualitative approaches concerning time experience. We propose two Time-Layers and two Time-Formats forming four Time-Domains. Micro-Flow and Micro-Structure represent the implicit phenomenal basis, from which the explicit experiences of Macro-Flow and Macro-Structure emerge. Complementary to this theoretical proposal, we present empirical results from qualitative content analysis obtained from 25 healthy participants. The data essentially corroborate the theoretical proposal. With (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  19. Does Colour Constancy Exist?David H. Foster - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (10):439-443.
    For a stable visual world, the colours of objects should appear the same under different lights. This property of colour constancy has been assumed to be fundamental to vision, and many experimental attempts have been made to quantify it. I contend here, however, that the usual methods of measurement are either too coarse or concentrate not on colour constancy itself, but on other, complementary aspects of scene perception. Whether colour constancy exists other than in nominal terms remains unclear.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  20.  90
    Determinates Vs. Determinables.David H. Sanford - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Everything red is colored, and all squares are polygons. A square is distinguished from other polygons by being four-sided, equilateral, and equiangular. What distinguishes red things from other colored things? This has been understood as a conceptual rather than scientific question. Theories of wavelengths and reflectance and sensory processing are not considered. Given just our ordinary understanding of color, it seems that what differentiates red from other colors is only redness itself. The Cambridge logician W. E. Johnson introduced the terms (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  21.  36
    R. H. Nash, "Dooyeweerd and the Amsterdam Philosophy". [REVIEW]David H. Freeman - 1964 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 2 (1):122.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Deterritorialisation and Schizoanalysis in David Fincher's Fight Club.David H. Fleming & William Brown - 2011 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 5 (2):275-299.
    Taking a schizoanalytic approach to audio-visual images, this article explores some of the radical potentia for deterritorialisation found within David Fincher's Fight Club (1999). The film's potential for deterritorialisation is initially located in an exploration of the film's form and content, which appear designed to interrogate and transcend a series of false binaries between mind and body, inside and outside, male and female. Paying attention to the construction of photorealistic digital spaces and composited images, we examine the actual (and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Eccentric Existence: A Theological Anthropology.David H. Kelsey - 2009
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  24.  14
    Conjoint-Measurement Analysis of Composition Rules in Psychology.David H. Krantz & Amos Tversky - 1971 - Psychological Review 78 (2):151-169.
  25.  21
    Improvements in Human Reasoning and an Error in L. J. Cohen's.David H. Krantz - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):340-340.
  26.  8
    The Conscious Self: The Immaterial Center of Subjective States.David H. Lund - 2005 - Humanity Books.
    Self-consciousness and the self -- Diachronic unity, diachronic singularity, and the subject of consciousness -- A modal argument for immateriality -- Intelligibility concerns and causal objections -- Concluding remarks.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  27.  61
    Problems with Priors in Probabilistic Measures of Coherence.David H. Glass - 2005 - Erkenntnis 63 (3):375-385.
    Two of the probabilistic measures of coherence discussed in this paper take probabilistic dependence into account and so depend on prior probabilities in a fundamental way. An example is given which suggests that this prior-dependence can lead to potential problems. Another coherence measure is shown to be independent of prior probabilities in a clearly defined sense and consequently is able to avoid such problems. The issue of prior-dependence is linked to the fact that the first two measures can be understood (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  28.  9
    Causal Asymmetries.David H. Sanford - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):243-246.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  29.  17
    Taboo or Not Taboo: Is That the Question?David H. Spain - 1988 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 16 (3):285-301.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  30.  38
    A New Argument for the Likelihood Ratio Measure of Confirmation.David H. Glass & Mark McCartney - 2015 - Acta Analytica 30 (1):59-65.
    This paper presents a new argument for the likelihood ratio measure of confirmation by showing that one of the adequacy criteria used in another argument can be replaced by a more plausible and better supported criterion which is a special case of the weak likelihood principle. This new argument is also used to show that the likelihood ratio measure is to be preferred to a measure that has recently received support in the literature.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  31. Begging the question.David H. Sanford - 1972 - Analysis 32 (6):197.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  32.  44
    The Deme Atene - H. Lohmann: Atene-'Ατήνη: Forschungen zu Siedlungs– und Wirtschaftsstruktur des klassischen Attika. 2 vols, numbered consecutively. Pp. xxii+530 , 140 plates, 76 figs., 4 maps. Cologne: Böhlau, 1993. Cased, DM 298. [REVIEW]David H. Conwell - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (2):319-320.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  85
    A Plea for Pragmatism in Clinical Research Ethics.David H. Brendel & Franklin G. Miller - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):24 – 31.
    Pragmatism is a distinctive approach to clinical research ethics that can guide bioethicists and members of institutional review boards (IRBs) as they struggle to balance the competing values of promoting medical research and protecting human subjects participating in it. After defining our understanding of pragmatism in the setting of clinical research ethics, we show how a pragmatic approach can provide guidance not only for the day-to-day functioning of the IRB, but also for evaluation of policy standards, such as the one (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  34. For Facts as Causes and Effects.David H. Mellor - 2004 - In Ned Hall, L. A. Paul & John Collins (eds.), Causation and Counterfactuals. Cambridge: Mass.: Mit Press. pp. 309--23.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  35. The Direction of Causation and the Direction of Conditionship.David H. Sanford - 1976 - Journal of Philosophy 73 (8):193-207.
    I criticize and emend J L Mackie's account of causal priority by replacing ‘fixity’ in its central clause by 'x is a causal condition of y, but y is not a causal condition of x'. This replacement works only if 'is a causal condition of' is not a symmetric relation. Even apart from our desire to account for causal priority, it is desirable to have an account of nonsymmetric conditionship. Truth, for example, is a condition of knowledge, but knowledge is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  36. Topological Trees: G H von Wright's Theory of Possible Worlds.David H. Sanford - 1998 - In TImothy Childers (ed.), The Logica Yearbook. Acadamy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.
    In several works on modality, G. H. von Wright presents tree structures to explain possible worlds. Worlds that might have developed from an earlier world are possible relative to it. Actually possible worlds are possible relative to the world as it actually was at some point. Many logically consistent worlds are not actually possible. Transitions from node to node in a tree structure are probabilistic. Probabilities are often more useful than similarities between worlds in treating counterfactual conditionals.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  3
    Boundary Organizations in Environmental Policy and Science: An Introduction.David H. Guston - 2001 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 26 (4):399-408.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  38.  56
    The Daulistic, Discarnate Picture That Haunts the Cognitive Science of Reli- Gion.David H. Nikkel - 2015 - Zygon 50 (3):621-646.
    A dualistic, discarnate picture haunts contemporary cognitive science of religion. Cognitive scientists of religion generally assert or assume a reductive physicalism, primarily through unconscious mental mechanisms that detect supernatural agency where none exists and a larger purpose to life when none exists. Accompanying this focus is a downplaying of conscious reflection in religious belief and practice. Yet the mind side of dualism enters into CSR in interesting ways. Some cognitive scientists turn practitioners of religion into dualists who allegedly believe in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  39. On the Distinction Between Conscious and Unconscious States of Mind.David H. Finkelstein - 1999 - American Philosophical Quarterly 36 (2):79-100.
  40.  18
    From Folk Psychology to Cognitive Science: The Case Against Belief.David H. Sanford - 1986 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 47 (1):149-154.
  41. Wittgenstein on Rules and Platonism.David H. Finkelstein - 2000 - In Alice Crary & Rupert Read (eds.), The New Wittgenstein. Routledge. pp. 83-100.
  42.  73
    Competing Semantics of Vagueness: Many Values Versus Super-Truth.David H. Saford - 1976 - Synthese 33 (2-4):195--210.
    A semantics of vagueness should reject the principle that every statement has a truth-value yet retain the classical tautologies. A many-value, non-truth-functional semantics and a semantics of super-valuations each have this result. According to the super-valuation approach, 'if a man with n hairs on his head is bald, then a man with n plus one hairs on his head is also bald' is false because it comes out false no matter how the vague predicate 'is bald' is appropriately made precise. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  43.  61
    Coherence, Explanation, and Hypothesis Selection.David H. Glass - 2021 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 72 (1):1-26.
    This paper provides a new approach to inference to the best explanation based on a new coherence measure for comparing how well hypotheses explain the evidence. It addresses a number of criticisms of the use of probabilistic measures in this context by Clark Glymour, including limitations of earlier work on IBE. Computer experiments are used to show that the new approach finds the truth with a high degree of accuracy in hypothesis selection tasks and that in some cases its accuracy (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  78
    Locke, Leibniz, and Wiggins on Being in the Same Place at the Same Time.David H. Sanford - 1970 - Philosophical Review 79 (1):75-82.
    Locke thought it was a necessary truth that no two material bodies could be in the same place at the same time. Leibniz wasn't so sure. This paper sides with Leibniz. I examine the arguments of David Wiggins in defense of Locke on this point (Philosophical Review, January 1968). Wiggins’ arguments are ineffective.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  45. Fusion Confusion.David H. Sanford - 2003 - Analysis 63 (1):1–4.
    Two fusions can be in the same place at the same time. So long as a house made of Tinkertoys is intact, the fusion of all its Tinkertoys parts coincides with the fusion of it walls and its roof. If none of the Tinkertoys is destroyed, their fusion persists through the complete disassembly of the house. (So the house is not a fusion of its Tinkertoy parts.) The fusion of the walls and roof does not persist through the complete disassembly (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  46.  74
    Infinity and Vagueness.David H. Sanford - 1975 - Philosophical Review 84 (4):520-535.
    Many philosophic arguments concerned with infinite series depend on the mutual inconsistency of statements of the following five forms: (1) something exists which has R to something; (2) R is asymmetric; (3) R is transitive; (4) for any x which has R to something, there is something which has R to x; (5) only finitely many things are related by R. Such arguments are suspect if the two-place relation R in question involves any conceptual vagueness or inexactness. Traditional sorites arguments (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  47.  20
    Do Infants Possess an Evolved Spider-Detection Mechanism?David H. Rakison & Jaime Derringer - 2008 - Cognition 107 (1):381-393.
  48.  17
    Begging the Question as Involving Actual Belief and Inconceivable Without It.David H. Sanford - 1988 - Metaphilosophy 19 (1):32–37.
    This article answers John Biro's "Knowability, Believability, and Begging the Question: a Reply to Sanford" in "Metaphilosophy" 15 (1984). Biro and I agree that of two argument instances with the same form and content, one but not the other can beg the question, depending on other factors. These factors include actual beliefs, or so I maintain (against Biro) with the help of some analysed examples. Brief selections from Archbishop Whatley and J S Mill suggest that they also regard reference to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  49.  39
    Borderline Logic.David H. Sanford - 1975 - American Philosophical Quarterly 12 (1):29-39.
    To accommodate vague statements and predicates, I propose an infinite-valued, non-truth-functional interpretation of logic on which the tautologies are exactly the tautologies of classical two-valued logic. iI introduce a determinacy operator, analogous to the necessity operator in alethic modal logic, to allow the definition of first-order and higher-order borderline cases. On the interpretation proposed for determinacy, every statement corresponding to a theorem of modal system T is a logical truth, and I conjecture that every logical truth on the interpretation corresponds (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  50.  37
    Dopaminergic-Neuropeptide Interactions in the Social Brain.David H. Skuse & Louise Gallagher - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (1):27-35.
1 — 50 / 1000